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  2. I'm definitely trying an HC/HF regime and report back.
  3. Today
  4. Ron Put

    The obesity wars

    Hm, the big money is actually the food industry and Fiegal's research is used by them to spearhead a campaign to discredit its critics. I read most of the article Todd linked and after doing a couple of more searches, my take is that Fiegal is creating a largely straw man argument and slaying it, to paint herself as the victim. In her article, she does not address the research used against her findings. Instead, she essentially keeps presenting herself as the naive victim of a vindictive and powerful Goliath, branding the Harvard panels as witchhunts, and personally attacking the credentials and motives of those who disagree. Yet, she was invited to be on these panels and refused to accept. A brief perusal of the talks appears to show a data-driven argument against her research and conclusions, which is a perfectly fine method of scientific discourse. She could have participated in the panels and defended her research and positions. Instead, she is going on the attack, claiming malicious intent on part of her detractors. It is important to note that she was not censured in any way, no organized letter-writing campaigns were conducted to pressure journals to retract or banish her. Her studies received wide dissemination in the press, with a headline about the "Big Fat Lie" in the NY Times and her claims have been quoted widely, like this in AARP: "A growing body of evidence points in this direction. In 2005, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looked at body mass index or BMI — an estimate of a person's body fat calculated by height and weight — and found that overweight people [with a BMI of 25 to 29.9] had less chance of dying than people with a normal BMI or a low BMI. For those over age 70 the evidence was even stronger. Says Katherine M. Flegal, CDC senior research scientist and lead author of the 2005 study, "The lower your BMI the worse your chances of survival." My take is that she is reopening this to take advantage of the Left's circling the wagons around the CDC. Also, much has changed since 2013 and wokism is prevailing today, with a cottage industry of "peer review" "scientific" journals devoted to attacking claims that obesity is unhealthy as an example of "institutional" discrimination.
  5. I have seen some diurnal research but have never been convinced enough to make a change. I time-restrict to 6-8 hours on most days, starting at about noon or early afternoon, since I am always hungry at night and not hungry in the morning. But perhaps I'll shift my nuts and avocado (and flax?) to the end of my day and see if it makes a difference in three months.
  6. The System allowed me to paste this figure, which is very much IT with the thread. From the Kessler et al. article cited in the sigma nutrition blog. Published: 08 March 2017The effect of diurnal distribution of carbohydrates and fat on glycaemic control in humans: a randomized controlled trial From the graph it is evident that a HF (high fat/Low carb) dinner is always very beneficial, in both groups with impaired and non-impaired Glucose tolerance. Bottom line: The optimal distribution of carbs and fats across the day may so constitute a viable strategy to decrease BG concentrations. Now, shall the higher fats concentration at dinner impinge too much on cholesterol levels? Maybe not so much if the fats are taken overall not high and unsaturated. This is something very worth trying, maybe having 3 meals a day where the last one is definitely hypocaloric and low-carb
  7. Todd Allen

    The obesity wars

    What boggles my mind is the notion that observational studies attack, threaten or even mean anything at all. They merely suggest statistical correlations. In this case, it is quite possible that among the entire population studied longevity was best on average among the overweight as characterized by BMI. But the result could be confounded by factors as discussed in the threads you have referenced such that the commonly held notion of getting fatter being generally detrimental to longevity is still true. This article describes individuals and institutions supposedly devoted to science engaging in noxious ideological campaigning instead of thoughtful discussions of data, methods of analysis and potential confounders producing unexpected results. To the degree the allegations are true it is a very sorry state of affairs.
  8. Sibiriak, that's a pretty good article which summarizes the possible optimization of BG by meals patterns. The article confirms the known fact that it's better too eat carbs at breakfast, adding that it's also best to eat little at night. The effect of meal frequency is more confused, since the article cites studies which would tend to confute the thesis that fewer meals per day improve glucose status (although, OMAD is not contemplated in the studies). From the graph below, an optimization strategy could be eat a little more at breakfast and more carbs, less carbs at lungh and less and very little carbs at dinner, especially if the dinner is a late one. By the way, the fact that lately I switched my dinners to later hours may be the cause for a worse glucose status. I cannot paste the graph because the system only allows me 61 kb, I don't know if there is a quota in the 24 hours...
  9. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyOGvKe1e1Y Papers referenced in the video: Growth hormone-releasing hormone disruption extends lifespan and regulates response to caloric restriction in mice https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24175... Glucose regulation and oxidative stress in healthy centenarians https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12543... Distribution of blood glucose and prevalence of diabetes among centenarians and oldest-old in China: based on the China Hainan Centenarian Cohort Study and China Hainan Oldest-old Cohort Study https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32643... Prevalence and Ethnic Pattern of Diabetes and Prediabetes in China in 2013 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28655... Families enriched for exceptional longevity also have increased health-span: findings from the long life family study https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24350... HOMA calculator: https://www.omnicalculator.com/health...
  10. Literature review: Meal Timing & Blood Sugar (June 21, 2021)
  11. Sibiriak

