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  2. TomBAvoider

    Brian May - "Very healthy" but "near death"

    While this may give us more data, the problem is we often don't know how to evaluate such data. Say you find a small growth - there is no way of knowing whether that's something that needs to be treated or whether it will regress on its own. Cancer cells are formed all the time, and with frequency result in small growths - but a tremendous number of such are handled by our immune system, the same way invasive bacteria are handled on a daily basis. So now you see that small growth and what do you do with it? That's the whole idea behind "watchful waiting" in prostate cancer. And to top it off, there is very little evidence that early interventions do anything in any case, even when the cancer is malignant. Now, I'm not saying some things might not be useful - seeing that your arteries are blocked is definitely helpful. But one has to be super careful about knowing when it's useful and when it's just an expensive fishing expedition that may seriously lower your QOL and even health outcomes. It's tricky. We have powerful tools. The problem is we don't have enough knowledge to always know how to best use such tools.
  3. Homozygous carriers of the Apo E4 ("Alzheimer's gene") variant have double the risk of severe Covid-19 Dementia gene raises risk of severe COVID-19 https://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/research/title_797679_en.html
  4. BrianA

    Brian May - "Very healthy" but "near death"

    Well it's definitely debatable in some respects, particularly in regards to cost, but I was reminded of it due to Brian May being so surprised at his poor arterial health. In this study that Human Longevity Inc did on over 1000 Health Nucleus patients, they were able to discover calcified artery plaque, valve flow problems, and other cardiac issues. Some of this is done with a cardiac CT calcium scan, not MRI. Also extensive blood tests and full genome scan are done. If you're a well off musician and can afford it, why wait until you have a heart attack to find out that your arteries are clogging up? Precision medicine integrating whole-genome sequencing, comprehensive metabolomics, and advanced imaging https://www.pnas.org/content/117/6/3053 https://www.humanlongevity.com/human-longevitys-largest-study-of-its-kind-shows-early-detection-of-disease-and-disease-risks-in-adults/ “This study shows that the definition of ‘healthy’ may not be what we think it is and depends upon a comprehensive health evaluation,” said J. Craig Venter, PhD “Our traditional approach to the annual health assessment has been very superficial and will need to be replaced by data-driven measures that will be made possible as costs continue to decline for whole- genome sequencing, advanced imaging, especially MRI, and specialized blood analytics,” said David Karow, MD, PhD
  5. Ron Put

