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mccoy

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About mccoy

  • Birthday 01/01/1960

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  1. Interesting recount which also explains how much individual variability biologically exists in this and other aspects of ther human physiology and metabolism. The fact that the muscles didn't grow may be due to a variety of factors, among which a genetic overexpression of myostatin- related genes. People who don't grow much mass have a definite advantage in all sports organized in weight classes where strength is one of the governing factors. For example, wrestling, boxing, martial arts, even in speed running where you need to maximize leg strength while minimizing body mass. My own case was maybe the opposite of yours in that I could gain mass easily up to a certain plateau. After that I had to force growth by more rest (minimizing the AMPK signal), more strenuos exercise and more food. Interestingly enough, I never forced myself to gorge like bodybuilders do, but I followed the natural hunger which was a neurological signal of an intrinsic need of nutrients, needed to signal mTOR in musculoskeletal tissues. I wonder which of the two phenotypes is more favourable to longevity, bulging versus non-bulging muscles. Maybe none, other factors govern.
  2. mccoy

    Cake fit for human consumption

    Dangerous suggestion, I would devour the cake in a single meal!
  3. mccoy

    Path to Longevity (new book) by Luigi Fontana

    It may be that Fontana doesn't know the article, it may be that he doesn't consider it decisive.
  4. This is a cake which I deem fit for human consumption, whereas most commercial cakes and pastries I do not regard as a food. My wife makes it at least once a month. Whole grain, stone ground wheat flour, dark muscovado sugar, 4 eggs, non-processed cacao powder, cinnamon, ground skin of 2 lemons. To call it delicious is a huge understatement. And delicious+nourishing is a nice combo.
  5. mccoy

    On Vacay in Mexico

    Mike I agree with Fontana in making it simple, since that's a book targeted at the whole population, whereas my excessive nit-picking is coherent with the degree of orthorexia exercised by the users of this forum. As you say, my impression is that Fontana is strongly against an excess of protein, which can be generally described as quantities significantly higher than the RDA. Especially so animal protein. The fact about defining excess remains though, it may be that we are exceeding even with amounts equal to the RDA. But I agree that this concept may be dangerous. Theonly experimenting I did in regard was limiting protein to RDA-ish values and limiting carbs to 50-100 grams per day (to me that's a low carb diet). That regime made me loose fat and muscle mass even though I was exercising, so I probably went into negative nitrogen balance. I might not have experienced that eating more carbs, or I might have experience a maintenance of muscle mass without an increase of it.
  6. mccoy

    Path to Longevity (new book) by Luigi Fontana

    The routine you mention is not bad at all, even though might be improved, something like a session with 10X10 pull-ps, 25X5 push-ups and 10X10 dips. That's more time-consuming but it's a powerful free-body session. You might even alternate, one day such an upper body routine, another day squats, planks, other legs exercises and cardio. The fact that vegan protein can maintain and even increase muscle mass is a sure thing. Natural vegan bodybuilders like Torre Washington and Nimai Delgado are an example. But there are other factors. One is hunger and digestive power. The strongman Patrick Baboumian eats 400 grams of vegan protein per day including huge dishes of beans and protein powders, I doubt most vegan guys would be able to gorge so much. With your 130% percent you should be able to boost muscle protein synthesis, but probably you need more calories and more carbs.
  7. mccoy

    Path to Longevity (new book) by Luigi Fontana

    I've been reading a few parts of Fontana's book today. Excellent summary, I particularly appreciated his views on optimal markers of health (as low as possible, within range, as high as possible). In other parts, he ends his discussion on a rather moderate stance (for example, CR not necessary to decrease much). He cites the CR monkeys studies as if they had been conclusive about the benefits of CR (in this forum the results have been judged less conclusive on inconclusive). Re. bodyweight, it's one of those parameters which must be kept in range, he cites 18.5 as the lower bound (is that it or 18 or 19? Starting to suffer some memory impairment!!). Very interesting, the studies where optimal blood glucose is a function of HDL. He's also a supporter of as low as possible LDL and cites interesting lipids indexes like the non-HDL cholesterol which may be more indicative than mere LDL, since it includes VLDL particles as well.
  8. mccoy

