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  2. Dean Pomerleau

    Haemoglobin levels

    Shezian, I've been vegan for ~18 years. My serum iron is always in the normal range, but both my haemoglobin and ferritin tend to be near the bottom of the reference range (e.g. ~13.2 g/dL for haemoglobin and ~30 ng/mL for ferritin). I do supplement with iron (65mg elemental iron twice per week), mostly because I donate blood every 3 months and if I don't my haemoglobin will be too low to qualify, especially for double red donation. After I donate (esp. after double reds), I definitely notice that my aerobic capacity is reduced for a week or so while by haemoglobin regenerates. But I never get sick. If your haemoglobin is lowish but near the bottom end of the reference range and you aren't experiencing symptoms of anemia (e.g. low energy, unusual shortness of breath / "heavy legs" climbing stairs), I'd say your illnesses and lower haemoglobin are probably unrelated. On the flip side, as pesco-vegan with weird haemoglobin, I don't think it would be unreasonable for you to consider modest iron supplementation - e.g. an RDAs worth of iron ever couple days. --Dean
  3. Yesterday
  4. Hm, it should in fact be free. If successful, it would be tremendously profitable for the service provider. I personally wouldn't do it if free, as I don't believe it is likely to be beneficial. But others may have different take and priorities. But the million dollars price tag makes it look less like a study and more like physhing for suckers....
  5. Ron Put

    Haemoglobin levels

    I'd try to get iron from food, rather than supplements (learn to like cumin :) If you don't have significant symptoms, such as shortness of breath, heart palpitations, etc., I would go with your doctor says and not worry.
  6. Thanks for the study, Sibiriak. Interesting. As to "living in the Antarctic year round versus keeping the thermostat at home low," my guess is that their cold exposure, even in the Antarctic, was less significant than wearing a cold vest for hours each day. What is the surface temperature of the cold vest? “Given the small number of participants, the results of our study should be viewed with caution,” explains Alexander Stahn, adding: “They do, however, provide important information, namely – and this is supported by initial findings in mice – that extreme environmental conditions can have an adverse effect on the brain and, in particular, the production of new nerve cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.”
  7. Ron Put

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    Humans are just another animal (as a somewhat related aside, I highly recommend "Sapiens" by Yuval Noah Harari, if you haven't read it) and it doesn't make evolutionary sense that value-judgments are exclusive to us. My dog makes value judgments every day. But as I noted above, the ability to construct complex value systems is not needed - prokaryotic cells may not be capable of value judgments (as we are using the term here), but will still defend their life by reacting to irritants and by aggregating into colonies to increase their chance of survival.
  8. AlPater

    aging protein waves in blood

    The paper is in PubMed this morning: Undulating changes in human plasma proteome profiles across the lifespan. Lehallier B, Gate D, Schaum N, Nanasi T, Lee SE, Yousef H, Moran Losada P, Berdnik D, Keller A, Verghese J, Sathyan S, Franceschi C, Milman S, Barzilai N, Wyss-Coray T. Nat Med. 2019 Dec;25(12):1843-1850. doi: 10.1038/s41591-019-0673-2. Epub 2019 Dec 5. PMID: 31806903 https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2019/09/01/751115.full.pdf Abstract Aging is a predominant risk factor for several chronic diseases that limit healthspan1. Mechanisms of aging are thus increasingly recognized as potential therapeutic targets. Blood from young mice reverses aspects of aging and disease across multiple tissues2-10, which supports a hypothesis that age-related molecular changes in blood could provide new insights into age-related disease biology. We measured 2,925 plasma proteins from 4,263 young adults to nonagenarians (18-95 years old) and developed a new bioinformatics approach that uncovered marked non-linear alterations in the human plasma proteome with age. Waves of changes in the proteome in the fourth, seventh and eighth decades of life reflected distinct biological pathways and revealed differential associations with the genome and proteome of age-related diseases and phenotypic traits. This new approach to the study of aging led to the identification of unexpected signatures and pathways that might offer potential targets for age-related diseases.
  9. Sibiriak

