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Greg Scott

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Everything posted by Greg Scott

  1. [Admin Note: This thread was started (and has been chugging along for months) in the Chit Chat forum, before the "General Health and Longevity Forum" was created. I'm moving it because this is where it belongs. -Dean] My diet is primarily fruit, as I am not much attracted to other foods. There are many warnings on the Internet about a fruit-only regimen, for example one site listed these potential results: Impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and diabetes Elevated triglycerides Abdominal obesity Leptin resistance Inflammation and oxidative stress Endothelial dysfunction Microvascular disease Hyperuricemia Kidney damage Fatty liver disease High blood pressure Metabolic syndrome I've seen warnings about damage to the pancreas and pancreatic cancer. The element missing from all this free advice on the Internet is the role of quantity of fruit. I would guess that some problems stem from excessive consumption. For example, overeating fruit might push the pancreas too hard. Aside from trying to get B12, I add these foods out of concern that restriction to apples, grapes, bananas, and strawberries may lead to health problems: - flaxseed meal - broccoli - almonds - brazil nuts I would like to dispense with these foods, or at least cut down on frequency of consumption. Probably without the nuts there would be too little protein, but I wonder if that would be a health hazard aside from reduction in muscle mass. I would like to hear comments about the hazards of a fruitarian on CR, not about the hazards to those people who eat large quantities of fruit every day. My guess is that 2000kcal per day would be a "large" quantity for a man closer to 100 than to 200 pounds.
  2. Greg Scott

    Low methionine protein supplements?

    Yes, I wonder if hormesis/xenohormesis is a form of Mithridatism.
  3. Thanks Brian for the interesting comments. Wikipedia article on Political_spectrum: "...the contemporary American right is often considered communitarian (or populist) on sociocultural issues and individualist (or libertarian) on economic issues." I don't know how "scientific" such descriptions are, but they can certainly be entertaining. Similarly for the proliferation of chatter about "Generations" such as "Gen X" versus "Millenials". Are these collections of humans mere constructs, or do they really exist? It's all good, clean fun and I enjoy reading about these constructs even while wondering if the groups are real or imaginary.
  4. Greg Scott

    Soylent?

    Sounds like an askhole.
  5. Greg Scott

    Formatting problems in editing posts

    I compose a post in an external editor (not a component of the browser), then submit it to the forum software. After selecting "Preview Post", I often get a surprise at how it looks. In checking the composition area of the forum webpage, I see that the forum software has inserted markup that was not in my editor. This happens routinely with LIST tags and QUOTE tags. Is there any way to prevent the composition software from guessing what I intend and inserting its own markup?
  6. Greg Scott

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    A variation on the Tibetan Buddhist Sand mandala. The sand fights back...
  7. Unless your roommate is a psychopath. Ahem. Well said Sthira. If you're feeling lonesome, read The Stranger Beside Me by Ann Rule.
  8. Greg Scott

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    Agreed. Now that's good stuff Sthira. You've got talent, sonny.
  9. Greg Scott

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    Dean, This sounds like a contrast between an ordinary person and a genius. No contempt is intended in my use of the term "ordinary person". It also brings to mind this quotation: "Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people." It could be that the inspiration for this quotation Is Henry Buckle: Background is on p.32, the gist of the quotation is on p.33: Haud Immemor (Not Unmindful) by Charles Stewart. Here is the quotation for the click-averse: "Buckle said, in his dogmatic way: "Men and women range themselves into three classes or orders of intelligence ; you can tell the lowest class by their habit of always talking about persons ; the next by the fact that their habit is always to converse about things; the highest, by their preference for the discussion of ideas" The epigram, for an epigram, is, I think, unusually true; but the modifications it requires for practical life are too obvious to dwell on. The fact, of course, is that any of one's friends who was incapable of a little intermingling of these condiments would soon be consigned to the home for dull dogs." For more on Buckle: Wikipedia: Henry Buckle. Here is another excerpt you might like from "Haud Immemor" (p.158): " The best years of life are after fifty or sixty, when you know what the world really is and what it has to offer. One knows more, and can do more for others; has more experience, and is free from illusions about wealth or rank or love ; or even about religion, for one begins to see what is really valuable in it, and what is half physical and half emotional."
  10. Greg Scott

