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victoria1

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  1. I have been practicing CR for a while now, but lately I have been getting more and more into a intermittent fasting type of regimen as well. I know that both CR and IF has benefits but I wonder if the benefits will increase if combined? Any thoughts?
  2. victoria1

    Alcohol

    After reading around in this forum I got the impression that most people doing CR is against alcohol and never touch it. So I wonder, do any of you drink alcohol while doing CR? Let me just say that I've read studies done on alcohol and the effect it has on the human body, and I know it is not good for you overall. But I still sometimes make room for some wine and champagne in my daily calorie "allowance". I don't know how much of an impact this will have in the long run in regards to longevity, but I feel like the amount I consume is ok. What's you opinion on alcohol? And what do you think about the resveratrol found in red wine?
  3. victoria1

    Low BMI and health

    Hello again! I just thought I would write a little update here since it's been a while now. I have a BMI slightly under 16 and no one have said that I look like a skeleton or even commented that I look thin, probably because I have a small frame. I just look normal to other people obviously, so I am not worried. My doctor says I'm fine when I go for regular check-ups and I feel good. Still doing CR, haven't really changed much in my diet except cutting out cereals, which just seemed like unnecessary processed sugar to me and incorporated a bit more soups. I am changing up my diet continuously as I don't feel comfortable eating a lot of exactly the same food for long periods of time. But my diet still largely consists of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. For those who see this(just unrelated question): How do you feel about fats and protein in general and omega-3? Are macro nutrient ratio important to you?
  4. victoria1

    Low BMI and health

    Am I reading that right? You consider woman in the photo I posted (model Constance Jablonski who has a BMI of 16) to be "not very thin"? Please correct me if I'm misinterpreting your words, since if you really think that, it seems a bit troubling to me. and: Wow - I'm impressed. You've really got your head in the game at 21 - Good for you! I didn't realize from your first post how serious you were, and how your goal is to optimize health and longevity. Now that I know better where you hope to be headed, I've got some bad news for you. Your doctor and mom are (almost certainly) right. A BMI of 16 is riskier to maintain than a "healthy" BMI in the neighborhood of 20-22, if the available data is to be believed (which, admittedly, some smart people dispute). The evidence is discussed in great detail several places on these forums, most notably in this thread about the Optimal Late-Life BMI for Longevity (short answer at least a BMI of 21-22, probably closer to 25-26), and more relevant for you since you're young, this one called Will Serious CR Beat a Healthy Obesity-Avoiding Diet & Lifestyle (short answer based on the evidence as I see it - 'No'), and this one called Relationship between BMI and Disease, Longevity (which also points to 21-22 being the optimal BMI in middle age, even for healthy non-smokers), and finally this one called Body Mass Index and All-Cause Mortality (same conclusion). If you are really serious, I recommend you read all four of those threads and judge for yourself based on the evidence presented. As for the explanation for why it's not so good to be very thin, I recommend reading this post in particular from the third of those four threads (and elaborated here in the fourth) for a range of explanations, including what I still think is the best explanation via an analogy between the survival of chubby "flasks" and skinny "test tubes" in a laboratory setting. In short, being extremely thin like you are might not be so bad at age 21, since your body is fairly bulletproof (he says with irony and great sadness almost exactly 2 years to the day since losing to cancer someone he loved dearly and who would be about your age now...). But being very thin makes you more "fragile" at any age, and less able to recover from health challenges and setbacks caused by injury or disease, and therefore more likely to succumb to them. This fragility disadvantage of being very thin grows with age, but so do the negative effects of being overweight/obese. So the sweet spot appears to be a BMI in the low 20s (25-26 when older) where you have enough meat on your bones to weather life's slings and arrows, but not so much to as to damage your health via an increased risk of major killers, like CVD, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease. So there you have it. I know it's not what you want to hear, but if you seriously want to maximize your chance of living a long and healthy life, ironically my advice would be to forget about CR per se, gain some weight (to a BMI of at least 18), while eating a super-healthy diet and pursuing a healthy (physically and mentally active) lifestyle. I'll be curious if any of the heavyweights around here (figuratively speaking, of course. You know who you are) would care to chime in with a contrary perspective. If not, I rest my case in advance... --Dean Thank your for the informative post and I will definitely keep all that in mind for the future. But as I said to Matt above, I have come to the opinion that I will disregard the whole BMI aspect, at least for now. I agree that it might be worth thinking about when I am older. I feel like striving to fit into a specific category or number will not really do me anything good. I already feel great!
  5. victoria1