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    It's humans that make the value-judgment "life is a good in itself". Who else?
  10. Ron Put

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    Who said anything about "human" values? And technically, life is a prerequisite for all values....
  11. Sibiriak

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    "life is a good " is a value- judgment, which, as you say, most people make since life is the basis of all human values.
  12. Ron Put

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    For the majority of living things, life is a good in itself, as it is the entire world. Those for whom it is not, have the power to end it (and thus their world). Or they can, while alive and sentient, conjure up a substitute good.
  13. Sibiriak

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    Which is to say life has no meaning. Meaning is a relational concept X means Y. Signifier and signified. "X means X" is essentially meaningless. Life is "full of sound and fury, / Signifying nothing."
  14. Ron Put

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    pot
  15. Ron Put

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    Yep, except i wouldn't use the term "anthropic." The world, as one knows it, is born and dies with one's sentience. The world (according to Ron) was born when I first perceived it, and it will die when I stop perceiving it. The same for the world of my dog. Or, the world of every other sentient being. Which is why I try to not participate in the destruction of other worlds (a.k.a. "vegetarian"). I am certainly not a theist, and based on the above, I don't see the need for theism. Technically, theism conflicts with sentience, as each sentient being is "The Creator." The meaning of life is life itself. And the continuous understanding thereof.
  16. Sibiriak

    aging protein waves in blood

    Thanks Ron! There's also a downloadable full pdf text here: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2019/09/01/751115.full.pdf
  17. Ron Put

    aging protein waves in blood

    Yes, very interesting. For those interested, here is the full text of the Nature article, courtesy of Springer Nature Sharedit: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0673-2.epdf?referrer_access_token=KNoV30mwVcJt6caMhLFJBNRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0MI3Y1S6inq9eI1Y5GonWP6JFlmolgaRSsCpoEwhbJBYMH7Psy1aPzylwS8ZZ6F4MusemkSmr6GNez365YT4LlwlMDiaH6S2jbZy3StYDOYe-K6Q_Zf1oetyeePsgjBibL1Z51rQPflLfE7LI_mThA_CMTHd6G7l4QDcPo7BNOG2mqi9f11mecGTk4yg7m6km5nj7Gge3sH_w_ZVyhrU4VQ9pwctqxtQHTVmNmKN2iQTPSy15_BusAmqap6Jct5oOXojCdItaWghzW-MCiO8y1Mbjyk4VUnAD95IB0Lwrs7PA%3D%3D&tracking_referrer=www.npr.org
  18. crinded

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    Simple and Neat
  19. Saul

