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TomBAvoider

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  1. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    You have to take this with a grain of salt. Looking at the study, the optimal parameters for all-cause mortality are as follows: 1) Frequency of running: 1-2 times a week 2) Speed 7.1-7.5 mph 3) Distance per week: 9-12 miles 4)Total time per week: >150 min <176 min There really is no way to hit all of these 4 parameters at the same time. Take 151 min per week (lowermost optimal value) - then run at speed of 7.1 mph (lowermost optimal value) that translates into 17.8 miles a week - and the optimum per week is no more than 12 miles a week. So even running the lowest optimum time at the lowest optimum speed still takes you to MORE than the optimal number of miles a week. The numbers are impossible to work out. You are going to fall sub-optimal somewhere along the line. Also, the numbers are very close across the quintiles, so I wouldn't sweat it necessarily.
  2. TomBAvoider

    Rapa is well tolerated

    This is of course in a therapeutic setting, but in principle it shows that humans can tolerate rapa and even benefit from it - so it's 'proof of concept' to some degree: https://prostatecancernewstoday.com/2020/02/17/erapa-leads-to-boost-in-immune-cells-in-low-grade-prostate-cancer-patients-phase-1b-data-suggest/ Daily treatment with a low dose of eRapa, Emtora Biosciences' new formulation of the therapeutic agent rapamycin, was safe and well tolerated, and led to immune system cell boosting in patients with low-grade prostate cancer, according to data from a Phase 1b clinical trial.
  3. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    not reach 50 years old You need to get your lipid profile sorted. LDL of 118 is a bit high, especially combined with the definitely low HDL of 34. Exercise elevates HDL, so focus on that. Your goal should be cardio-respiratory fitness, as that is associated with better health and survival. One thing you can definitely watch is your RHR - with enough exercise, your RHR (Resting Heart Rate) should go down, so that's a good measure of how well you're doing - shoot for 50's, not higher than 60. Low RHR is associated with better survival. Back in the day I used to have fairly highish RHR of 68-70, and through exercise lowered it to my current 52. As far as CR, don't stress too much. Concentrate on not overeating and a healthy diet. With time, if you are disciplined, and your diet supplies all your micronutrient needs, you'll find that your calorie intake naturally goes down - if you maintain a BMI of 19 or so, you should be fine.
  4. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    Thanks Khurram! Re: Amazon reviews - you linked to the X-Large where you find 14 OK reviews (on average), but if you click on the M-medium size, you now see 67 reviews and the average is bad. Same mask, but I'd probably spring for the M rather than X-Large, and that gives me poor reviews, YMMV. Anyhow, I'll go ahead and order the M size from Amazon, and hope for the best. Thank you again!
  5. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    I don't care about aesthetics or how it looks - I'm a fairly thick skinned individual and figure if others don't like it they can go pound sand :) - as it is, my head, face, neck are pretty much fully covered to the point where it looks like a beekeeper headpiece - just to avoid excess UV exposure, and some people do a double take, but mostly nobody cares. Indeed, trying to avoid high traffic areas is common sense, but I live in LA (West Hollywood) - and sadly, this means high traffic is pretty much everywhere. Now, of course, right next to a freeway or major street is going to be worse, but nowhere is it "good". I run on a track in a park that's about a block away from a very major street (Santa Monica Blvd.), so it's not ideal by any means and I could really use a mask. Wrt. the breathing, that's a concern, though not a catastrophy - I do daily PowerBreathing exercises: https://www.amazon.com/POWERbreathe-Heavy-Reistance-Black-LSI-Plus-3B/dp/B001O67BYM/ So I'm not put off by a bit of breathing resistance - there are even special masks some athletes use for exactly this purpose, to obstruct breathing and exercise those muscles while running... not sure how beneficial that is exactly, but it shows it can be done. What is worse, is that I unfortunately have mucous problems on about 75% of my runs - my nose starts flowing around the 8th lap (like clockwork - not 7th and not 9th - on the days it does); this is not a big deal as I always carry two tissues for just this purpose. But with the mask, I can see this becoming a major problem. Anyhow, I'll have to think about this. I'm very tempted. What's stopping me from immediately ordering one on Amazon is the very large number of really negative reviews. I'll still probably get it. Thanks, Khurram!