    Post a picture of what you just ate

    OK, here is my Cronometer day. No veggies to speak of, but just didn't feel like it today. Tomorrow is another day.
  6. LOL, always back to "god is in the gaps...". :) No, we don't know if the Big Bang was a singularity which somehow transferred to an inflationary state. But give us a break, it's been barely three centuries during which scientific knowledge was allowed to flourish, and look where we are! We can see worlds on paper-thin screens, have video calls with people across the world and tinker with our DNA! A good argument can be made that if it wasn't for Christian dogma taking over Europe and effectively destroying and suppressing knowledge, the world of science would be far, far ahead. But things seem cyclical and significant geopolitical disruptions often lead to periods of intellectual dark ages. It's almost a given that humanity will enter another one at some point. And, Mike41, yes, that's how them science things work. And yes, your brain creates the world you perceive, and it paints a picture of the "world" based on a very small part of our surroundings, which our senses perceive. And that's OK. I am grateful for it. So is my dog. Cheers.
  7. And for good measure: How Fear, Groupthink Drove Unnecessary Global Lockdowns Reliance on Faulty Models In the face of a novel virus threat, China clamped down on its citizens. Academics used faulty information to build faulty models. Leaders relied on these faulty models. Dissenting views were suppressed. The media flamed fears and the world panicked. That is the story of what may eventually be known as one of the biggest medical and economic blunders of all time. The collective failure of every Western nation, except one, to question groupthink will surely be studied by economists, doctors, and psychologists for decades to come. ... Yet we put billions of young healthy people under house arrest, stopped cancer screenings, and sunk ourselves into the worst level of unemployment since the Great Depression. This from a virus that bears a survival rate of 99.99% if you are a healthy individual under 50 years old (1, 2). New York City reached over a 25% infection rate and yet 99.98% of all people in the city under 45 survived, making it comparable to death rates by normal accidents. But of course the whole linchpin of the lockdown argument is that it would have been even worse without such a step. Sweden never closed down borders, primary schools, restaurants, or businesses, and never mandated masks, yet 99.998% of all their people under 60 have survived and their hospitals were never overburdened. Why did we lock down the majority of the population who were never at significant risk? ... China concealed the extent of the viral outbreak, which, if you believed its data, led many scientists to believe that 2% to 5% of all infected patients would die. This turned out to be off by a factor of 10, but academic epidemiologists have a history of wildly-off-the-mark doomsday predictions.... The March 16 report by Imperial College epidemiologist Neil Ferguson is credited (or blamed) with causing the U.K. to lock down and contributing to the domino effect of global lockdowns. The model has since come under intense criticism for being “totally unreliable and a buggy mess.” This is the same Neil Ferguson who in 2005 predicted 200 million could die from the bird flu. Total deaths over the last 15 years turned out to be 455. This is the same Neil Ferguson who in 2009 predicted that 65,000 people could die in the U.K. from the swine flu. The final number ended up around 392. Now, in 2020, he predicted that 500,000 British would die from coronavirus. His deeply flawed model led the United States to fear over 2 million deaths and was used to justify locking down nearly the entire nation. Dr. Ferguson is a character of Shakespearean drama and tragedy. His March 17 presentation to British elites on the dire need to take action ironically may have infected Boris Johnson and other top British officials, as Mr. Ferguson himself tested positive for COVID-19 two days later. Then in May he resigned in disgrace after he broke his own quarantine rules to meet clandestinely with a married woman. But I don’t place most of the blame on people like Ferguson. If you are a hammer everything looks like a nail. I blame government leaders for failing to surround themselves with diverse viewpoints and to think critically for themselves.... Politicians claim lockdowns were the cause of fewer deaths It would be highly embarrassing to force citizens to quarantine themselves only to later admit it was all a colossal blunder, so it is easier for politicians and modelers to claim the lower death rates were based on the lockdowns themselves. It was a success! ... Political leaders ignored early evidence when it conflicted with their models There are those who say that we couldn’t have known these outcomes early on, so even if lockdowns were unjustified later they were still necessary early due to lack of information. That is plainly false. Italy’s alarming number of deaths fanned many of the early fears across the world, but by March 17 it was clear that the median age of Italian deaths was over 80 and that not a single person under 30 had died in that country. Furthermore, it was known that 99% of those who died had other existing illnesses. A much more rational strategy would have been to lock down nursing homes and let young healthy people out to build immunity. Instead we did the opposite, we forced nursing homes to take COVID-19 patients and locked down young people. ...
  8. Ron Put

    Olive oil? Healthy or not?!

    mccoy, I like good olive oil, but then I also like the signature Lady M cake :) Occasionally, either is fine, but as a staple, probably not. As to secoiridoids, I believe that there is more in olive leaf powder generally than in olive oil. Also, take a look at this: Secoiridoids delivered as olive leaf extract induce acute improvements in human vascular function and reduction of an inflammatory cytokine: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial The leaves of the olive plant (Olea europaea) are rich in polyphenols, of which oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol (HT) are most characteristic. Such polyphenols have been demonstrated to favourably modify a variety of cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of the present intervention was to investigate the influence of olive leaf extract (OLE) on vascular function and inflammation in a postprandial setting and to link physiological outcomes with absorbed phenolics. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over, acute intervention trial was conducted with eighteen healthy volunteers (nine male, nine female), who consumed either OLE (51 mg oleuropein; 10 mg HT), or a matched control (separated by a 4-week wash out) on a single occasion. Vascular function was measured by digital volume pulse (DVP), while blood collected at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 h was cultured for 24 h in the presence of lipopolysaccharide in order to investigate effects on cytokine production. Urine was analysed for phenolic metabolites by HPLC. DVP-stiffness index and ex vivo IL-8 production were significantly reduced (P< 0·05) after consumption of OLE compared to the control. These effects were accompanied by the excretion of several phenolic metabolites, namely HT and oleuropein derivatives, which peaked in urine after 8–24 h. The present study provides the first evidence that OLE positively modulates vascular function and IL-8 production in vivo, adding to growing evidence that olive phenolics could be beneficial for health.
  9. LOL on Lukashenko, but I think you might have missed the jest.... As to who has claimed otherwise, you seem to want to have your cake and eat it, too. In other words, you cheer the nonsense used to justify the lock-downs, while opining strategically that you are not for the lock-downs. And peppered in between are references to the more grotesque American or Western European reactions, or mocking poor Lukashenko, who is now right up with Soros on Putin's hate list. But yeah, a few people certainly seem grateful for the lockdowns, some even on this page. They have forgotten that the main justification for following China's model was that "Covid-19 is NOT as contagious as the flu" and can thus be contained. Of course, if WHO's Tedros and the lockdown brigade were correct, Italy and NY would be Covid-19 free....
  10. Ron Put

