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  1. Yesterday
  2. Gordo

    CV health evaluation

    You should get a heart rate variability monitor - they are pretty cheap and can actually tell you a Lot about your health and rate of aging (as well as tracking heart rate). See the thread here on that...
  3. Gordo

    Octogenarian

    Happy birthday! And just curious, what's your BMI before breakfast? I thought you did CR? 😉
  4. Dean Pomerleau

    Exercise optimization

    Mccoy, To optimize mTOR while practicing CR, you might want to consider adding cold exposure. See this post and the associated links for discussion of how the combination of CR and CE can allow you to have your cake and eat it too, i.e. enjoy the important anabolic benefits of mTOR activity without giving up the benefits of CR to keep insulin and IGF-1 low. Here is a teaser: --Dean
  5. mccoy

    Does IF damage the heart?

    I agree that there not everything adds up in Longo's affirmations. He says that skipping breakfast may be detrimental, then he says that he has breakfast with some tea and jam. What kind of breakfast is that? And why tea and jam? Maybe he omitted toasted bread together with jam. My personal contention here is that well-trained instinct rules. If we are not hungry in the morning, we should follow our neurological signals and not to eat breakfast.
  6. mccoy

    Exercise optimization

    Ron, I'm just making an experiment in muscle hypertrophy (which is not being too succesfull though) Large dosages of AAs may be beneficial just after training, and maybe the day after,. I too believed in the alleged detrimental effects of mTOR upregulation from protein intake. There are many hints that such a model is too simplistic though. Also, downregulating mTOR too much may definitely be uneahlty and anti-longevity. And mTOR upregulation in skeletal muscle is arguable healthy., especially so to counteract older-age anabolic resistance and myiopenia. Again, methionine moderation = low IGF-1, but a few authoritative sources affirm that too low of an IGF-1 may be detrimental and that there is an optimum value which is not too low , as discussed in another thread. Probably we'd need to optimize our own protein and methionine intake to our own IGF-1. I've yet to have myself analyzed.
  7. Ron Put

    Does IF damage the heart?

    Most studies I am aware of of which associate skipping breakfast with higher mortality rates, also associate skipping breakfast with increased unhealthy behavior. For instance, the Japanese study I believe Longo was referring to indicated that a significantly larger percentage of those skipping breakfast were shift workers, smokers, heavier drinkers, etc., than those who ate breakfast. The Greek study which came out more recently didn't specifically address correlation with bad habits, to my recollection (and I didn't read the whole thing). So, those who skip breakfast in the general population are not necessarily doing it because they are practicing CR or time-restricted eating, but more likely because it's reflective of generally less healthy lifestyles. I am aware of the circadian rhythm studies, but generally those seem to indicate that your clock starts with the first bite, so I am unsure if it has to necessarily coincide with the raising of the sun.
  8. Ron Put

    Octogenarian

    Congratulations and happy birthday, Saul! I don't know you, but you are an inspiration. May we have a similar exchange in 30 years :)
  9. Ron Put

    Exercise optimization

    Perhaps a silly question, but why would anyone on a CR forum choose to bulk up on a full daily dose of methionine at one fell swoop? There is quite a bit of evidence that restricting methionine and some other BCAAs may be an integral part of the process taking place during CR (which seems to be largely due to reduced protein intake). See for example https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5008916/
  10. There should be a rational mechanistic explanation for the anomaly depicted in the graph. In lieu of reasonable mechanistic explanation (and I have difficulties finding one), IMO it's just an anomaly, due to statistical variability of subgroups, measurement errors, confounding factors and so on.
  11. mccoy