  6. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    Yes, I am *very* concerned about air pollution. Including indoor air quality. Ever since we started having epic wildfires here in CA, I bought an indoor air purifier a couple of years ago, one that was tested and has the highest recommendation from wirecutter: https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-air-purifier/ I also briefly looked into masks - obviously, I jog outside, so this is a big concern - but I couldn't find any reputable testing. The Respro you mention - does it have any independent testing a la wirecutter behind it? I looked at Amazon, and the Respro masks there either have very few reviews (like 2), or the reviews are not very good. I'd love to get a mask, but I'm just not sure where we stand on this - do these work to any appreciable degree and is there any research into particular brands? TIA!
  7. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    Speaking of bikes - I sometimes ride along the beach on the bike path here in SoCal, Santa Monica to Hermosa Beach, Manhattan Beach etc., about a 45 minute, or 1 hour ride one way, so 1.5 - 2 hours total. However, I solve the position drawback to some degree, because I don't sit - instead, I stand, and my bike doesn't have the ram-horn-handle racing bike configuration, instead it's it's more of a cruiser bike with elevated handles. I can tell you that you get a *much* more vigorous workout if you stand all the time while pedalling.
  8. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    Thank you so much, Todd, for the report from the front lines :)... I am trying to get my head around what the best protocol is going forward, knowing at the same time, that whatever I develop today will have to change as my body changes. I will take your remarks under advisement - doing sets without going to failure. I just don't want to do less than I am still capable of, because I know the day will come when I will not have a choice anymore.
  9. Interesting. Honestly, I usually distrust very much such courses, purporting to tell me what will and will not make me happy, successful with x, y and z etc. - I find more often than not, that these courses are geared to those who have done very little self-retrospection and generally are not applicable to me. Of course, it's possible this one is an exception - I might check it out sometime.
  10. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    Thanks Ron, I was aware of this research, and I think it has a great deal of validity. After all, it feels even intuitively wrong to posit that aging is a perfectly linear process. Instead, it seems highly likely that various systems age differently and indeed may have stepwise turning points and furthermore they influence each other, when a given hormone level falls in an aging process it in turn may affect something else and so forth as one would expect in a highly dynamic system. So indeed it may be the case that while I experienced a profile of effects of exercise up to a given age, it all changed purely because of biological processes and not as a result of anything that I may have done in altering my exercise regimen. I guess my concern is more global - what is the right balance of exercise at any given age point, what is a "normal" and even beneficial amount of soreness (as a manifestation of repair processes and hormesis), and at what point the hormesis is now excessive and tips into a net negative. We're all well aware of the common understanding that recovery from exercise is slower the older you get - and as Ron points out, it is often non-linear - but I suppose there must be an optimal mix of intensity of exercise vs sufficient recovery for any point of your aging timeline. I imagine that at this point there's only a heuristic approach of trial and error ("oops, I overdid it, I guess at my age I must pull back a bit on this or that" etc.). Saul, yes, it was a home version of the eliptical - and as I've stated before, I'm *very* hard on my equipment and none of the machines I've purchased have lasted very long (or maybe I just had bad luck). What you describe is certainly very useful when it comes to respiratory fitness, which without doubt is a very key component of exercise and health. However, I still think that there is some (slight? entirely speculative?) danger that if you are strapped into a machine that does not reflect natural activities of daily living as our evolution has shaped us for, then you might be developing some kind of muscle-tendon-nerve imbalances that may be suboptimal from a holistic perspective. To give an exaggerated example, imagine that you have someone train extensively one set of muscles while entirely neglecting the "core" or other supporting muscles - it seems that the strong muscles might then upon exertion damage or stress muscles that are not prepared. Whereas if you are training for the specific function, you are developing ALL the muscle, tendon, neuron systems to allow for optimal use of that function (running, lifting, dragging etc.). As an example, running apparently does strengthen the leg bones (but *not* upper body), and biking or elliptical exercise does not even as it develops