    Blood Pressure

    drewab, these values are excellent, especially if without medication. Mine seem to average 112/71 according to Qardio, since I started taking measurement about two weeks ago,. As I average close to 2000 kcal per day, I don't know if I would place myself in the CR group, although my BMI is 18.5 today.
  11. drewab

    Blood Pressure

    This thread led me to actually quantify my last 18 blood pressure readings in memory on my at-home cuff, at OMRON HEM-741. It cost about $130 when I purchased it about a decade ago. It's been a reliable machine ever since. My systolic value isn't quite as low as some, but then again my level of CR isn't quite as low as others here (BMI = 21) and having had OHS 2x, I am happy with the value. When I don't consume caffeine (coffee more so than green tea) my systolic value is reliably lower by about 5-7 mmHg - the reading below are all caffeinated measures. At times my RHR has been lower too, but I'm not exercising as much at the moment, which still means more than most people and I doubt there is much of a benefit from a reduction below 59. Considering there was a time well over a decade ago when I was on blood pressure medication in my 20's and had systolic readings in the 140-150's, I'll take my results!
  12. Who in this forum has claimed otherwise? Not me, certainly. I'm just curious who you think you are arguing with here on that point.
  13. Ron Put

    Brian May - "Very healthy" but "near death"

    Yep, my take too. My doctor dislikes these too, since you see a lot of "maybes" which must then be followed up (sometimes with invasive procedures), most often to nothing.
  14. Sure Ron. And yet YOU are the one making direct comparisons like this: It's great you are so trusting of the statistics coming out of the Lukashenko regime in Belarus. Confirmation bias? Of course, if the state-provided Covid-19 statistics are actually all "garbage in, garbage out", then what's the point of your making such comparisons and all the similar ones you keep making using those kind of statistics? Apparently, it's "garbage in, garbage out" only when it suits your ideology-driven argument. Again, not very scientific.
  15. Hahha, Al, "deaths from stress at work?!!" Do you really suppose those are less than the deaths from the lock-down and all the fear and economic stress it has caused,? Or, the stress to come from the economic meltdown and the potential for geopolitical upheaval, which may bring wars to places we think safe? Yes, I looked at the data. But did you guys actually look at the data and actually think about what it is and what it may mean? Plus, none of this (including the Michael Moore non-sequitur) address the main point of the argument. But let's look at the data. First, despite what that shill paper Sibiriak posted, most US states do not report flu deaths, period. NY doesn't, other than for confirmed infant cases, and CA doesn't except for confirmed and similarly selective cases. Which is why the CDC takes a while before they have an official number. But now everyone is counting Covid-19 with bated breath, lumping in "probables" in a race to justify the lock-downs. Thus, in fact it is comparing the very small numbers of flu cases reported by states like NY and CA, to the almost certainly inflated Covid-19 death numbers, at least in NY, is grossly misleading. And even so, the CDC P&I number for 2017-2018 is 10.9, while the states provided P&I for Covid-19 is 15.8, including all all the "probables" and whatever else is in there. This is significant, but by no means the plague. And far, far lower than the estimates for 1969 and 1957. But where did all the heart attacks go? Or the strokes? I posted earlier that those are at levels close to 50% of normal for this time of year, in many places. What about deaths due to deferred healthcare maintenance, including stuff like cancer biopsies and treatments, which were considered elective? Where did all the normal flu deaths go? And what about the fact that NY and CA both required that nursing homes accept Covid-19 cases, which most likely contributed to the very high death toll in NY's nursing homes. At the end, the CDC will have to sort it all out and come up with an "official" death toll, which will hopefully not be politically influenced. More on that data. Is there a particular reason to think that lock-downs did anything to reduce mortality? The Swedish Covid-19 death rate is roughly what their annual flu death rate is. Yes, it is smaller than Denmark's, but then Stockholm, where the vast majority of deaths occured, is a real city, while Copenhagen is a nice town. Sweden has large nursing facilities, while Denmark and Norway have a much more dispersed elderly population. And then there is the randomness of small samples. Or take Belarus -- I can't wait to hear how the Belorussians are much better citizens and more "civil" than the Brits, the Americans, or the French.... I am still puzzled by the refusal to admit that the CDC estimates for the flu deaths in 1969 and 1957 are bad, but somehow the state-provided Covid-19 numbers, including all the "probables," whatever that means, are to be trusted? To me, it just bias confirmation, where those who believed in the models predicting 750,000 deaths in the UK and 2 million deaths in NY, have a really hard time accepting that they were wrong. Very wrong. Which leads me to the whole point some are missing, while desperately scrambling on defending that Covid-19 "is not the flu." Was the shut down of the Western world warranted, based on the evidence? Clearly, anyone sane can see that the unprecedented crash of the economy, the likely global upheavals and the general fear instilled in society, were not justified by this coronavirus, which is at worst a bit worse than the 2018 flu death toll, and only in some locales, like NY. Chers.
  16. TomBAvoider