    Low fat and tocopherols

    Right, I edited the post: one small almond
  12. mccoy

    Multiple spice mix

    Another spice which I just discovered I had stashed at the bottom of the drawer, I think in English it's called dill Thus, my med spice mix now has expanded into 8 components: Rosemary Basil Parsely Thyme Oregano Sage onion herb Marjoran nutmeg Dill
  13. This is surprising: the study did report results at finer-grained breakpoints (8 sleep ranges instead of 3), but it was not a U-shaped curve with mortality. The lowest and highest sleeping groups survived much better than the 2nd lowest and 2nd highest, and not that much worse than the groups in the middle ranges (with confidence intervals that don't go way into bad territory so it doesn't look like just randomness due to low n). The differences between adjacent groups may not have been statistically significant, but when graphed the overall 8-group bar-chart still represents a striking departure from what you would expect for a U-shaped dose-response (see attached bar chart, fig 1 of the paper). In numbers, those sleeping >7.5hr (n=15) had 89% survival (95% CI 81-91%) vs those sleeping 7-7.5hr (n=31) having 58% (45-71%). The 81-91% range for >7.5hr doesn't seem that much worse than the 85-94% CI for the pooled 5-6.5hr group. If this were some weird quirk due to the low n, I would expect a bigger CI that ranged down further into bad survival %s. I didn't see any discussion of this turning down of the ends of the U curve in glancing very briefly through the later parts of the paper. But this doesn't match any of the other sleep research I've ever heard about. It seems so odd, it's hard for me to take this paper as a reason to think that >6.5hr is the point at which more starts to become bad, as suggested by their pooled 3-group analysis (and the figure 2 that Ron posted above). So until I see some study that replicated this, I'm still going to go with 7.5hr of actual sleep measured by a tracking device as the rough amount where more sleep may start to become a negative, as suggested by the hunter gatherer research reported in the Walker book and the studies described by Parsley. My own sleep averages around 6.5hrs (measured w/ Emfit QS under mattress + Garmin Fr235 at wrist). Karl
  14. Ron, thank you for the https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3010336/#!po=1.21951 study. This is the best direct answer yet to the question I posed in the 1st post. As Michael said, it will be some time before we have lots of studies using actual sleep measurement and long-term health followup because we didn't have measurement a long time ago and what measurement we had (sleep studies) were very sleep disruptive. We obviously didn't have FitBits and Apple Watches in the 1970s, but even if whatever wrist actigraphs we did have were systematically different than what people use now, it is clearly a strict improvement on self-reported time-in-bed, and the study demonstrates exactly what I hypothesized in the 1st post: It's notable that getting too little sleep is much worse than getting too much, based on the pasted graph. It seems odd that the highest breakpoint they used was 6.5hrs. Given the other science suggesting 7-7.5hr as optimal (the studies Kirk Parsley described in the linked podcast above) or 6-7.5hr as optimal (some of the modern hunter-gatherer studies described in Matthew Walker's book I recommended above), it seems strange they wouldn't separate the above 6.5hr group with a breakpoint at ~7.5hr. I haven't had a chance to read the paper yet, but will look at this when I do. Maybe there weren't enough subjects in the above 7.5hr range. But if there were, one hopes their outcomes don't drag down those in the 6.5-7.5hr range. Tangentially, I note that Dreem's website homepage says the Dreem2 is available now, but when you click through to the order page, it still says not available yet and has a place to register your email to be notified when that changes. Karl