    B-vitamins + DHA = Less Cognitive Decline

    Dean, Thanks for this excellent post. You have produced a number of these educational posts with great screenshots. Can you tag those posts so we can get a listing of all your meta-forum posts? They really deserve to be spotlighted with some forum heading, like FAQ or "Tips for getting the most out of this website".
  11. Greg Scott

    CR Veteran(s?) Share Their Perspective

    Sthira, Don't be hard on yourself. I'd bet Dean meant it like "saucy" or "cheeky", something like this ad hoc "definition": taking things less seriously than the stuffed shirts do, in a way that is regarded as entertaining or amusing; In other words, nobody felt disrespected, and you are more amusing than offensive. No worries. That is interesting. I too don't expect to live longer than my genetic program dictates. All I am doing is avoiding an undue shortening of my potential by abusing my body through overeating or other harmful treatment.
  12. Greg Scott

    CR Veteran(s?) Share Their Perspective

    Huh? At least it appeared you were going to modify your diet in several significant ways as a result of some of these discussions. The hazards of a fruitarian diet thread seemed like it had some reasonable, actionable advice you at least said you were inclined to adopt. No? Yes Dean, I am a backslider. The alterations to my regimen didn't "take" or "stick". I got sick of nuts, for one thing. So the only behavior change I am aware of is the use of CRON-O-METER and my taking many of the vegan supplements on "the Dean's list". I was already drinking coffee, so all the research on the benefits of coffee consumption don't matter to me. Anyway, I'll probably find out that the benefits don't accrue to someone drinking my coffee, or my coffee prepared the way I do it. Ah - the naturalistic fallacy. You do know it's natural for humans to eat meat,... This raises the question of what is "natural". Among humans, is eating meat more natural than smoking tobacco? I read that 92% of Chinese men smoke, so it would appear to be as natural as eating meat in America. Or is there more to it than prevalence? I could never tolerate alcohol, and eating meat never appealed to me. Veganism is effortless and seems nearly instinctive. Is that quirk "unnatural"? I'm missing your point here. What "experiments" do you mean? I'm all for sanitation that promotes health and longevity, quarantine of the infected. Is that what you mean by experiments that offset the "natural" tendency to die young?
  13. Greg Scott

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    My feeling exactly (that such arguments are "fairly weak and not especially convincing". I don't believe there is any amount of ratiocination that could produce defensible "theorems" about purpose in life. It all boils down to preference. Saying that preferences are inherited, based on eons of selection (i.e. they have survival value) doesn't justify the preferences. They might be useful for propagating genes, but survival itself is pointless in a universe devoid of purpose (or at least a universe in which animal life has no purpose (in a philosophical, teleological sense) other than proliferation or continuance of genetic factors). I find most instances of "life purpose" to be *very* arbitrary, rather than merely *somewhat* arbitrary. But we all need to pass our time somehow, so I applaud anyone who latches on to some "purpose" that provides self-justification or gratification and doesn't hurt anyone else. I like that way of putting it, and concur. However pointless and arbitrary the adoption of his principle might appear, it is certainly admirable. My "take" is probably clear from the foregoing remarks, but I'll elaborate anyhow. I have an esthetic approach to this issue. [it seems the quaint spelling aesthetic might still be predominant, but I'm all for spelling reform] There are behaviors that appear ugly, including selfish or hurtful attitudes and actions. They appear so to me, no matter what anyone says. However, I am not a unique machine, so I expect many other humans to think just as I do. You made a comment earlier about a framework being "convincing or ennobling", and that nails it. The "convincing" part covers the need we have for rational notions, and the "ennobling" part covers what I call the esthetic approach. Attitudes and behaviors that we would call noble attract us. Their opposites (ignoble, selfish, heinous,... whatever expressions of distaste or disapprobation we use) are repellant, ugly, offensive to our delicate esthetic sensibilities. The ugly reality is that there are people who don't share our esthetic values. That compels us to do a cost/benefit analysis of confrontation with them. In some cases we defend our arbitrary values by attempting to obliterate the enemy. The outcome doesn't matter to anyone but us, here and now. Nothing matters really. But we do have our predispositions and preferences, and each of us can have a grand time, for it seems to me we live on an interesting little planet.
  14. Greg Scott

