Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Yesterday
  2. Health in old age is a lifelong affair Reduced food intake in old mice can no longer improve health https://www.mpg.de/14021239/1017-balt-110438-health-in-old-age-is-a-lifelong-affair
  3. Food deprivation during active phase induces skeletal muscle atrophy via IGF-1 reduction in mice. Abe T, Kazama R, Okauchi H, Oishi K. Arch Biochem Biophys. 2019 Oct 19:108160. doi: 10.1016/j.abb.2019.108160. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 31639326 Abstract Skeletal muscle mass is largely influenced by nutritional status and physical activity. Although feeding at specific times of the day (time-restricted feeding, TRF) modulates obesity and other metabolic functions, its effects on skeletal muscles remain unclear. We explored the effects of feeding mice only during the inactive (daytime feeding, DF) or active (nighttime feeding, NF) phases for one week. Daytime feeding did not abolish the nocturnal activity rhythm, although total daily activity was reduced in these mice. Temporal expression of the circadian clock genes, Per2 and Rev-erbα, became synchronized to the feeding cycle in the liver, but not in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle mass, grip strength, and cross-sectional area were significantly lower in DF, than in NF mice, although DF increased body weight gain and lipid accumulation. Expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases, Atrogin-1 and Murf1 and the autophagy-related genes, Lc3b and Bnip3, was induced during the active phase in the gastrocnemius muscles of DF, compared with those of NF mice. Plasma IGF-1 concentrations and Igf-1 expression in the livers and gastrocnemius muscles during the active phase were lower in DF, than in NF mice. Furthermore, exogenous IGF-1 injection significantly suppressed DF-induced reduction in gastrocnemius muscle mass, which might at least partly explain the association between decreased plasma IGF-1 concentrations and reductions in the skeletal muscle mass of DF mice. These findings suggest that feeding only during the inactive phase reduces skeletal muscle mass via a decrease in plasma IGF-1 concentrations during the active phase. KEYWORDS: Circadian clock; Insulin; Insulin-like growth factor-1; Muscle atrophy; Obesity; Time-restricted feeding Systemic GDF11 stimulates the secretion of adiponectin and induces a calorie restriction-like phenotype in aged mice. Katsimpardi L, Kuperwasser N, Camus C, Moigneu C, Chiche A, Tolle V, Li H, Kokovay E, Lledo PM. Aging Cell. 2019 Oct 22:e13038. doi: 10.1111/acel.13038. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 31637864 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/acel.13038 Abstract Aging is a negative regulator of general homeostasis, tissue function, and regeneration. Changes in organismal energy levels and physiology, through systemic manipulations such as calorie restriction and young blood infusion, can regenerate tissue activity and increase lifespan in aged mice. However, whether these two systemic manipulations could be linked has never been investigated. Here, we report that systemic GDF11 triggers a calorie restriction-like phenotype without affecting appetite or GDF15 levels in the blood, restores the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway, and stimulates adiponectin secretion from white adipose tissue by direct action on adipocytes, while repairing neurogenesis in the aged brain. These findings suggest that GDF11 has a pleiotropic effect on an organismal level and that it could be a linking mechanism of rejuvenation between heterochronic parabiosis and calorie restriction. As such, GDF11 could be considered as an important therapeutic candidate for age-related neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders. KEYWORDS: GDF11; adiponectin; aging; calorie restriction; heterochronic parabiosis; rejuvenation Caffeine intake and the risk of recurrent kidney stones in adults, an analysis of 2007-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Sun Y, Wang D, Zhou Q. Eur J Nutr. 2019 Oct 21. doi: 10.1007/s00394-019-02115-0. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 31637466 Abstract PURPOSE: The association between caffeine intake and the risk of recurrent kidney stones is unknown. We examined the association between caffeine intake and the risk of recurrent kidney stones in adults. METHODS: Individuals with history of passing at least one kidney stone were included from 2007 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Recurrent kidney stones were defined using a standard questionnaire and structured dietary recalls were used to determine caffeine intake. The weighted logistic regression was used to assess the association between caffeine intake and the risk of recurrent kidney stones, and the non-linear relationship was explored with restricted cubic splines. Caffeine and dietary confounders (minerals and vitamins) were adjusted for total energy intake with residual