    On Vacay in Mexico

    Mike, I'll show that the sentence "WE must avoid consuming too much protein" is not very clear or precise. For, example: how much is too much? Answer, interpreting from the Fontana book: beyond the WHO RDA of 0.8 g/kg/d, protein intake starts being too much. That's not necessarily true, though, according to the RDA of the WHO (which is by the way applied to many nutrients). The 0.8 value is the 97.5 percentile of the statistical distribution fo all requirements, from the study of Randd et al., 2003. Hence, it constitutes a cautious estimate, an estimate which is already high. The RDA itself might be, for some people, twice the amount of the minimum requirement. This may be too much protein, since for the low percentiles of minimum requirement, the statistical distribution indicates values which are really low. But they are true, if the method (nitrogen balance) and the measurements are reliable. The following figure is drawn from the official WHO reference. Most people studied are all right (zero nitrogen balance) with 0.63 g/kg/d, but a few of'em are all right with 0.5 or even 0.4 g/kg/d. So, we might argue that the RDA itself is too much protein for some people. Of course, this implies that beyond the RDA is too much protein for almost all people, barring some outliers. A confounding factor, which has not been studied in that publication that I know, is the consumption of carbs. Many carbs seem to have a so called sparing effect of proteins. So for those who eat many carbs, the 0.8 RDA might statistically be too much. But that's not necessarily true. So, the random aspect of the minimum protein requirements is such that the requirement is individual, varies within a large range and we really don't know where we belong in terms of the random variable (minimum requirement). The above having been said, the only way to figure out if we are eating too many, too little, or just the right amount of protein is to experiment ourselves. And that's not an easy thing to do at all, we might use muscle mass as a proxy of nitrogen balance and measure ourselves with a caliper on three body parts for example.
  9. mccoy

    On Vacay in Mexico

    I'm more in favour of longevity with reasonable health or without serious mental and physical conditions. The actuarial data on longevity ignore the QOL factor but someone suggested a difference of 7 years between average life expectancy and average life expectancy with QOL. Probably for both sexes, so the female advantage would remain. That's perhaps one reason why there are so few ladies in this forum. They need to worry less!!!
  10. mccoy

    Path to Longevity (new book) by Luigi Fontana

    I just read chapter form 13 on of Fontana's book. In one part he seems really to suggest bodybuilding exercises and some reps scheme are just done to maximize hypertrophy. In other parts he seems to suggest free-body exercises and of course, aerobics is always good. In support of resistance exercise, he cites growth of muscle and bones, so prevention of osteopenia is another important aspect of resistance training. So, at the end, what Dr. Fontana hates is the exaggeration in some bodybuilding regimes and the abuse of protein and carbs. But that's a part where almost everyone agrees I believe. What I repeat that muscle and bones need amminoacids to get stronger and resilient. A mere RDA regime may be not enough for intense resistance exercise.
  11. mccoy

    On Vacay in Mexico

    Sibiriak, thanks for the conspicuos flow of info. I was previously referring to the lack of clinical trials in 105 old skinny women. But maybe there are...
  12. mccoy

    On Vacay in Mexico

    Clinton, as a matter of fact I noticed that some bodybuilders like to start a vegan diet as a challenge, sometimes a public challenge. It almost seems that it takes more skill to get big on vegan protein, whereas everyone is able to get big with animal protein!
  13. mccoy

    On Vacay in Mexico

    MMmmmm...., who says that if the lady had access to a gym and practiced light resistance training she may have added a few years to her life? There are no clinical trials on it so it's all speculation, which Sibiriak doesn't seem to like....
  14. mccoy

    On Vacay in Mexico

    The conceptual truth is that muscle mass is useless and useful at the same time. For example, muscle mass is believed to be an efficient glucose sink and blah blah. But men, with greater muscle mass, usually exhibit not less glycemia than women, AFAIK, with lesser muscle mass. On the other side when training for hypertrophy bones and ligaments also hypertrophize as well and strength and some coordination develop. More muscle mass works as shock absober in accidents, without the detriment of adipose tissue, and bones are more resilient. More muscle mass constitutes a reserve of amminoacids readily available if we have to go to intensive care or are in coma after an accident. Or we want to undergo a fast. Training for strength and coordination will prevent falls. So, just applying common sense, hypertrophy and strength + coordination training can indisputably provide a longevity benefit, if not for metabolic reasons, as a preventive measure against seriously detrimental outcomes. Not sure they will happen, but a statistical possibility indeed. Another distinct advantage of resistance training (confirmed by Valter Longo): the production if IGF-1 by muscle tissue metabolism, which may prevent a detrimental decrease in IGF-1 without eating much methionine. And, last but not least, the mental benefits of the sense of well being which comes with exercise, possibly related to the production of Brain Neurotrophic Factor...
  15. mccoy

    On Vacay in Mexico

    I agree, although I'm critic about the aversion towards some animal products like dairy products and eggs. They may even help to eat less protein, since their protein are more available. so you may settle for an RDA of 0.7 g/kg/d with mixed source protein and with cronometer you can sure optimize leucine and methionine. And, why nobody talks about the digestibility issue? Yogurt and cheese to some people is many times more easily digestible than legumes and tofu.
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