    aging protein waves in blood

    Very interesting post, Corybroo. -- Saul
  20. Last week
  21. Hi All my life l have had slightly lower than normal haemoglobin and normal iron and ferritin. After investigation it was found found that 25% of my haemoglobin in my body is a different structure, in other words a variant of some kind, well its called Tulon, which is very rare. But since going vegan with fish/seafood 3 times per week, my haemoglobin has dropped a bit more, and my Iron is normal but on the lower side. Have been sick a few a times this year with colds and the flu, and sore neck glands thats seem to stay sore. Its quiet unusual for me to be sick this often, but could the lower haemoglobin levels also be a result of the body fighting infection? Does anyone else have low haemoglobin? My doctor sais that if my iron is normal, then nothing to worry about. So l guess even taking an iron supplement is of no point correct? Thanks heaps for reading and would love to hear. your thoughts.
  22. Not a reason for me though, at least not yet. The study points out other factors in play beyond cold such as extreme social isolation. Perhaps things like limited sunshine and lack of fresh food might also be relevant. Even if it is just the cold there is a significant difference between living in the Antarctic year round versus keeping the thermostat at home low and going outside for brief periods under dressed for the weather.
  23. The New York Times reports on a recent study. The study is pretty small (21 fit older men who have been avid joggers their whole adult lives). Basic takeaway, it looks like exercise helps reduce inflammation overall and keeps old muscles looking younger.
  24. One more reason for Ron Put to avoid cold exposure: How extreme environmental conditions affect the human brain Study from the Antarctic Neumayer-Station III https://www.mpib-berlin.mpg.de/en/media/2019/12/how-extreme-environmental-conditions-affect-the-human-brain
  25. Scientists Find Surprising Age-Related Protein Waves In Blood https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/12/05/785065299/scientists-find-surprising-age-related-protein-waves-in-blood I thought aging was a linear process. The above article reports finding three distinct waves of change. First wave in 30s, second around 60, and third around 80. One hope is to develop a personalized aging clock. "With this flood of new data about blood proteins, it's a daunting task to figure out whether each one causes aging, slows it down or is merely a result of the aging process." This research "is really the first step in categorizing and cataloging the age-related biomarkers,"
  26. For anyone with a strong urge to try an unproven anti-aging therapy and a spare million bucks, a company called Libella Gene Therapeutics (headquartered in a strip mall in Manhattan Kansas) will enroll you in their gene therapy "clinical trial" which aims to lengthen your telomeres, similar to one of the treatments that Liz Parrish from Bioviva attempted on herself. Here is a description of the trial: https://onezero.medium.com/scientists-dodge-fda-to-offer-a-1-million-anti-aging-treatment-in-colombia-38756dfb3ad1 If it were free, would anyone here sign up for this experiment? While I admire the pioneering spirit of someone who would, given the lack of evidence that longer telomeres is associated with slower human aging [1] and the risk that it may increase cancer rates, I would give it a pass. --Dean ----------------- [1] Aging Cell. 2019 Dec;18(6):e13017. doi: 10.1111/acel.13017. Epub 2019 Aug 24. Telomere length and aging-related outcomes in humans: A Mendelian randomization study in 261,000 older participants. Kuo CL(1), Pilling LC(2), Kuchel GA(3), Ferrucci L(4), Melzer D(2)(3). Author information: (1)Department of Community Medicine and Health Care, Connecticut Convergence Institute for Translation in Regenerative Engineering, Institute for Systems Genomics, University of Connecticut Health, Farmington, CT, USA. (2)Epidemiology and Public Health Group, University of Exeter Medical School, RILD Level 3, Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital, Exeter, UK. (3)Center on Aging, School of Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT, USA. (4)National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD, USA. Inherited genetic variation influencing leukocyte telomere length provides a natural experiment for testing associations with health outcomes, more robust to confounding and reverse causation than observational studies. We tested associations between genetically determined telomere length and aging-related health outcomes in a large European ancestry older cohort. Data were from n = 379,758 UK Biobank participants aged 40-70, followed up for mean of 7.5 years (n = 261,837 participants aged 60 and older by end of follow-up). Thirteen variants strongly associated with longer telomere length in peripheral white blood cells were analyzed using Mendelian randomization methods with Egger plots to assess pleiotropy. Variants in TERC, TERT, NAF1, OBFC1, and RTEL1 were included, and estimates were per 250 base pairs increase in telomere length, approximately equivalent to the average change over a decade in the general white population. We highlighted associations with false discovery rate-adjusted p-values smaller than .05. Genetically determined longer telomere length was associated with lowered risk of coronary heart disease (CHD; OR = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92-0.98) but raised risk of cancer (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.06-1.16). Little evidence for associations were found with parental lifespan, centenarian status of parents, cognitive function, grip strength, sarcopenia, or falls. The results for those aged 60 and older were similar in younger or all participants. Genetically determined telomere length was associated with increased risk of cancer and reduced risk of CHD but little change in other age-related health outcomes. Telomere lengthening may offer little gain in later-life health status and face increasing cancer risks. © 2019 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. DOI: 10.1111/acel.13017 PMCID: PMC6826144 PMID: 31444995
  27. A corroborating report at MedicalXpress: Eating only during a 10-hour window improved health for those with metabolic syndrome https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-12-clinical-hour-window-stave-diabetes.html
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