    Formatting problems in editing posts

    Dean, It might be premature to report after making only one long post, since that one post did not have much markup in it (such as LIST items). But I think your suggestion has merit. I did not see a proliferation of markup generated by the forum software. So it appears that the beast has been tamed.
  15. Greg Scott

    Marking all posts read

    Thank you Dean. As always, your response was helpful.
  16. Greg Scott

    Marking all posts read

    The function "View New Content" is most useful. After a hiatus, there might be a great many posts listed. Is there a way to select and mark posts that are not of interest as read without actually selecting them? Email programs allow you to select multiple messages without reading them, then trash the group. Is there a similar function for removing posts from the "View New Content" display?
  17. Greg Scott

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    Another arbitrary assertion ("Happiness is the purpose of life.") I see nothing wrong with setting goals or pursuits. One has to pass the time somehow. Yet the feverish "pursuit of happiness" seems to cause more misery to the pursuers than if they would just relax and enjoy life.
  18. Greg Scott

    CR Veteran(s?) Share Their Perspective

    Dean, My impression of the website and forums could merely reflect my obtuseness. There might be great value here that I have overlooked. I keep tabs on the forums mostly because I like the way you think and write. I have not found much in the way of actionable advice or guidelines here. I don't have the capacity to digest voluminous and intricate research reports and derive practical guidelines. Allow me to make a facetious comment pertaining to the way scientific studies might be used to alter one's behavior: I might train my body to sleep on the right side. After 40 years, I find out that the benefits are only derived from sleeping on the left side. Of course there are some conclusions from research so convincing that most of us have altered our behavior, but in general I don't do anything that doesn't come naturally to me. At this point I will note exceptions to my contention that there is little actionable information: the excellent advice I received on the forums to use CRON-O-METER software, and your list of vegan supplements. This has been the biggest change in my practice. Otherwise, I'm just plodding along doing what I've been doing for over 40 years. I haven't bothered with doctors or blood tests, so I accept that I might be doomed and just don't know it. I accept that risk. It helps that I'm not concerned about longevity. I follow a CR regimen because it makes me feel good and satisfies a strong ascetic tendency that seems inbuilt (as does a vegan compulsion). Of course, many would say I'm not either, if you look at my raw calorie intake and ignore my net energy balance and weight/BMI. Dean, you follow a high calorie/high exercise program, and I follow a low calorie/low exercise program. So there would seem to be few practices of yours I would adopt. Yet I have paid attention to your vegan supplementation recommendations, and I simply find it interesting to follow what you are doing. What I do *appears* to work for me, but nobody should want to emulate my practice. The socializing part might account for why I continue to respond to forum posts. That's as close to socializing as I get. If alone-ness (not loneliness) were bad for longevity, I'd really be a goner. But I agree with Sthira, that we hermits sometimes seem to have surprising longevity. I am curious whether I'll roll sixes or snake eyes. Time will tell. I wonder if such busy people can derive anything useful from forum discussions. Maybe it is entertaining discussion even if not actionable. They must be absorbing info that I am too obtuse to see the use of. The info is interesting, but not useful to me. I have no reservations about sharing details of my practice, but why should anyone want to know what I do? Like I said, my regimen is based on my intuitions and inbuilt quirks. They show admirable restraint, not adding useless quips and opinions to posts by diligent and better-informed contributors. Think of them as spectators with the good manners not to blurt out worthless reactions. Or think of them as your bashful fans. I have not "heard it all before" when it comes to the studies discussed in the forums. I skim the research summaries out of interest, but the results don't translate into behavior change. I follow a CR regimen because it makes me feel best. I doubt that my practice will translate into impressive longevity. Probably I've been sleeping on the wrong side most of my life. You have contributed so much that interests me, that I hope this post is of interest to you.
  19. Greg Scott