    Brian May - "Very healthy" but "near death"

    What an amazing new way to get unnessary treatments! Vast new numbers of stuff that left on its own would never develop into anything pathological. And even if those things do develop into f.ex. cancer, a lot of research shows the treatment does not prolong life or QOL, in fact it might diminish it compared to no treatment. And all this for a low, low yearly fee. Amazing, what the profit motive in medicine can accomplish!
  17. Yesterday
  18. @mccoy, #2 was just supposed to be an illustration of #1, nothing more. The relevance is that excess mortality cannot be ascribed to the concurrent pandemic based on the meer temporal association of the two, as you seemed to be saying.
  19. Dean Pomerleau

    How sustainable is a CRON lifestyle?

    Hi April - great to hear from you again! I used to really enjoy your CR blog and hope you start it up again. We really need a woman's perspective on CR, it is sorely missed around here. Keep us posted! --Dean
  20. April

    How sustainable is a CRON lifestyle?

    Wow, Dean and Saul, agreeing... Hey y'all, it's April, a blast from the past! I've spent the last oh say six years in Public Health specializing in harm reduction approaches to addiction, trauma informed care, and psychopharmacology. I'm thinking of kicking up a new CR blog, as it's rather topical given the increased risk of serious illness and death from COVID-19 if you're obese or have diabetes, and the crisis that's about to hit our healthcare system when all those people who have been neglecting their care for chronic illness (high blood pressure, diabetes, all the diseases of obesity) are about to have even more serious medical problems than before. I quit blogging largely because as I went into public health, I didn't want my own personal lifestyle to be construed as a recommendation for the general public - doing CR is not desirable for most "normal" people. But now I am thinking of starting it up again, or a new one. The world is changing fast and now that I have my Masters in Public Health as well as some 23 years or so of managing large health-oriented organizations, it seems like a good time to both a) be alive as long as I can b) share some news about how you do this with others who are interested. I know a lot more at 45 than I did back when I started (29!!!! I feel like I was 12!) I've been through a lot since then, including gaining weight and getting high blood pressure, losing it and getting back into shape, teaching in a public school district 99% below the poverty level, giving presentations on non-traditional perspectives on drug use at national conferences, leading an international group of people who seek to change their alcohol consumption but set their own goals (not just abstinence or "sobriety" but including moderation and safer drinking as well)... and I still make an excellent portabello mushroom pizza (you use the mushroom cap as the crust instead of a pizza crust - it's an old favorite!) I miss you all... and those I haven't met, and those who don't hang out anymore. I'll post if I start up the blog again... 2004 - 20012. Re-start in 2020?
  21. BrianA

    Brian May - "Very healthy" but "near death"