  15. Sex Differences In Postprandal Responses To Different Dairy Products On Lipoprotein Subclasses: A Randomized Controlled Cross-Over Trial. Hansson P, Holven KB, Øyri LKL, Brekke HK, Gjevestad GO, Thoresen M, Ulven SM. Br J Nutr. 2019 Jun 18:1-25. doi: 10.1017/S0007114519001429. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 31208475 Abstract Men have earlier first time event of coronary heart disease, and higher postprandial triglyceride response, compared to women. The aim of this exploratory sub-study was to investigate if intake of meals with the same amount of fat from different dairy products affects postprandial lipoprotein subclasses differently in healthy women and men. Thirty-three women and 14 men were recruited to a randomized controlled cross-over study with four dairy meals consisting of butter, cheese, whipped cream or sour cream, corresponding to 45 grams of fat (approximately 60 energy percent). Blood samples were taken at 0, 2, 4 and 6 hours postprandially. Lipoprotein subclasses were measured using nuclear magnetic resonance, and analyzed using a linear mixed model. Sex had a significant impact on the response in M-VLDL (P=0.04), S-LDL (P=0.05), XL-HDL (P=0.009), and L-HDL (P=0.001) particle concentration (P), with women having an overall smaller increase in M-VLDL-P, a larger decrease in S-LDL-P, and a larger increase in XL-, and L-HDL-P compared to men, independent of meal. Men showed a decrease in XS-VLDL-P compared to women after intake of sour cream (P&lt;0.01). In men only, XS-VLDL-P decreased after intake of sour cream compared to all other meals (vs. butter: P=0.001; vs. cheese: P&lt;0.04; vs. whipped cream: P=0.006). Meals with the same amount of fat from different dairy products induce different postprandial effects on lipoprotein subclass concentrations in men and women. KEYWORDS: CHD Coronary heart disease CRP C-reactive protein CVD Cardiovascular disease E% Energy percent HDL-C High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol iAUC Incremental area under the curve IDL Intermediate-density lipoprotein IS Ischemic stroke L Large LDL-C Low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol LPL Lipoprotein lipase M Medium MFGM Milk fat globule membrane MI Myocardial infarction P Particle concentration S Small TC Total cholesterol TG Triglyceride TRL Triglyceride-rich lipoprotein XL Very large XS Very small XXL Extremely large; HDL; LDL; VLDL; butter; cheese; cream; dairy matrix; lipoprotein subclasses; postprandial; sex differences; sour cream Joint Analysis of Metabolite Markers of Fish Intake and Persistent Organic Pollutants in Relation to Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Swedish Adults. Shi L, Brunius C, Bergdahl IA, Johansson I, Rolandsson O, Donat Vargas C, Kiviranta H, Hanhineva K, Åkesson A, Landberg R. J Nutr. 2019 Jun 18. pii: nxz068. doi: 10.1093/jn/nxz068. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 31209490 Abstract BACKGROUND: There is conflicting evidence regarding the association between fish intake and type 2 diabetes (T2D) incidence, possibly owing to measurement errors in self-reported intake and coexposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) present in fish. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify plasma metabolites associated with fish intake and to assess their association with T2D risk, independently of POPs, in Swedish adults. METHODS: In a case-control study nested in the Swedish Västerbotten Intervention Programme, fasting plasma samples from 421 matched T2D case-control pairs of men and women aged 30-60 y at baseline and 10-y follow-up samples from a subset of 149 pairs were analyzed using untargeted metabolomics. Moreover, 16 plasma POPs were analyzed for the 149 pairs who had repeated samples available. Fish-related plasma metabolites were identified using multivariate modelling and partial correlation analysis. Reproducibility of metabolites and metabolite patterns, derived via principal component analysis (PCA), was assessed by intraclass correlation. A unique component of metabolites unrelated to POPs was dissected by integrating metabolites and POPs using 2-way orthogonal partial least squares regression. ORs of T2D were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: We identified 31 metabolites associated with fish intake that had poor to good reproducibility. A PCA-derived metabolite pattern strongly correlated with fish intake (ρ = 0.37, P < 0.001) but showed no association with T2D risk. Integrating fish-related metabolites and POPs led to a unique metabolite component independent of POPs, which tended to be inversely associated with T2D risk (OR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.54, 1.02, P = 0.07). This component mainly consisted of metabolites reflecting fatty fish intake. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that fatty fish intake may be beneficial for T2D prevention, after removing the counteractive effects of coexposure to POPs in Swedish adults. Integrating metabolite markers and POP exposures appears a promising approach to advance the understanding of associations between fish intake and T2D incidence. EYWORDS: O2PLS modeling; fish biomarkers; metabolomics; nested case-control study; persistent organic pollutants; type 2 diabetes
  16. Todd Allen