model. RESULTS: The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of recurrent kidney stones for per-quartile increment in caffeine intake were 1.15 (1.01-1.31) overall, 1.11 (0.96-1.29) for white race individuals, 1.33 (1.09-1.63) for non-white race individuals, 1.15 (0.97-1.36) for men, 1.24 (1.01-1.53) for women, 1.54 (1.08-2.19) for non-overweight individuals, 1.11 (0.97-1.28) for overweight/obese individuals, 1.13 (0.99-1.29) for caffeine from coffee, and 0.90 (0.79-1.03) for caffeine from non-coffee sources. A linear relationship was found between caffeine intake and the risk of recurrent kidney stones overall and in subgroup analyses. CONCLUSION: Compared with those who reported passing only one kidney stone, caffeine intake was independently and linearly associated with a higher risk of recurrent kidney stones in adults, especially for women, individuals of non-white race and non-overweight subjects. The increased risk may arise from caffeine from coffee. KEYWORDS: Caffeine intake; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey; Recurrent kidney stones Exploring the effect of fasting on age-related diseases Date: October 21, 2019 Source: EMBO Summary: There are many indications that fasting promotes longevity. In recent years, much attention has been devoted to so-called caloric restriction mimetics (CMRs), substances that simulate the health-promoting effects of fasting without the need of life-style change. A study reports the identification of a novel candidate CRM. The substance may prove useful in the further research for the treatment of age-related diseases. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191021111842.htm >>>>>>>>> 3,4-Dimethoxychalcone induces autophagy through activation of the transcription factors TFE3 and TFEB. Chen G, Xie W, Nah J, Sauvat A, Liu P, Pietrocola F, Sica V, Carmona-Gutierrez D, Zimmermann A, Pendl T, Tadic J, Bergmann M, Hofer SJ, Domuz L, Lachkar S, Markaki M, Tavernarakis N, Sadoshima J, Madeo F, Kepp O, Kroemer G. EMBO Mol Med. 2019 Oct 14:e10469. doi: 10.15252/emmm.201910469. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 31609086 Free Article Abstract Caloric restriction mimetics (CRMs) are natural or synthetic compounds that mimic the health-promoting and longevity-extending effects of caloric restriction. CRMs provoke the deacetylation of cellular proteins coupled to an increase in autophagic flux in the absence of toxicity. Here, we report the identification of a novel candidate CRM, namely 3,4-dimethoxychalcone (3,4-DC), among a library of polyphenols. When added to several different human cell lines, 3,4-DC induced the deacetylation of cytoplasmic proteins and stimulated autophagic flux. At difference with other well-characterized CRMs, 3,4-DC, however, required transcription factor EB (TFEB)- and E3 (TFE3)-dependent gene transcription and mRNA translation to trigger autophagy. 3,4-DC stimulated the translocation of TFEB and TFE3 into nuclei both in vitro and in vivo, in hepatocytes and cardiomyocytes. 3,4-DC induced autophagy in vitro and in mouse organs, mediated autophagy-dependent cardioprotective effects, and improved the efficacy of anticancer chemotherapy in vivo. Altogether, our results suggest that 3,4-DC is a novel CRM with a previously unrecognized mode of action. KEYWORDS: TFEB ; TFE3; caloric restriction; caloric restriction mimetic; cardioprotection
  4. Last week
  5. In theory, CE might influence microglial circulation during sleep, since CE stimulates norepinephrine and microglia are inhibited by such substance. But I doubt that norepinephrine during sound sleep is secreted in significant amounts since norepinephrine would tend to inhibit sleep as well... Unless specific conditions exist.
  6. Probably irrelevant to CE. Possibly more important to "General Health and Longevity" than e.g CE. ( I'm a CE agnostic, but a strong believer is the importance of sleep.) -- Saul
  7. After having read the posted article, I wonder about the implications with CE. Cold stimulates the secretion of norepinephrine, which inhibits microglial activity...But the microglials are most active during (deep) sleep, when we usually do not practice CE (otherwise we probably wouldn't be able to sleep at all).
  8. Neurodegenerative Disease Mortality among Former Professional Soccer Players. Mackay DF, Russell ER, Stewart K, MacLean JA, Pell JP, Stewart W. N Engl J Med. 2019 Oct 21. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1908483. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 31633894 Abstract BACKGROUND: Neurodegenerative disorders have been reported in elite athletes who participated in contact sports. The incidence of neurodegenerative disease among former professional soccer players has not been well characterized. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study to compare mortality from neurodegenerative disease among 7676 former professional soccer players (identified from databases of Scottish players) with that among 23,028 controls from the general population who were matched to the players on the basis of sex, age, and degree of social deprivation. Causes of death were determined from death certificates. Data on medications dispensed for the treatment of dementia in the two cohorts were also compared. Prescription information was obtained from the national Prescribing Information System. RESULTS: Over a median of 18 years, 1180 former soccer players (15.4%) and 3807 controls (16.5%) died. All-cause mortality was lower among former players than among controls up to the age of 70 years and was higher thereafter. Mortality from ischemic heart disease was lower among former players than among controls (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.97; P = 0.02), as was mortality from lung cancer (hazard ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.70; P<0.001). Mortality with neurodegenerative disease listed as the primary cause was 1.7% among former soccer players and 0.5% among controls (subhazard ratio [the hazard ratio adjusted for competing risks of death from ischemic heart disease and death from any cancer], 3.45; 95% CI, 2.11 to 5.62; P<0.001). Among former players, mortality with neurodegenerative disease listed as the primary or a contributory cause on the death certificate varied according to disease subtype and was highest among those with Alzheimer's disease (hazard ratio [former players vs. controls], 5.07; 95% CI, 2.92 to 8.82; P<0.001) and lowest among those with Parkinson's disease (hazard ratio, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.17 to 3.96; P = 0.01). Dementia-related medications were prescribed more frequently to former players than to controls (odds ratio, 4.90; 95% CI, 3.81 to 6.31; P<0.001). Mortality with neurodegenerative disease listed as the primary or a contributory cause did not differ significantly between goalkeepers and outfield players (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.43 to 1.24; P = 0.24), but dementia-related medications were prescribed less frequently to goalkeepers (odds ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.89; P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: In this retrospective epidemiologic analysis, mortality from neurodegenerative disease was higher and mortality from other common diseases lower among former Scottish professional soccer players than among matched controls. Dementia-related medications were prescribed more frequently to former players than to controls. These observations need to be confirmed in prospective matched-cohort studies. Midlife physical activity is associated with lower incidence of vascular dementia but not Alzheimer's disease. Hansson O, Svensson M, Gustavsson AM, Andersson E, Yang Y, Nägga K, Hållmarker U, James S, Deierborg T. Alzheimers Res Ther. 2019 Oct 20;11(1):87. doi: 10.1186/s13195-019-0538-4. PMID: 31630687 https://alzres.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s13195-019-0538-4 Abstract BACKGROUND: Physical activity might reduce the risk of developing dementia. However, it is still unclear whether the protective effect differs depending on the subtype of dementia. We aimed to investigate if midlife physical activity affects the development of vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) differently in two large study populations with different designs. METHODS: Using a prospective observational design, we studied whether long-distance skiers of the Swedish Vasaloppet (n = 197,685) exhibited reduced incidence of VaD or AD compared to matched individuals from the general population (n = 197,684) during 21 years of follow-up (median 10, interquartile range (IQR) 5-15 years). Next, we studied the association between self-reported physical activity, stated twice 5 years apart, and incident VaD and AD in 20,639 participants in the Swedish population-based Malmo Diet and Cancer Study during 18 years of follow-up (median 15, IQR 14-17 years). Finally, we used a mouse model of AD and studied brain levels of amyloid-β, synaptic proteins, and cognitive function following 6 months of voluntary wheel running. RESULTS: Vasaloppet skiers (median age 36.0 years [IQR 29.0-46.0], 38% women) had lower incidence of all-cause dementia (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.63, 95% CI 0.52-0.75) and VaD (adjusted HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.33-0.73), but not AD, compared to non-skiers. Further, faster skiers exhibited a reduced incidence of VaD (adjusted HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.16-0.95), but not AD or all-cause dementia compared to slower skiers. In the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study (median age 57.5 years [IQR 51.0-63.8], 60% women), higher physical activity was associated with reduced incidence of VaD (adjusted HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.49-0.87), but not AD nor all-cause dementia. These findings were also independent of APOE-ε4 genotype. In AD mice, voluntary running did not improve memory, amyloid-β, or synaptic proteins. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that physical activity in midlife is associated with lower incidence of VaD. Using three different study designs, we found no significant association between physical activity and subsequent development of AD. KEYWORDS: Alzheimer’s disease; Amyloid-β; Exercise; Physical activity; Vascular dementia Time-restricted eating and age-related muscle loss. Tinsley GM, Paoli A. Aging (Albany NY). 2019 Oct 20. doi: 10.18632/aging.102384. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available. PMID: 31631066 https://www.aging-us.com/article/102384/text >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Time-restricted feeding plus resistance training in active females: a randomized trial. Tinsley GM, Moore ML, Graybeal AJ, Paoli A, Kim Y, Gonzales JU, Harry JR, VanDusseldorp TA, Kennedy DN, Cruz MR. Am J Clin Nutr. 2019 Sep 1;110(3):628-640. doi: 10.1093/ajcn/nqz126. PMID: 31268131 Free PMC Article https://www.crsociety.org/topic/11800-als-cr-updates/?page=21&tab=comments#comment-32676 https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/110/3/628/5527779 Abstract BACKGROUND: A very limited amount of research has examined intermittent fasting (IF) programs, such as time-restricted feeding (TRF), in active populations. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the effects of TRF, with or without β-hydroxy β-methylbutyrate (HMB) supplementation, during resistance training (RT). METHODS: This study employed a randomized, placebo-controlled, reduced factorial design and was double-blind with respect to supplementation in TRF groups. Resistance-trained females were randomly assigned to a control diet (CD), TRF, or TRF plus 3 g/d HMB (TRFHMB). TRF groups consumed all calories between 1200 h and 2000 h, whereas the CD group ate regularly from breakfast until the end of the day. All groups completed 8 wk of supervised RT and consumed supplemental whey protein. Body composition, muscular performance, dietary intake, physical activity, and physiological variables were assessed. Data were analyzed prior to unblinding using mixed models and both intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) frameworks. RESULTS: Forty participants were included in ITT, and 24 were included in PP. Energy and protein intake (1.6 g/kg/d) did not differ between groups despite different feeding durations (TRF and TRFHMB: ∼7.5 h/d; CD: ∼13 h/d). Comparable fat-free mass (FFM) accretion (+2% to 3% relative to baseline) and skeletal muscle hypertrophy occurred in all groups. Differential effects on fat mass (CD: +2%; TRF: -2% to -4%; TRFHMB: -4% to -7%) were statistically significant in the PP analysis, but not ITT. Muscular performance improved without differences between groups. No changes in physiological variables occurred in any group, and minimal side effects were reported. CONCLUSIONS: IF, in the form of TRF, did not attenuate RT adaptations in resistance-trained females. Similar FFM accretion, skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and muscular performance improvements can be achieved with dramatically different feeding programs that contain similar energy and protein content during RT. Supplemental HMB during fasting periods of TRF did not definitively improve outcomes. KEYWORDS: body composition; energy restriction; fat loss; intermittent energy restriction; intermittent fasting; muscle mass; muscular strength; protein; resistance exercise; weight training
  9. Today from Science News: Another article involving the important research being conducted here at the University of Rochester: Microglia had been thought to be active all the time; not so; they are most active during sleep, especially when we are not stressed (low circulating noreprinephine) https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/5584/the-night-gardeners----immune-cells-rewire-repair-brain-while-we-sleep.aspx
  10. Oily Fish Consumption and the Risk of Dyslipidemia in Korean Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study Based on the Health Examinees Gem (HEXA-G) Study. Kim SA, Lee JK, Kang D, Shin S. Nutrients. 2019 Oct 17;11(10). pii: E2506. doi: 10.3390/nu11102506. PMID: 31627478 https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/11/10/2506/htm Abstract Despite the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids from fish or fish oil on cardiovascular diseases, limited information is available regarding the effects of oily fish in the diet on the risk of dyslipidemia. This study aimed to investigate the association between oily fish consumption and the incidence of dyslipidemia among Korean adults included in the Health Examinees Gem (HEXA-G) cohort during 5 years of follow-up. In total, 20,670 participants (5710 men and 14,960 women) were included in this study. The average intake of oily fish including dark meat fish, such as mackerel, pacific saury, and Spanish mackerel, and eel, was estimated using food frequency