    Low BMI and health

    Thank you for sharing your experience. I still feel like I am doing the right thing by listening to my body, even after reading the threads Dean linked in the post above. After a lot of research and from my own experience, I have come to the conclusion that, for me personally, BMI is a fairly useless indicator of health. My blood tests, energy levels and mental health tell a lot more. And I get all the necessary nutrients and exercise.
  6. victoria1

    Low BMI and health

    Thanks for your answer Todd! My goal is to do a lifelong "experiment" and see for myself if the science is right, so essentially my goal is to live a longer, healthier and happier life. So you're right, that is what matters to me, not my weight and BMI. But my doctor kind of disagree, and it seems like many others do too. So I wonder why that is? Is really BMI an important diagnostic tool? And may I ask why you think it seems risky? My doctor made me think that my BMI is important, but didn't stress about it because all my bloodwork came back fine. Why do you think it is not enough? I have been thinking about this a lot and I would rather disregard my BMI and weight than gaining weight, and possibly feel worse, just so I can have a "normal" BMI number. I just turned 21, so I am quite young. I hope that by starting CRON now, I will be able to get the benefits from it, as I said above, if the science really is right. Thank you for the tip, I have just ordered a scale that measures weight, body fat and muscle mass. It also said that it measures bone mass, but not bone density which can only be measured by doing a scan. So I wonder how do I know if I am loosing bone density? I do exercise once a day and I do mostly resistance training at home. The only "cardio" I get is from walking, about 20-30 minutes each day, so not a lot but better than nothing. I will try to track my daily intake tomorrow, but I am sure it is good because I did track it when I first started and I haven't changed much since than really.
  7. victoria1

    Low BMI and health

    Thanks, I will keep updating. I am glad I found a community where people are supportive and understand what I am doing.
  8. victoria1

    Low BMI and health

    A low BMI per se is not a problem, and many of us experience more energy when practicing a healthy, CR diet. You're doing the right thing getting blood tests, and it's good to hear they all look good. Dropping to a BMI of 16 on CR is relatively uncommon, but not unheard of, particularly in women. As long as it doesn't become an eating disorder, the biggest things to worry about are amenorrhea (which might or might not be a problem), but which might be accompanied by osteoporosis. Some of us also have concerns about sarcopenia (loss of muscle mass), which may cause trouble as we get older. We hope that exercise (particularly resistance training and weight bearing exercise) can attenuate the bone and muscle loss, but only time will tell. Some of us are also experimenting with whole body vibration therapy for bone and muscle health. Also watch out for getting sick frequently, or if your energy drops off once you've been at CR for a while longer. Those are other signs you're likely to be going too far. Hope this helps! --Dean Thank you for your response Dean! What you are saying makes a lot of sense and I try to exercise every day to be sure I don't loose muscle mass. Amenorrhea is not really a problem, at least not yet as I still get my period. I am also aware of that people with eating disorders like anorexia often has a low BMI, but as far as I know it is complex mental illness that goes way beyond just food and weight so I am not worried about that me suddenly getting an eating disorder. I have not lost a lot of weight since I started practicing CR with optimal nutrition, maybe 7 kg in about 6 months. And it does not seem like I am dropping more weight, so I think it might just be my body getting used to the new lifestyle. The thing is that I feel amazing. And it would never occurred to me to calculate my BMI if it wasn't for my doctors concern. Before CR I often felt lethargic, depressed and had acne. Now my acne has almost gone away, I am no longer depressed and I have a lot of energy to do things I want and exercise. I now exercise almost every day, before I hardly had energy for 1 workout a week. I don't get sick more often than before either. But I am still worried about that BMI number. I am not sure why, because every other aspect of my health is great. Maybe because it has been pushed as an fairy important tool for assessing your health status my medical professionals? It's just a formula.. This picture is actually a very accurate representation of how my body looks. I am not very muscular, but not very thin. When it comes to my diet it is based on a lot of whole grains, fruits and vegetables. I also eat some pasta, potatoes and rice.
  9. victoria1

    Low BMI and health

    Hi! I am new here but have been practicing calorie restriction for about 6 months now and I must say I have never felt better. The only thing that has kind of been on my mind lately is my BMI, only because my doctor pointed out that I looked thin and wanted to weigh me when I went in to his office to get blood testes done. All of the testes came back great. He calculated my BMI to be around 16 which is classified as underweight. I knew that I had lost some weight because my clothes got a bit looser, but I feel really good, have tons of energy and just overall in good health that it never occurred to me to check my weight and BMI. Since my doctors visit I have been kind of worried, even though I feel great and my bloodwork is fine. And BMI doesn't really say that much about your health, but I just can't get it out of my head. So I was wondering if any of you have had similar experiences? Or any knowlege about just how important BMI really is for your overall health?
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