    BTW, there are some emerging health businesses to try and let people know ahead of time if they might have emerging or unknown health issues. For example there is Health Nucleus from Craig Venter, using high sensitivity MRI and other imaging, they claim to be able to sometimes find earlier signs of cancer or cardiac issues: https://www.healthnucleus.com/ Runs like $3k a year or something like that I heard, if you want to do an annual checkup.
  22. We humans are so arrogant! These smarty pants scientists thought they had it all figured out with Newtonian physics then quantum weirdness came along. We don’t even know what matter is. It ain’t what Newton thought that’s for damn sure. It could all just be a big delusion and it’s basically All consciousness whatever that would mean! I’m with Plato and his cave allegory for the most part
  23. TomBAvoider

    Brian May - "Very healthy" but "near death"

    I believe Mike Colella who posts often here, has some form of FM (if I remember correctly) - possibly a mild form. In any case, if I recall correctly, he claimed at some point that only pretty rigorous CR helped bring his lipid numbers down. But really, he should speak for himself, this is just my recollection. I'm a different example. Even during my most severe CR - less than 1200 cal/day, sustained for quite a while - my LDL never dropped below 124 or so (there was one time it got to like 118 but that was freakish), BMI of 18. Short term, actually water-only fasting for 8 days straight, still had my LDL at 138 upon testing. And trust me - or not - but I've done all I could think of diet-wise, consuming as little saturated fat as humanly possible, tons, TONS of fiber, including psyllium which is supposed to bring down LDL, all kinds of vegetables, tea and so on that's supposed to bring the lipids down. Nothing doing. Exercise quite a bit - no impact on LDL. My HDL is good though, never below 70 or so (there were years where I had it much higher, like 105), my triglycerides usually in the 50's. Only the LDL sucks, and as a result, my total cholesterol sucks - never below 200 (lowest I got it was 204, usually I hover around 210-220). And so I started taking statins - 5mg daily atorvastatin. Now my LDL is 73 and HDL at 70, TC 158 - completely impossible without statins. So, IF high cholesterol causes heart disease, then I'm pretty sure you can't fix it with only diet or exercise in all cases. Although one strange wrinkle in all of this - there are all those calculators that calculate your odds of having heart problems within the next 10 years - and none of them showed my risk high enough to justify statins - my risk showed as quite low, I guess due to other factors like my BP being good etc. But despite the guidlines saying that I don't *have* to take statins, my doctor - and I agreed - thought that my LDL is high enough that it's concerning and a lowest dose statin could be helpful. Whether the statin does me any good is of course an unknown - it gets my cholesterol numbers down, but... who knows, the statin might even be a net negative. I'm rolling the dice anyhow.
  24. Mike41

    Olive oil? Healthy or not?!

    From the article cited by Ron. Totally contradicts Sibiriaks studies. IAC the stuff has zero nutrients so what the hell why chance it. Stick with what Michael Pollan says. Whole Foods, mostly plants and not too much. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17174226/
  25. Point # 1, clear enough and I agree, although extrapolation is used at times, with all its pros and cons. Point # 2, is less clear. In the smoking example, there is an association of cigarette smoking and lung cancer. It is not correct to say that someone who smokes likely has lung cancer. What we can infer from the association is that in smokers the probability of developing lung cancer is higher than in those who are not smokers, adjusting for other factors. The association suggests a causation for various reasons: the hazard ratio is much higher in smokers, the toxicity of nicotine and other compounds of cigarette smoke has been ascertained by other studies, the biological mechanisms have been investigated by other studies. Your examples on astrological sign and blood type are maybe ill-expressed. If astrological sign has no influence on lung cancer, no correlation, as it is likely, then a subset of the population with a given astrological sign should exhibit the same hazard ratio of the whole sample. Of course, there is lesser numerosity, so the confidence interval will be wider, but the average HR will be about the same. Maybe you wanted to say something like, exposure to car exhausts. That's another variable which is correlated to lung cancer, so the effect of this variable must be excluded from the analysis. This is done by 'adjusting' for other factors which are known to increase lung cancer hazard. But at the end of it, I don't see how that correlates to the original discussion on mortality excess.
  26. gombo2

    Gombo current diet

    Yes i am him
  27. Gordo

    Brian May - "Very healthy" but "near death"

    Well anyone who's gotten lipid profile bloodwork should know if they have familial hypercholesterolemia. I'm skeptical that dietary interventions couldn't prevent heart disease even in such a person though.
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