    The obesity wars

    Thanks. Flegal got some pretty vicious and arguably unfair push back on her shocking conclusion that " overweight [not obesity] was associated with significantly lower all-cause mortality. " Not surprising, really. Established public health policy was under attack. And big money at stake. “Studies such as Flegal's [2013] are dangerous, Willett says, because they could confuse the public and doctors, and undermine public policies to curb rising obesity rates. ‘There is going to be some percentage of physicians who will not counsel an overweight patient because of this,’ he says. Worse, he says, these findings can be hijacked by powerful special-interest groups, such as the soft-drink and food lobbies, to influence policy-makers.” Debate raged on Flegal's controversial work back in 2013, and now, eight years later, she seems to want to stir things up again, or at least set the record straight from her perspective. Of course, the science has moved steadily on since then, as we have discussed here in various threads such as: Relationship Between BMI and Disease, and Longevity Optimal Weight for Longevity
  12. Todd Allen

    The obesity wars

    An article which paints a remarkably unflattering portrait of Walter Willett and the Harvard School of Public Health. The obesity wars and the education of a researcher: A personal account
  13. Yesterday
  14. Saul

    Fluoride (redux!!)

    Maybe -- but I doubt it. I remember going to my semi-annual dental cleaning -- and after she finished, feeling some junk between two molars that i could easily remove with my interdental brushes. The cleaner got rid of it. She retired less than s year later. -- Saul
  15. No, I was actually completely confused, as I've been reading about the optical tech.... Just ignore me :) I had seen a 20% accuracy and assumed it was some sort of optical, as it seemed high and that's the subject I had been reading about a couple of days ago. I didn't realize that that's the same accuracy as a regular glucose meter.
  16. Ron, are you sure medical CGMs use optical and not electrical devices? That's a needle inserted into the skin, not just a sensor above it...
  17. That would be pretty good, shedding some adiposity but saving the muscle tissue...
  18. So, Withings just received approval to show the metric in the US (it's been available in Europe for over a year) on their Body Cardio scale. I've been experimenting with it for a bit and mine is pretty good as far as PWV Age goes, which is the metric they use (I imagine because the FDA won't let them show m/s). Anyone else here using it, or measuring PWV? I was recently thinking about taurine supplementation and have started taking about 2g of it, as I am vegan and I have not seen reports of adverse effects. Anyone else here taking taurine, or with opinions? Similarly, I have started supplementing with l-citruline, about 5g per day and it appears that my PWV values are noticeably trending down since I started. Any opinions on long-term use? Finally, I usually weigh myself in the morning, right after or during my coffee consumption. Since caffeine in coffee adversely affects PWV, I am considering if I should make the dramatic change to decaf. Strangely, I've seen a study where neither green tea nor black tea has an adverse effect on PWV.
  19. Yeah, this censorship by the private companies that today own and control the largest public forums in history is dangerous to society and democracy. As these monopolies have become aligned with a specific political ideology, they are acting as surrogates for the state in exercising media control and political censorship. Germany's National Socialists successfully used and rewarded private businesses in a similar fashion and Russia and China employ the same scheme today, since abandoning the command economy model. The censorship and ideological propaganda already had a profound effect in destabilizing Western societies and making acceptable public policies unimaginable a decade ago.
  20. Ron Put

    Fluoride (redux!!)

    I had seen a study on that when I searched. Here it is (it's done by Waterpik, so take it for what it is): Conclusions: The Waterpik Water Flosser and manual toothbrush removes significantly more plaque from tooth surfaces (whole mouth, marginal, approximal, facial, and lingual) than interdental brushes and a manual toothbrush after a single use.
  21. Based on what I've read, I don't believe the accuracy of the optical glucose monitors is sufficient for precise monitoring, which is why I questioned Attia's claim about spikes. The CGMs appear to have value in establishing less granular trends during the day, which is fine for me, but not compelling enough to jump on the bandwagon yet. I definitely replace my fitness watch with one that includes CGM when they appear. There were rumors about Samsung bringing one out this year, but now it seems unlikely. There is a more reliable report that Apple will introduce it in 2022. If I may suggest simply removing EVOO and dairy from your home pantry? Restaurants, unless a daily event, are OK :) Measure before and then give it three months and see if you get a significant drop. It worked well for me. I still eat almonds and walnuts daily and avocado a few times a week, but I don't use oil for cooking at home. Apple cider vinegar and spices make anything taste good to me.
  22. Saul

    Fluoride (redux!!)

    Inter-dental brushes work well to remove grit below the gum line -- I use them and an electric rotary tooth cleaning toll for brushing my teeth, I do these two things twice daily, and don't floss. Works well for me. (but I have large gaps between teeth -- if your teeth are very close (as is so for Dean), inter-dental brushes won't work well; then you need to floss. -- Saul
  23. 23 well-ripped (7% adiposity) would be good, but pretty hard to maintain, almost impossible with my present workload, possible after retirement and exercising conspicuosly...
  24. Well, maybe 23 then. 😊 I bet you'd look ripped.
  25. Sibiriak, the hypocaloric solution is sure a valid one, but now I weight about 71 kg with a BMI of 25, going down below 22 would mean to loose at least 9 kg of weight, which I deem too low for me, it will happen only if I get injured or seriously sick...At that bodyweight I look seriously emaciated. Hence my search for alternative solutions.
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