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biohacked

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About biohacked

  • Birthday 04/12/1992

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  1. Hey, created a tutorial on how to get fitness/sports t-shirts with your own designs for dirt cheap - use my discount code: FIFTEEN on checkout! It's pretty fun to mess around with these! Got 2 with my cats photo lol
  2. Soy is widely known in health circles as pro-estrogenic and feminizing and men are recommended to avoid it. If that’s actually the case, can anyone explain why serum estrogen levels actually decrease in soy-supplemented groups in studies in both men and women? And why is there an inverse relationship between hormone dependent cancers such as breast and prostate cancer (I suppose all cancers are hormone dependent) and soy consumption? Here are just some of the studies I’m talking about: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8770469 - 36-oz of daily soymilk consumption for a month significantly decreased serum 17 beta-estradiol levels in premenopausal women. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9839524 - Estrone and estradiol levels were decreased by 23% and 27% at the end of the study in the soy milk supplemented group in Japanese women. The change in estrone and estradiol levels was minor in the control, non-soy group. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11303585 - Serum estrone concentrations decreased in the soy-supplemented group in Japanese men. There was no change in testosterone levels in both the soy group and the control group. Is it that the estrogen circulation in blood decreases from soy but estrogen level inside the cell increases? Is that why soy is so widely considered as ‘estrogenic’?
  3. Been thinking about this ever since I read Kurzweil’s book ‘Transcend’. Many people might already be familiar with his ideas and his theory of exponential growth and how that will affect our health and longevity. Here’s the latest interview with him where he succintly summarizes his predictions about the future of health, aging and biotechnology: [media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpzXWGrngTw[/media] Thoughts? What do you think are the holes/blind spots in his arguments?
  4. There’s little question that fish contain environmental pollutants such as mercury and PCBs with, generally, bigger fish such as shark and tuna containing more and smaller fish like sardines containing less. That’s been common knowledge between health researchers for a while now. The real question is whether that translates into any of the major degenerative diseases in people (such as cancer or diabetes). Well, sadly, in the case of diabetes it does appear to be the case. Here’s a great video by Dr. Michael Greger summarizing the science between diabetes risk and fish consumption: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I60O474F_GI As he mentioned in the video, besides the pollutants, the causal link could also very well be the oxidative stress causing n-3 fatty acid content of the fish. That obviously goes against the mainstream opinion on diet but one can certainly find smart people that would support that notion and as far as I’ve seen the research on fish oil seems to be quite mixed. P.S. Is there actually a way to embed a video on this site instead of just posting a link? Thanks.
  5. The strategies are pretty standard but still pretty interesting for anyone who’s looked into ‘biohacking’. The guy is a CEO of a company that does half a billion dollars a year in revenue so he definitely has to be high performing. Funny enough he follows a ketogenic diet, fasts frequently and uses ssri’s for mood improvement. Here’s his whole protocol: https://hackernoon.com/im-32-and-spent-200k-on-biohacking-became-calmer-thinner-extroverted-healthier-happier-2a2e846ae113
  6. For anyone who’s looked into and reasearched the health effects of different omega-6 containing vegetable oils, you’ll quickly find that there’s a strong connection between all of them and the major degenerative diseases such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, alzheimer’s and even obesity. Here are a couple of excerpts from the full text studies that I found particularily interesting: On obesity from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23249760: ‘Recent studies have emphasized the proadipogenic properties of the omega-6 PUFA, and provided evidence that rodents fed on diets with omega-6 PUFA contents similar to the typical US diet (6–8% energy) have an increased fat mass. Importantly, recent studies have shown that perinatal exposure to a high omega-6 PUFA diet results in a progressive accumulation of body fat across generations.’ On chronic disease from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18408140: ‘Excessive amounts of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a very high omega-6/omega-3 ratio, as is found in today’s Western diets, promote the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases...’ On chronic disease from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22570770: ‘...high intake of n-6 PUFA, along with low intakes of n-3 PUFA, shifts the physiological state to one that is proinflammatory and prothrombotic with increases in vasospasm, vasoconstriction, and blood viscosity and the development of diseases associated with these conditions.’ So if you HAVE to cook with oil (which I don’ t recommend) using something like MCT oil or adding olive oil to salad might be less harmful compared to n-6 oils. Even then, fats in general, also those in olive oil have been connected to diabetes and MCT oil/coconut oil has some pretty potent cholesterol raising effects. This is certainly common knowledge around here but I find that researching these connections on my own gives me a more complete understanding rather than just taking somebody’s word for it. I find it’s also easier to stay on a diet and avoid the harmful foods if you are constantly reading studies and seeing evidence everywhere on their negative effects yourself. If you have more reaserch to add, I’d appreciate it.
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