questionnaires. Oily fish consumption was associated with a significantly lower risk of hypertriglyceridemia in both men (Relative risk (RR) comparing extreme quintiles = 0.75; 95% CI 0.60-0.95; P for trend = 0.0121) and women (RR comparing extreme quintiles = 0.81; 95% CI 0.69-0.96; P for trend = 0.0110) after adjusting for potential confounders. In conclusion, increased consumption of oily fish was significantly associated with a lower risk of hypertriglyceridemia in the general Korean population. Future randomized clinical trials or prospective studies are required to confirm these findings in the Korean or other Asian populations. KEYWORDS: dyslipidemia; fish; hypertriglyceridemia; oily fish; omega-3 fatty acid Insomnia and risk of mortality from all-cause, cardiovascular disease, and cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Ge L, Guyatt G, Tian J, Pan B, Chang Y, Chen Y, Li H, Zhang J, Li Y, Ling J, Yang K. Sleep Med Rev. 2019 Sep 24;48:101215. doi: 10.1016/j.smrv.2019.101215. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PMID: 31630016 https://sci-hub.tw/10.1016/j.smrv.2019.101215 Abstract Growing evidence indicates that insomnia may be associated with mortality. However, these findings have been inconsistent. We systematically searched MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify prospective cohort studies that assessed the association between insomnia disorder/individual insomnia symptoms and the risk of mortality among adults aged ≥18 yrs. We addressed this association using summary hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) calculated using random-effects meta-analysis, and the GRADE approach to rate the certainty of evidence. Twenty-nine cohorts including 1,598,628 individuals (55.3% men; mean age 63.7 yrs old) with a median follow-up duration of 10.5 yrs proved eligible. Difficulty falling asleep (DFA) and non-restorative sleep (NRS) were associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (DFA: HR = 1.13, 95%CI 1.03 to 1.23, p = 0.009, moderate certainty; NRS: HR = 1.23, 95%CI 1.07 to 1.42, p = 0.003, high certainty) and cardiovascular disease mortality (DFA: 1.20, 95%CI: 1.01, 1.43; p = 0.04, moderate certainty; NRS: HR = 1.48, 95%CI 1.06 to 2.06, p = 0.02, moderate certainty). Convincing associations between DFA and all-cause mortality were restricted to the mid to older-aged population (moderate credibility). Insomnia disorder, difficulty maintaining sleep, and early morning awakening proved to be unassociated with all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality. No insomnia symptoms proved to be associated with cancer-related mortality. KEYWORDS: Difficulty falling asleep; Difficulty maintaining sleep; Early morning awakening; Insomnia symptom; Meta-analysis; Mortality; Non-restorative sleep; Prospective cohort study DNA methylation age and physical and cognitive ageing. Maddock J, Castillo-Fernandez J, Wong A, Cooper R, Richards M, Ong KK, Ploubidis GB, Goodman A, Kuh D, Bell JT, Hardy R. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2019 Oct 20. pii: glz246. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glz246. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 31630156 Abstract BACKGROUND: DNA methylation (DNAm) age acceleration (AgeAccel) has been shown to be predictive of all-cause mortality but it is unclear what functional aspect/s of ageing it captures. We examine associations between four measures of AgeAccel in adults aged 45-87 years and physical and cognitive performance and their age-related decline. METHODS: AgeAccelHannum, AgeAccelHorvath, AgeAccelPheno and AgeAccelGrim were calculated in the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD), National Child Development Study (NCDS) and TwinsUK. Three measures of physical (grip strength, chair rise speed and forced expiratory volume in one second[FEV1]) and two measures of cognitive (episodic memory and mental speed) performance were assessed. RESULTS: AgeAccelPheno and AgeAccelGrim, but not AgeAccelHannum and AgeAccelHorvath were related to performance in random effects meta-analyses (n=1388-1685). For example, a one year increase in AgeAccelPheno/AgeAccelGrim was associated with a 0.01ml[95%CI:0.01,0.02]/0.03ml[95%CI:0.01,0.05] lower mean FEV1. In NSHD, AgeAccelPheno and AgeAccelGrim at 53 years were associated with age-related decline in performance between 53 and 69 years as tested by linear mixed models (p<0.05). In a subset of NSHD participants(n=482), there was little evidence that change in any AgeAccel measure was associated with change in performance conditional on baseline performance. CONCLUSIONS: We found little evidence to support associations between the first generation of DNAm-based biomarkers of ageing and age-related physical or cognitive performance in mid-life to early old age. However, there was evidence that the second generation biomarkers, AgeAccelPheno and AgeAccelGrim, could act as makers of an individual's health-span as proposed.
  11. FrederickSebastian