the same major muscles. So now you're faced with the task of strengthening the bones with a separate set of exercises in addition to your elliptical. Meawhile, if you run, you get both for the price of one - seems the efficiency might be greater. Even though I run, I still worry about insufficient bone signalling (through vibration) becaus of my running technique (as I described in a previous post), and so in order to cover that, I use my WBV machine. Of course you are right that there may be excellent reasons for the use of exercise machines - say, if you have bad knees - and as I mentioned previously this is a great application of exercise machines in a therapeutic context. It is also possible that as one ages one may need to resort to machines more. Anyway, Saul, you must be doing something right if you can manage to have excellent cardiorespiratory fitness at your age - so carry on, what works, works! And whenever I interact with you, Saul, I try not to fail to mention someone like Henri Cartan: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Cartan French Mathematician lived until 104 - was his diet CR? Did he use an elliptical? You still have a ways to go, Saul, to beat your fellow mathematicians :) :) :)
  11. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    I actually used to own an elliptical machine and worked out on it for months, but ultimately, I felt it was not enough. I guess I've been converted to the view that machines, while they have their place (particularly in therapy), have some real limitations. I am a big believer in functional exercise - i.e. doing exercise that helps with tasks of daily living. Running is an actual function of living the way being on an elliptical is not. There are many muscles and tendons in the feet and lower legs that are stressed/exercised the way they are not when using a machine. There are more subtle aspects too - balance, the fact that you need to pay attention to the environment and react to it, provides the kind of exercise conditioning with neurological aspects that are not duplicated in any machine. It's roughly the same idea as free weights - while I think one can use weight machines in a selective and targeted manner, free weights are much closer to functional exercise where you use many more smaller stabilizing muscles and tendons and neurological feedback to provide more holistic overall benefits. YMMV.
  12. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    It's interesting, Dean mentioned shoes - minimalist shoes impact running technique, is what I think you mean(?). Research is all over the place. The consensus seems - at least today - to be that neither shoes nor running technique matter as far as injuries. But I feel - purely subjective - that Dean is right, because I deliberately adopted a certain technique while running - I keep up a good tempo, but I try NOT to lift my legs too high and "pound", but rather keep my feet close to the ground and "glide" utilizing my knees a lot - knees as far as *muscle* goes, not *bone* - I use my knee muscles for the glide to maintain "spring" in my step, it's very gentle when it hits the ground, it's not a hard bounce that I would feel in my bones - it's more like "loping" than running. I feel - subjectively - that when the stress is more on the muscles and tendons and less on the bone itself, your knee joint is more protected. Now, bone vibration is minimized by that technique, so to compensate I have the WBV machine (still with bent knees and squats though!). Bottom line, I feel technique might be important for protecting the knees after all, contrary to a lot of recent consensus. YMMV.
  13. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    Thanks, Dean and mccoy - yes, I thought about statins, but I conducted an experiment of sorts when I fasted for 8 days - in preparation, and for 3 months afterwards, I went off statins, because they interefere with mitochondrial recovery, and so the benefits of fasting would be compromised. Despite quitting statins for 3+ months, I experienced no difference in exercise pain. But yes, there is extensive literature wrt. muscles, exercise and statins. Also, Dean you do a lot more(!) exercise than I do, as I have one full day of non-exercising, and run only 4 days a week (weight lifting 2 x week). I don't know about intensity, probably I do it a bit more intensely since I incorporate HIIT into my running (i.e. spells of absolute max effort) and weights to failure. I have no issues with my knees (so far), and since a couple of months I've incorporated squats on my vibration machine 5 times a week, so it's 350 squats per day x 5 days is 1750 squats a week. I am cautiously optimistic wrt. knees, as the literature seems to indicate that running/jogging is not really destructive to knees and might even be protective. Of course, you never know, and maybe with age my knees will collapse. Anyhow, so far at least the soreness is tolerable and it usually resolves as the day progresses and I'm walking - feet are usually sore after a period of sitting/lying. Dean, vegan diet might be part of why you don't experience these problems, but it's hard to gauge, because there isn't another Dean who is the control :)
