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Mechanism

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  1. Agenda: https://www.leafscience.org/2019-program/ Background: https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/04/the-nyc-2019-ending-age-related-disease-conference-is-coming-up-in-july/
  2. Great story Gordo. Moreover how generous of you not only to be willing to give them away but also offer them at your own trouble, right here on the CR community forum. Alas I wish but don’t have the personal resources to followup on your kindness, but maybe, one day, if they are still around. Hopefully someone else can benefit from your offering!
  3. Mechanism

    basic blood tests

    I agree with Michael it’s place has yet to be determined ( based on preliminary data some MD’s are declaring it as an independent risk factor but the actual data is more mixed):https://www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-8587(17)30063-3/Fulltext There is the hope that lowering it can help reduce risk, though that has failed for HDL, there are mechanistic reasons to hope better for Lp(a): https://www.endocrineweb.com/professional/endocrinology/lipoproteina-independent-risk-factor-cardiovascular-disease FYI the impact of nutrition on Lp(a) - which is strongly influenced by genetics - is mixed and modest at best ( conflicting and meager results), hence pharmaceutical aspirations, but whether these will work for the primary endpoints remains to be seen. Michael, pointing McCoy in the right direction for labs is very helpful, but beyond setting a baseline for assessing the impact of interventions and for surveillance, would you agree that setting target values or ranges for those lab be helpful as well? I ask because I have been following my own biomarkers for some time now and am interested for comparative purposes what targets you set for yourself for IGF-1 to IGF-3-bp values/ratio , free T3, free testosterone and other CR biomarkers? If it is not too personal ( and understanding that everyone is different), could you share with us your current CR biomarkers value-range goals? For CRP-hs and HgBA1certainly “the lower the better”, but the ideal values for the other CR biomarkers are far from trivial ( hence my question).
  4. Mechanism

    basic blood tests

    Nice additions Sibiriak. I get the extended panel myself. McCoy, for the iodine assessment just keep in mind serum levels are pretty worthless, as are urinary spot tests - you would need to get a 24-hour urine test or if this is not possible the next best thing urinary iodine to creatinine ratio: https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/122714-workup#c2
  5. The clock is ticking, if you haven’t RSVP’d the free Boston conference is coming up this Monday!
  6. Mechanism

    basic blood tests

    Hi McCoy, depends on your goals but at a minimum I I would add hs-CRP and free T3, and fasting insulin if you are interested in biomarkers of inflammation, CR, and metabolic syndrome/insulin respectively. For more inspiration, see the CR society recs here: http://www.crsociety.org/resources/tests_and_biomarkers And this thread among others ( search for “biomarkers”): https://www.crsociety.org/topic/11215-latest-bloodwork/ There are a lot more interesting labs ( eg, IL-6, adiponectin, or getting IGF bonding protein 3 for a little more perspective on the bioavailability of your IGF-1, etc) depending on your price and goals but cheaper labs like fasting glucose and the ones above can go a long way. If you are concerned about glucose tolerance, an oral glucose tolerance test can be helpful. I necessarily bother with folate ( water soluble and moreover rarely a concern for high plant diets), but adding homocysteine ( influenced by folate, B12, etc. functionally speaking + genetics) might be something to consider if it did’t cost too much, if you are very concerned about cardiac markers having an “NMR” lipid panel that can give particle numbers and size or other lipid testing ( like Lp(a) and apolipoproten B for example) can be helpful. I would consider running by your doc and/or nutritionist who knows your personal and family medical history for anything that might be unique to you. For example, you are mostly vegan and getting a baseline B12 level and methylmalonic acid ( MMA) can be helpful in that setting. This post is not intended to be comprehensive but more a few hopefully helpful considerations as you try to strike a balance between comprehensiveness towards your goals and expense. Good luck!
  7. Mechanism

    Cronometer results for the FMD

    Indeed, "well done" ( for fun, click on the speaker icon to hear it)
  8. Mechanism