    Cucumber water as a water alternative...

    I like SmartWater...
  12. Todd Allen

    Cucumber water as a water alternative...

    I didn't like the taste of our tap water and put in an under sink reverse osmosis filter system which resolved the issue for me.
  13. Ron Put

    Finally Some Useful Insights about Gut Bacteria and Health

    Ubiome files for Chapter 7: Bankrupt poop-testing startup uBiome is shutting down Ubiome.com is down.
  14. Ron Put

    Tempeh and Seitan?

    Hah! I didn't see that ((embarrassed)). Fair point and thanks for pointing it out. On the other hand, there is really no evidence of any significant adverse effects caused by soy that I am aware of. There are a bunch of studies in the last couple of decades, and while one can argue with the reliability of the soy studies claiming purported health benefits, there is really nothing that I am aware of which would cause me to stop consuming soy (come to think of it, I don't consume all that much of it :) Here is a WebMD page, which kind of states the same: https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/news/20110630/benefits-of-soy-a-mixed-bag#1 "Although evidence was lacking for many of soy's proposed benefits, Utian says that "the good news is that we didn't show it carries any significant risk."
  15. Sibiriak

    Tempeh and Seitan?

    To be consistent, it should be pointed out that the author of the study you cite, Mark Messina, works for the soy industry. Not that that automatically discredits his many papers in support of soy, but it does suggest that his work is likely biased to some extent and that one should be sure to review research and arguments from other sources as well.
  16. Ron Put

    Tempeh and Seitan?

    I thought the soy scare nonsense died a long time ago and only meat industry shills would bring it up now and again on social media.... Soy and Health Update: Evaluation of the Clinical and Epidemiologic Literature "19. Conclusions Soyfoods have become increasingly popular in non-Asian countries. Their versatility allows them to easily be incorporated into Western diets and therefore provides a convenient way to exploit the nutritional advantages of legumes, which often play an underutilized role in North America and many European countries. However, the macronutrient composition of the soybean is different from other legumes. Also, soy protein is higher in quality than other legume proteins and the soybean is a good source of both essential fatty acids. Soy protein also directly lowers circulating LDL-cholesterol levels and may also modestly lower blood pressure. Replacement of commonly-consumed sources of protein in Western diets by soyfoods may also lead to a favorable change in the fatty acid content of the diet. The most distinctive aspect of the soybean is its high isoflavone content. Isoflavones are proposed as having a number of health benefits although not surprisingly, the degree to which the evidence supports these claims varies. For example, there is solid evidence in support of isoflavones alleviating hot flashes and improving arterial health in menopausal women whereas the evidence that they reduce risk of breast and prostate cancer, not surprisingly, is more preliminary. Concerns that the estrogen-like properties of isoflavones produce untoward effects in some subpopulations, such as postmenopausal women, are not supported by the clinical and epidemiologic research. Evidence indicates soyfoods can be safely consumed by all individuals except those who are allergic to soy protein, which is relatively uncommon in comparison to the number of individuals allergic to many other commonly-consumed foods [436,437,438]. When adding soy to the diet it is important to consider the overall nutritional quality of a particular soyfood since many Westernized soyfoods include a variety of non-soy ingredients. There are no formal recommendations for soy intake beyond the 25 g/day soy protein established by the US FDA as the threshold intake for cholesterol reduction. However, population and clinical studies involving adults suggest benefits are associated with approximately two to four servings per day. Ideally, soyfoods are incorporated into the diet by displacing less healthy foods and as part of an overall healthy diet designed to lower risk of chronic disease such as the approach represented by the portfolio diet." And here is something to preempt the GMO scaremongering: Will GMOs Hurt My Body? The Public’s Concerns and How Scientists Have Addressed Them As to gluten, unless you have an allergy, it's fine. I personally avoid gluten at home lately, since I am apparently genetically predisposed to sensitivity and Celiac disease, although I have never exhibited any symptoms. But I eat bread, pizza and pasta when out to certain restaurants (a few times a month).
  17. Saul