  14. TomBAvoider

    Exercise Effects

    When I was young (teens), I noted how all the guys who were exercising were always injured and complaining, whereas I who did not exercise felt just fine and furthermore I didn't seem in worse shape and conditioning than the exercisers. However, due to the relentless pro-exercise "propaganda", I eventually started exercising, starting in my 20's. Those were usually pretty intermittent - a few months at a time, sometimes a couple of years. Both aerobic and weights. One thing I noted is that I had an exceptionally easy time putting on muscle mass, something that was remarked upon by others in the gym. Anyhow, one thing that I also did note was that all the so-called benefits of exercise in certain subjective and psychological realms never applied to me. I never felt "fantastic" or got "runner's high" - in fact, I noted zero - repeat, zero - health benefits that I could discern. All that changed when I hit my mid 50's. I for the first time felt benefits of aerobic exercise. Whereas before, I had a natural reserve of muscle and conditioning without exercise, I now needed exercise to keep at that level. Thus, exercise became something that I "required" - I never enjoyed it (at any time in my life), but I now saw the necessity. But in the last couple of years a different dynamic took over. I was never prone to injury, and it happened very rarely. But these days I seem to injure pretty easily. Whereas before I could lift weights to failure (necessary for muscle growth) with no injury, I now find with dismay that unless I work my way up in weights VERY slowly, I can sustain a muscle injury. Most recently, it has been my right bicep I injured when lifting to failure - and it's SLOW in recovery... it's been weeks and it's still sore. I have also absurdly pulled a muscle in my thigh when I started a HIIT running program. Just a few years ago, I was doing Tabatha runs with zero problems and gave up in boredom. Now I decided to add a HIIT component to my regular running and after a few weeks I suddenly pulled a leg muscle. Not when I just started, but after a few weeks! Horrendous and surprising. It took quite a while to recover. The other thing that is now a CONSTANT - my feet are sore. I ran for years (well over 10 years) with no problems. But the last couple of years things deteriorated. Not exactly plantar f. but something in the same neighborhood. It takes me a few minutes every morning when I get out of bed before my feet are fine - never used to be like this. I go for a run, and then a few hours later, my feet are sore if I sit down for awhile (watching a movie etc.). And it has nothing to do with shoes as far as I can tell - after all, until a couple of years ago, my feet were NEVER sore, no matter how long I ran. So the soreness started, but it used to be that when I had a day off from jogging, my feet would recover 100%. In the last few months, that's no longer the case. My feet are always sore - unless I quit completely (when I went on a vacation of 2 weeks, my feet completely stopped being sore). So now I'm in an absurd position. I jog regularly 4 times a week, and my feet are ALWAYS sore. They never recover completely before I run again. What does that mean? Now, whenever you exercise intensely there's always muscle recovery soreness, so that's expected - and I guess you benefit healthwise. But I am suspicious of being sore ALL the time and never *completely* pain free - is this not simply a state of micro-injuries never healing and thus perhaps it's a net NEGATIVE healthwise? I am now like those guys whom I watched as a young lad - those guys who were always exercising and always injured. Perhaps getting older means I must dial back on the intensity. But perhaps being sore and it taking a few minutes before all my muscles and tendons loosen up is just a new "normal", and one should just ignore it? Anyhow, I must say, getting older has some drawbacks - you (at least I) can no longer exercise without soreness.
  15. That table Dean posted pegs the mortality rate for the Wuhan virus at a relatively low 2.8% (compared to f.ex. the Nipah at 77.6%!). What I'm wondering is who is vulnerable - f.ex. is it an issue with the immune compromised, elderly and children etc. - but then again, sometimes it seems almost random as with the flu where recently there have been several cases of young women dying within a shockingly short time frame. This does make one wonder, since there is some controversy about whether CRONies are especially vulnerable to viral diseases. But if the fatality rate is lowish (and in fact the 2.8% number is confirmed) and it strikes mostly the immuno-suppressed, then I'm not sure if I'd make any special preparations for the "plague"... the return on such prepartions might be pretty low given the lowish overall risk. I have made no preparations, mostly due to inertia and lack of any sense of urgency. We've had a few cases here in the U.S., but I have not worked up any worry energy to become concerned. Of course if the virus mutates and the fatality rate soars, I might bestir myself to put on a mask, but otherwise I'm not sweating it (for now). YMMV.
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