    Low fat and tocopherols

    Careful!!! DON'T eat the entire almond! Your Cronometer plan allows for 1 g almond. A typical almond weighs 1.2 g.
  17. mccoy

    Low fat and tocopherols

    The major contributors of the fat quota, 19.5 grams, are the breads (wheat and buckwheat), garbanzo beans, spinach. No room for oils, seeds, nuts, except a single small almond, is left. This is an example of an extreme diet which may be justified by particular targets. both omega 3s and omega 6s are far below the RDAs. According to cronometer the only supplementation in addition to the polyunsaturated fats would be B12, D, calcium, maybe choline. by excluding breads and incuding more simple sugars we may perhaps make room to very few oils, maybe...
  18. mccoy

    Low fat and tocopherols

    This is the results of my first attempt of a cronometer simulation. Tocopherols are not a problem with spinach and whole grain breads, but to fully hit the target of 10% fats the only fat foot allowed is...one small almond!!! No kidding, numbers speak by tehmselves. I wonder if there are really people, aside Dr. Mc Dougall, who are able to follow such a diet. 10% fats, 18% protein, 72% carbs I included nonfat greek yogurt for protein, without that maybe a 10% fats, 10% protein may be achieved.
  19. mccoy

    Octogenarian

    Notwithstanding the use of amphetamynes, which might have had negative repercussion to his longevity (but not to the number of scientific papers he authored and co-authored). Maybe he might have lived longer, maybe not.
  20. Well, you may not find it compelling, but it's one of the best studies around I am aware of. Of course they will have a disclaimer about the accuracy of wrist-based actigraphy compared to a lab sleep study setting, which measures your your brain waves and eye movement, among other things. Actigraphy may not be as accurate, but it's still pretty good and a great deal more accurate than self-reporting, which most other studies use. It also jives with another, more recent study in protected tribal subjects, also using actigraphy, which found that the average amount of sleep they get was about 6 hours and 20 minutes or so, and that their waking time was not light-dependent, but it corresponded to the coldest time in the morning. (I don't have the time to find it up now.)
  21. Last week
  22. Mechanism

    Octogenarian

    Happy Birthday Saul! i think you are just getting started 😊
  23. mccoy

    Multiple spice mix

    This is a thread which has been inspired by Dean's 20 spices mix which he cited in the other thread on EVOO, I believe that we are all, to a greater or lesser extent, convinced about the validity of the xenohormetic theory, according to which the typical molecules of spices, which often are just phytotoxins, are poisonous to insects and other small lifeforms but beneficial to humans, in very moderate amounts as used in food preparations and dressing. So, having ready at hand such a xenhormetic mix as Dean does is sure an example to follow. Now, with all the caveats on the possible loss of properties of dried and ground spices, which we can sure alleviate by eating some fresh ones, quantity (number of spices) arguably equals diversification and a possibly greater range of effect of the hormetic principles/molecules. To make it short, I started reading the ingredients of the curry powder I have in my kitchen. It's 15 different spices already ground together. On top of that I prepared a mix of 7 more common mediterranean spices plus nutmeg. To these, we may add cinnamom maybe in a separate container to use in drinks (I use it in my cacao drink), but I saw cinnamom is also used in some ethnic spice mixes . Plus I use some occasional more expensive spices like saffron and vanilla. It adds to 23 different spices in two different containers, plus cinnamom= 24, plus others to mix occasionally. I'm going to prepare a list to which we may add more and see it is possible to reach a number of 30 spices to use daily for a very wide range xenohormetic effect. Dean's idea is very good in that it's convenient to have one or two containers only and we dont' forget to use single spices. 15 spices found in a commercial curry (supermarket): turmeric coriander cumin fenugreek ginger garlic cloves pimiento senape laurel chili fennel seed cardamom white peper black pepper 7 Mediterranean spices I could find and mix, plus nutmeg: Rosemary Basil Parsely Thyme Oregano Sage onion herb Marjoran nutmeg Other possible ones, which I could not find ground, are anice,seeds star anice, also there are pink and green pepper. And who knows how many more ethnic spices...
  24. Saul

    Octogenarian

    Thanks! My wife and I had part of a Japanese cheescake last night to celebrate. 😁
  25. TomBAvoider

    Octogenarian

    Happy Birthday Saul! You seem in excellent health. It's good to hear that you're still teaching math, and perhaps even doing math? Paul Erdos would refer to any mathematician who stopped doing math as "died" - and any who actually died as "left", but he himself lived till 83. If you want to assure longevity, you might want to switch your mathematical research to partial differential equations, as that seems to ensure a long life, which is what the Russian mathematician Sergey Nikolsky who lived to 107 did: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergey_Nikolsky He was regularly lecturing at 92, and working at 100, so you still have a way to go, Saul, to beat that record. I expect you'll live much longer than to 107, considering that your diet/lifestyle must be much better than whatever poor Sergey Nikolsky managed, as long as you carefully choose your mathematical endeavors 🙂
  26. mccoy

    Does IF damage the heart?

    Now, after the recent thread on postprandial tachycardia, a mechanistic principle for CVD hazard may be invoked simply by the fact that larger meals (inevitable situation when intake is not spread out throughout the day) may cause significant increase in heart BPMs. This may become more pronounced with a single meal per day. As I commented in the other thread, I could not eat a single meal because of the bloating and the consequent heart rate increase. Is such a BPMs increase comparable to physical activity? I believe not, that's pretty unpleasant in my experience. Re. Gallstones, just today I've been talking meals with a medical colleague at work, the mechanistic cause of gallstones might be the concentration of the gall fluid when it is not secreted with a certain frequency and the easier precipitation of salts and minerals in it.
  27. mccoy

    Octogenarian

    That's a low carb chocolate cake!
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