    Cucumber water as a water alternative...

    What's wrong with the taste of sink water is the chlorine. Cucumber overnight helps to get rid of that taste. -- Saul
  18. Saul

    Tempeh and Seitan?

    Very true. you cannot "disprove" a theorem that has been correctly proven. Biological "proofs" of results in studies are just strong correlations that have a high probability of being likely on the basis of standard statistics. Thanks for looking this up, Siberiak. The excessive concern over soy in the CR Society dates back to the old CR List; Michael Rae (perhaps our most brilliant member) posted the 2000 Honolulu-Asia Aging Study to the Society, and showed a lot of concern. I was always skeptical. (I suspect that Michael was too, since he was very unhappy when no tofu was available for vegans at the last CR Society meeting.) I encourage people to read the whole of Siberiak's post. -- Saul
  19. Sibiriak

    Tempeh and Seitan?

    Epidemiological studies are not the same as purely logical mathematical proofs. They are rarely "refuted" outright. Generally they are subject to criticism of greater or lesser cogency related to methodological issues, possible confounding factors, doubts raised by other lines of evidence, etc. Regarding the study in question, here are a few examples of critical assessments: Brenda Davis Vesanto Melina, "Becoming Vegan: Comprehensive Edition" Harvard School of Public Health -- Straight Talk About Soy Soy Part 1—Main Controversies by Jack Norris, RD
  20. TomBAvoider

    Tempeh and Seitan?

    No, but since it has NOT been refuted, it is still extremely important. That's how science works. For example if there's a mathematical proof, you don't say "yes, it's PROVED, but can you prove it again?" The burden is on the other party - those who deny. If the study showed very strongly how tofu is damaging to the brain, and someone objects, then the proper procedure is to prove the objection, not to cry out "prove it again!". Disagree? Show a study that disproves it. Absent that, the study STANDS. It stands, because no objection has been successful - that's how a study stands. Basic. So to now ignore it, because someone says "well we tried to disprove it for 20 years and couldn't - but we still won't accept it, prove it AGAIN!". If someone doesn't like the conclusions of a study, the proper way to object is to state a counterproof - if you don't have one, guess what, the study STANDS.
  21. mccoy

    Tempeh and Seitan?

    TomB: one single study in 2000, has it been repeated? It has not been refuted but has it been confirmed?
  22. TomBAvoider

    Tempeh and Seitan?