    Cronometer results for the FMD

    Nice work McCoy!
  9. An oldie but goodie with Aubrey de Gray. While he has had better and more technical interviews introducing the SENS methodology, I found his take on the extent of LE expected with CR while not entirely novel, interesting, and worth sharing: Besides his usual commentary that as we move from lower organisms to higher and longer-lived organisms the benefit of CR empirically has been shown to decline, as we may expect from evolutionary arguments pertaining to the duration of famines as a proportion of an organism's lifespan and reproduction, he emphasized a couple of memorable statistics -( I know this is not new to old-timer CR's, but interesting to hear directly from Aubrey ) --: 1) The lack of survival benefit in NIA monkey trial versus 5% life extension in @ U Wisc , arguing that the benefit is likely somewhere in between because the controls had unusually good diets versus unhealthy SAD respectively for the two trials. The argument is not new, but a reminder of about what percent life extension was suggested in the U Wisc group. Personally I find the health improvements in both trials most compelling ( quality of life improvement as opposed to profound and dramatic life extension). 2) Natural caloric restriction example - Okinawa Japan. Though often cited "triple" rate of centenarians, he points out that on average this translates to only about 2 year increased survival. This appears to be on the generous side in some respects given the table here: http://okicent.org/( life expectancy 81.2 in Okinawa vs 79.9 in the rest of Japan which is healthy on average but was not calorically restricted). Of course if comparing to a less healthy society the benefit looks better, but geroscientists would appropriately see these as unfair controls if we are discussing true CR. Regarding the centenarians we frequently discuss here, it looked to be around 50/100,000 or about half a percent: http://okicent.org/cent.html ... also, for gentlemen in the crowd, 90% of them were women. The US statistics have come up since then at about 2.2/10,000 as of around 2015: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/04/21/worlds-centenarian-population-projected-to-grow-eightfold-by-2050/ In the U.S., 80% are women: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-centenarians/ranks-of-u-s-centenarians-growing-rapidly-report-idUSKCN0UZ2IR I seem to remember Peter Attia recently quoting around 0.4% of the population, but this sounds too generous and I suspect it its a conditional probability taking out infant mortality / younger deaths or another sort of contingent or conditional probability ....whilst sadly a new generation of Okinawans with Westernized diet on a trajectory for far below rather than well above average outcomes. Following the interview, Geoffrey Woo tries to make the case that captivity could have limited the lifespan in the CR group; AdG countered previously that you would need to have a compelling reason to expect the experimental group to be affected more by this than the controls. Some of these were discussed around 24:10 in part 1 and continue to part 2. Also interesting, sometimes i forget that our very own Michael Rae here is a celebrity of sorts: Co-authored Ending Aging with Aubrey, etc. https://www.amazon.com/Books-Michael-Rae/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=n%3A283155%2Cp_27%3AMichael%20Rae ( consider donating to SENS ( http://www.sens.org/donate), crsociety, etc.) I was a little surprised to hear the reference in part II @ 23:15 [ in reference to interviewing Michael Rae he states ] "We'll have him on soon" -- alas I was disappointed on searching following this 2016 interview I could not find the follow-up interview. Michael, any prospects for recent interviews with you @ HVMN / "Thinking Podcast or on other podcasts or lectures? #### Part I Part II PS - may throw you off: the podcast changed names from HVMN to the Thinking Podcast between parts. HVMN is still the company name.
  10. Mechanism

