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Sibiriak

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  1. Sibiriak

    Jeanne Calment was a fraud?!!

    --------------------------------------------------------- What is the evidence that it is possible to calibrate diets precisely, correctly and reliably for each individual (at every stage in their life)? How do you suggest that should be done? And what is the evidence that "calibrating" diets precisely, using whatever method you propose, means in all but extreme cases more than just tweaking the application of some general healthy -diet principles? "Any truly optimal diet will need to be tailored to the particular individual " seems to me to be a truism. On the other hand, if you want to describe what you think is the best method to systematically individualize diets, that might be interesting If, however, this precise individual diet calibration you propose can't be done in a reliable, systematic, scientifically-proven way at this point in time, what are the implications of that fact? If your claim is basically a rebuttal of that clear impossibility, then it may be exactly correct, but profoundly trivial.
  2. Sibiriak

    The Top 10 Companies Working to Increase Longevity

    It's all hype.😈
  3. I'll probably get my IGF-1 tested in the near future, largely out of curiosity, but an IGFBP-3 test doesn't seem feasible for me at this time, not to mention IGF-I KIRA, lol. Ideally, my level won't deviate too drastically from Longo's suggested 140 ng/ml, but if it comes in quite low I would consider increasing my protein intake (currently is around .7g/kg), something I would be expecting to do anyway at some future point following the Longo/Levine/Fontana lines of thought.
  4. It's critical to note that IGF-1 bioactivity, as measured in that 2008 study, is not the same as total IGF-1 or free IGF-1. Low Circulating Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Bioactivity in Elderly Men Is Associated with Increased Mortality (2008) https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/93/7/2515/2598506 Also this proviso should be kept in mind: And there is this key point:
  5. Sibiriak

    TMAO & Cardiovascular Disease

     Btw, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) set an Adequate Intake (AI) level for choline at 400 mg/day for all adults. The EFSA lays out its rationale in excruciating detail in a seventy page report: Dietary Reference Values for choline First published: 17 August 2016 https://efsa.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.2903/j.efsa.2016.4484
  6. Sibiriak

    TMAO & Cardiovascular Disease

    Chris Masterjohn: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/blog/2019/04/17/the-choline-database/ I'd like to know the scientific bases for those assertions. I'm not saying they don't exist, but he doesn't provide references. I've had this problem before with some of his assertions (eg. his claim about ideal homocysteine levels).
  7. Sibiriak

    TMAO & Cardiovascular Disease

    Saul, low-dose aspirin is not an analgesic, period. You need higher doses to get any analgesic effect. Regarding GI bleeding, no one is saying that l.d. aspirin doesn't increase the risk of significant bleeding at all, but the absolute risk remains quite low, and is reduced much further in those who don't have any predisposing GI bleeding risk conditions and take protective action. But this is not the place to debate it, and I'm not recommending anything anyway, so I'll leave it at that for now.
  8. Sibiriak

    TMAO & Cardiovascular Disease

    I found the following to be a good, up-to-date, fairly comprehensive review of the TMAO issue (covering neurodegenerative as well as cardiovascular disease): Implication of Trimethylamine N-Oxide (TMAO) in Disease: Potential Biomarker or New Therapeutic Target Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1398; https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/10/10/1398/htm I think you might find this interesting as well: How TMAO Fooled Us https://lesslikely.com/nutrition/tmao-mendelian-randomization/ It takes a skeptical albeit narrowly-focused look at TMAO as a causal factor in cardiovascular disease, delving into a lot of general methodological issues (eg. confounding) while focusing on a very recent mendelian randomization study: Assessment of Causal Direction Between Gut Microbiota-Dependent Metabolites and Cardiometabolic Health: A bi-Directional Mendelian Randomisation Analysis (2019) https://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2019/06/05/db19-0153
  9. Sibiriak

    TMAO & Cardiovascular Disease

    I agree. I wasn't recommending low--dose aspirin, just adding to the TMAO-related info. (It might be useful for someone already taking low-dose aspirin for other reasons.) (I have deeply researched the low-dose aspirin gastrointestinal bleeding issue, though, and I believe the risk (especially absolute risk) is very low for those who are are at low risk to begin with --there are many factors that increase GI bleeding risk--and who include gastroprotective elements in their diet as well. But I don't want to get into that discussion here; there are already other threads on aspirin.) Personally, I'm not at all concerned about TMAO. I follow a low-calorie, low-protein, moderate-fat, plant-based diet, with about 100g fish/wk, no meat, no eggs, (close to Valter Longo's suggestions)-- and I don't take choline or l-carnitine supplements. Furthermore, I'm not at any particular risk for CV disease. So I just don't see TMAO as an actionable issue for me. I do find the topic very interesting though-- it's fascinatingly complex in many ways, and rather paradigmatic of the complexities associated with a number of other controversial health "biomarkers."
  10. Sibiriak

    TMAO & Cardiovascular Disease

    Anti-TMAO effects of low-dose aspirin have already been cited in another thread https://www.crsociety.org/topic/16821-basic-blood-tests/?page=2&tab=comments#comment-29329 but I thought I'd bring up the topic here as well. Gut Microbe-Generated TMAO from Dietary Choline Is Prothrombotic in Subjects (2018) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5460631/
  11. Sibiriak

    TMAO & Cardiovascular Disease

    Yes, Saul, that's a bit strange.
  12. Sibiriak

    TMAO & Cardiovascular Disease

    Soluble Dietary Fiber Reduces Trimethylamine Metabolism via Gut Microbiota and Co-Regulates Host AMPK Pathways (2017) Li Q1, et al. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28884952/
  13. Sibiriak

    TMAO & Cardiovascular Disease

    .Plasma trimethylamine-N-oxide following supplementation with vitamin D or D plus B vitamins (2017) Obeid R1,2, et al. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27569255/
  14. Sibiriak

    TMAO & Cardiovascular Disease

    FWIW, the authors of Becoming Vegan: Comprehensive Edition: The Complete Reference to Plant-Base Nutrition see no problem meeting choline requirements with a reasonable vegan diet:
  15. Sibiriak

    TMAO & Cardiovascular Disease

    Finally, It's possible that some of Gynostemma's beneficial effects derive from an ability to decrease TMAO levels. One more rat study! (TomB loves these.) Metabonomics Study of the Therapeutic Mechanism of Gynostemma pentaphyllum and Atorvastatin for Hyperlipidemia in Rats (2013) https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0078731
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