    And I disagree with mccoy's disagreement. His "additives" and "curdling agents" excuse is the one I referred to when I wrote about various attempts to refute the study (the usual excuse is "aluminum in the preparation process" - but that excuse has been thoroughly debunked. To repeat: there has been NO successful objection to the study. None! There were many threads on the topic of tofu, going back all the way to the email list with extensive discussions, so if anyone is interested, they should search for them. And while more studies are always welcome, there is no reason why we should not accept a study that is extremely well designed and very convincing (especially the observed dose-response effect). Or you can gamble your brain on it. Personally, I won't. It's not that I avoid tofu altogether, just that it is not a regular part of my diet, it's a once in a while, occasional thing. YMMV.
  23. The Evidence and Controversy Between Dietary Calcium Intake and Calcium Supplementation and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies and Randomized Controlled Trials. Yang C, Shi X, Xia H, Yang X, Liu H, Pan D, Sun G. J Am Coll Nutr. 2019 Oct 18:1-19. doi: 10.1080/07315724.2019.1649219. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 31625814 Abstract Objective: Our objective was to synthesize both trial and observational studies and undertake a meta-analysis to explore the associations between calcium from dietary and supplemental intakes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks. Methods: Data sources were from PubMed, Cochrane Central, Scopus, and Web of Science, published from the inception dates up to March 2019. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective cohort studies with data on dietary or supplemental intake of calcium, with or without vitamin D, and cardiovascular outcomes, were included. Results: Of the 1,212 identified studies, 26 prospective cohort studies and 16 RCTs were included. Results of cohort studies reveled that dietary calcium intakes (DCIs) ranging from 200 to 1500 mg/d did not affect the risk of CVD, coronary heart disease (CHD), and stroke (relative risk (RR) RR for CVD = 0.96, 95% CI, 0.87-1.05; RR for CHD = 0.98, 95% CI, 0.88-1.08; RR for stroke = 0.94, 95% CI, 0.85-1.04). Pooled RR of RCTs showed that the risk of CHD due to calcium supplements (CSs) increased 8% (RR = 1.08, 95% CI, 1.02-1.22; I2 = 0.0%) and increased 20% allocated to CSs alone (RR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.08-1.33; I2 = 0.0%). CSs increased the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) by 14% (RR = 1.14, 95% CI, 1.05-1.25; I2 = 0.0%), and CSs alone increased the MI risk 21% (RR = 1.21, 95% CI, 1.08-1.35; I2 = 0.0%). Conclusions: We concluded that calcium intake from dietary sources do not adequately increase the risk of CVD including CHD and stroke, while calcium supplements might raise CHD risk, especially MI. KEYWORDS: Dietary calcium; calcium supplementation; cardiovascular disease; meta-analysis
  24. Todd Allen

    Less is not always more...

    I think Mccoy's suggestion is good but you might do better to not just track body weight but also track other markers of health and fitness. For example using a tape measure or skin fold calipers one can get an estimate of change in body fat helping one know if weight loss is fat or muscle. Tracking physical performance such as how far you jump, how fast you run or how much weight you lift can be helpful too. Or just take a weekly photo in a consistent pose and lighting and tweak your regimen based on what you think of the changes you see.
  25. Todd Allen

    Tempeh and Seitan?

    There is much variation in how people respond to foods. You can learn what works for you through deliberate testing and monitoring. Establish a consistent base line diet tracking how you feel and perform. Then add in a daily serving of seitan for a couple weeks and see if anything noticeable changes. If not you probably don't have an issue with it or gluten. If you suspect an issue eliminate seitan for a couple weeks and then try it again. If you see a repeatable pattern then causation is likely.
  26. mccoy

    Cucumber water as a water alternative...

    IMO, green tea and cucumber water are perfectly all right. Other ways to improve the taste of water: A few drops of lemon A very little stevia in it gives a floreal taste without being sweet
  27. mccoy

    Less is not always more...

    what I would suggest practicing in your case, is a more gradual scheme like the following example: start with 1750 kCal per day, for six months, and check your body weight, If it is not increasing, go on Then go down to 1500 kCals per day, as above check your bodyweight, go on for 6 months even if it stabilizes Then, if your bodyweight stabilized above your ideal weight (let's say, a BMI of 19 or 20 kg/m2), then next: Go down to 1250 kcal and follow again the above procedure. Repeat the above cycles until your weight stabilizes at the ideal BMI (probably 20). Most probably, you should not go lower than this figure of 1250 kCAL, even though you are not tall. It is a long procedure, but patience pays off, in all things, and risks are lowered. A possible risk when doing things in a hurry is that bodyweight homeostasis adjusts itself to very low energy and you don't lose weight.
  1. Load more activity
×