    The Ultimate Purpose of Life

    OK. If there is no purpose, I see little meaning in "the best thing we can do". This sounds totally arbitrary, a mere personal preference.
  20. Greg Scott

    JOKES

    I've heard that hydrogen peroxide is deadlier than dihydrogen monoxide.
  21. Greg Scott

    Helping People via Kiva.org Microloans

    Dean, This was a great post! Thank you for bringing Kiva.org to our attention. I had been wondering about how to extend microcredit, and kiva.org appears to be a great way to accomplish that. I read up about the organization at Wikipedia: Kiva.org and at reddit: Kiva.org. Despite my considerable reluctance in registering accounts online (fearing well-meaning organizations being hacked), I created an account. For others reading this, rest assured the website is easy to use and permits payments via PayPal. It was all very painless, including "choosing a borrower" (to use kiva.org's phrase). There were many appealing borrowers. For starters, I've been looking for coffee farmers in South America. I favor older folks, since there is a log of ageism in the world, making it hard for elders to catch a break. Thank you! I used your gift code and added my own portion for a "Total Loans, Gifts, and Donations $57.50". There was an anonymous donor who matched my contribution, which sweetens the deal. For others, note that every $25 to a borrower incurs a $3.75 contribution to kiva.org, including the $25 from Dean's gift card. However, the $7.50 that goes to kiva.org from the $57.50 is not outrageous. Yes Dean, I am glad to join Kiva.org and help out people like Gregorio. Thanks again for the gift card and the introduction to a fine microfinance organization.
  22. Greg Scott

    The View Out of My Window Here

    Dean, I only tried from Linux Chrome browser. My Windows 7 PC is stored until tax preparation time. Thanks for the photo. Your driveway is enormous!
  23. Greg Scott

    The View Out of My Window Here

    Brian, I'm in TX and could not view the image either. It looked like a featureless smoggy sky.
  24. Greg Scott

    Coffee Once Again Shown to be Good For You

    I'm wondering if the noxiousness of phenols is helpful according to the idea of hormesis...
  25. Greg Scott

    Coffee Once Again Shown to be Good For You

    Dean, Thanks for pointing that out. I had assumed a cup was a cup was a cup ... Thanks for that info. Also good to know. This short post was well worth reading. This might not be the right place to parade my ignorance around, but Google searches didn't enlighten me, so here goes. Catechins are antioxidants (a good thing), but they are also phenols. Phenols don't sound that good for health. So how do we laymen reconcile these? Some background to my question: Wiktionary: phenol: 1. A caustic, poisonous, white crystalline compound, C6H5OH, derived from benzene and used in resins, plastics, and pharmaceuticals and in dilute form as a disinfectant and antiseptic; once called carbolic acid. 2. Any of a class of aromatic organic compounds having at least one hydroxyl group attached directly to the benzene ring. Synonyms: (caustic compound derived from benzene): carbolic acid Wikipedia: Catechin: Catechin is a flavan-3-ol, a type of natural phenol and antioxidant. It is a plant secondary metabolite. It belongs to the group of flavan-3-ols (or simply flavanols), part of the chemical family of flavonoids. Interesting trivia: ... catechin chemical family derives from catechu, which is the tannic juice or boiled extract of Mimosa catechu (Acacia catechu L.f) catechu: Probably a corruption of the Malay kachu. A gummy extract of any of several species of Acacieae, produced by boiling the wood of the tree in water and evaporating the resulting liquid.
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