    Al's CR updates

    That is fascinating Al- I always look forward to your weekly updates! do you pick a different google search every week, or do you have a Boolean such algorithm that is the same every week and updates? I am curious how you decide what to search each week -Mechanism
  11. Nice find McCoy & Sibiriak! Some of this work is further summarized in the lay press here: https://m.phys.org/news/2009-05-glucose-glycerol-conversion-long-lived-yeast.html This is not new news but an important area of longevity nutrient pathway research, namely to quote a more recent 2016 publication, Nitrogen and carbon source balance determines longevity, independently of fermentative or respiratory metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: “data herewith highlight the balance of nitrogen and carbon sources as major longevity regulators, in parallel to what has been described for the Protein: Carbohydrate ratio in higher eukaryotic models, further establishing yeast as an up to date aging model organism.” Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5029608/pdf/oncotarget-07-23033.pdf If their reference sounds familiar, they are referring to the nutritional geometry work and “Okinawa ratio” discussed here previously: https://watermark.silverchair.com/afw069.pdf?token=AQECAHi208BE49Ooan9kkhW_Ercy7Dm3ZL_9Cf3qfKAc485ysgAAAaYwggGiBgkqhkiG9w0BBwagggGTMIIBjwIBADCCAYgGCSqGSIb3DQEHATAeBglghkgBZQMEAS4wEQQMILfP4DMQ3s2ZZKV8AgEQgIIBWb8e7omSa80p1A2iax-FyrM65mPJYqVA07P_ezPNO9EFfw1UTB_5ZsCBMbVtdkMpqWESmI9unktmkdNZnvzWSAGehVgUSuZ3AO0d2ZyQugi3_CzIFL1MC_LNDHw8fu5yhkLw4ucVEkmVUJzxEKohTHqlg6y0A77tjgBUjMmdm8Xcq2hgITBL8REswvNZ_iOeE8bya7frxGzrXWuqInuliK_q9EQB8KX3cH_3Pn_EHNq2UZdp1FQ-Y1ex1jb1nIzY5xkSKVnFpsv0XOt4ZdE9cfEAhwrCVbggaE6FDa32fCzWATrIiUiiQWQQ36a3HjT6tyeuIDXSInzC_ZecC514E69K2nHYzipeMAxa-c7tOFek5Znn9aXPBL6L3XI02-irdYmNSYHc_06QajlpPD2ZkKgOgMBiXQxOxhS6cVZ-lef5_RaoQl2QIv_FXkUWtQAZXjTYcZlWpjctDw In addition to longevity matters, Valter Longo has investigated glycerol as an isocaloric method of sustaining metabolic demands during chemotherapy while maintaining lower blood glucose: “Although the mice on the glycerol diet ate slightly more than those on the control diet, they showed an 18% reduction in blood glucose level by day 6” From his patent: https://patents.justia.com/patent/20150133370
  12. I agree Saul. Denial is a powerful defense mechanism, even for the most rational. I am jealous: sorry I can't join you in Kriplau - have a great time & happy ( soon to be) 79th Birthday!
  13. Mechanism

    Al's CR updates

    Thank you Al as always for all the effort you put into your abstract compilations. This classic conference monograph was originally published in 1991 -- what brought it to your attention to cite now?
  14. Thanks for the info McCoy - I was aware of his work ( https://www.weizmann.ac.il/pages/home/algorithm-diet) but not the lay public book based on it. Of course while in the lab they can use neural nets to mine potentially predictive associations across population, we in contrast can perform N=1 experiments to guage our own idiosyncratic responses, something I have been doing for several years. I agree Todd we are all different, and with you McCoy there are still useful rules of thumb. At this point before we all have our own personal neural-net analyzing our data, ideally we start with general principles such as minimizing processed, high glycemic and higher risk foods, maximize health practices ( including exercise and good sleep hygeine), and then test our personal responses ( by higher quality biomarkers, for example, as you suggested Todd) to evaluate how we may deviate at individual level, and for increased predictive granularity.
  15. Thanks McCoy. The guidance for ages 65-70+ also occurred to me but I do not attribute this to the sample diet since he specified it for a 31-50 yo female. I agree the dairy portions are not large by any standards, but not insignificant biologically with a material incremental impact on IGF-1 given the relative proportions of amino acids.... under geriatric age he usually describes the diet as vegan+fish which de-emphasizes cheese for this cohort. Having said that he did not explicitly forbid it in the younger populations so it is still within reason. Nevertheless given the spirit of his recommendations, I see the inclusion of multiple dairy portions in the first week sample as potential dietician artistic license with his approach, and the compliance factor I suggested above. I have a different theory regarding 60 vs 80 grams. The Italian version was published before the US version- I would not be surprised if he or someone caught it as too high or too many weekly grams of protein and corrected for the US printing / Kindle which is more recent. Theories abound, and these are mere speculations on my part.
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