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GhostofCircleKnight

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  1. GhostofCircleKnight

    Mycotoxins and aflatoxins in cereals/pseudocereals

    To be frank, I don't know how accurate the FoundMyFitness report is. There are problems associated with the conclusions of present genetic tests to begin with regard to SNPs, but even if yours is accurate, I don't know the extent of the problem or the confounding variables. I will give Rhonda the benefit of the doubt, but I need better data. For instance. How poor? Most b-12 gummies or tablets are 1000%+ percent, and some animals or animal products have little to no b-12 at all, hence why the animals themselves are supplemented. Very poor beta-carotene conversion- how poor compared to the average? Does a particular SNP render 10% less conversion, for instance, or 90%? From what I know about beta-carotene processing mutations, usually I'd expect something around the ballpark of 50% less conversion on average, + or - 20%. But thankfully it is easy to get 1000% the required pro-vitamins eating yellow- orange or green vegetables, so even if conversion was impaired, the limiting factor is how fast the body can convert rather than if it is getting enough of a pro-vitamin. This way there are no risks of vitamin A toxicity. Perhaps though this is a greater problem in old age compared to youth. Still, aside from b-carotene, what about other carotenoids that might be converted to retinol differently? There are a lot more unknowns. While I am sympathetic toward your conclusion that veganism or vegetarianism may be difficult given your conditions, aside from gluten intolerance, I don't have much to go on. Ultimately serum measurements of retinol, b-12, homocysteine, would be the final say in all of this.
  2. GhostofCircleKnight

    Mycotoxins and aflatoxins in cereals/pseudocereals

    1. Yes, I am glad for this discussion and also believe we both made defendable points. 2. Yeah that makes sense, and I can for the most part concur. Though I may add it may be percent protein that also matters. Since people incorporating animal products have higher protein intakes in terms of macro % in general, I don't know to what degree the studies on the effect of whey vs plant proteins on rising IGF took this confounding variable into consideration. Vegans have lower igf, sure, but they also eat less protein in terms of %s. A perfect experiment would compare the IGF levels of keto and non-keto vegans and non-vegans who eat the same amount of macro protein, but I have not been able to find that. 3. Interesting hypothesis, and reasonable given the catabolic state, best of fortune in that pursuit. 4. One thing for certain, it appears IGF-1 signalling declines with age, so higher protein intake is advisable as one ages. But I'm generally young so I can get away with a 13% protein diet, but every decade following I may bump it up by 1%. Didn't know about the Laron dwarfs, will go and give them a read. Regarding contamination, I accept that recommendation and moderate that which I know is more risky (like the rice). I'm glad that it is not something I have to worry about too much so long as regulation controls remain operable and present.
  3. GhostofCircleKnight

    Mycotoxins and aflatoxins in cereals/pseudocereals

    1) It is not an unqualified statement. We have studies linking higher animal protein intake to an earlier death. Without data on how it affects the average human being, it is like throwing darts blindfolded. After we have some idea, then we can personalize our diet, and sure, one's mileage may vary per food item, but as a whole our biologies are more similar than they are different if we are reductionist about it. Generally most animal products have a lot more in common when juxtaposed with plant foods, but yes it is a spectrum with fish arguably not being as bad as say, carcinogenic processed meat. For your case I certainly didn't recommend a low fat plantbased diet, even if others erroneously did the past, but I see you didn't comment about my mention of a high fat, higher protein plantbased keto diet and its potential merits. 2) Generally speaking, the plant proteins I have consumed in the past had ample amounts of leucine and methionine (and cysteine for the glutathionine) (they were made out of peas and rice). But I think it is fair to state that even at equal doses of those two amino acids, (at least compared to fast acting whey), they would have a smaller, but not insignificant, mtor effect. And this is likely because whey protein has either a different combination ratio of other amino acids to leu/met or it could be the presence of some small amount of growth factors/hormones present in the whey protein (perhaps). Nevertheless, unless attempted or measured by yourself, we'd have no data if it were just as ideal or not. >In addition to the whey protein I eat a lot of eggs, fatty fish and organ meats, especially liver and heart, for a variety of reasons. This sounds a bit dangerous to be honest (risk of vitamin A toxicity from the liver), but I wish you the best. B12 isn't hard to come by with fortified foods or supplements one could take once one a week. And unless a person is eating the level of animal products you are they are likely deficient in or have sub optimal b-12 anyway. In fact, factory farmed animals get routinely supplemented with b-12 too because they are not fed the foods that allow for optimal growth of the bacteria that makes it. I believe your body slows its production of endogenous creatine once creatine stores reach max, but I don't know what your daily dose is estimated to be. I do not have enough data to indicate if high carnitine or carnosine is a good thing, but if one's body's own production of these two decline with age, supplementing or getting them from diet may not be a bad idea. In fact, high carnitine may be a bad thing due to higher TMAO production. Micronutrients aren't hard to come by on a plant based diet, except if one was a fruititarian or starchitarian and the like. Actually animal sources are not the best sources of omega-3s because omega-3s found in fish tend to have a higher peroxide value, on average. I am basing my evidence off of fish oil, and actual fish may be even worse due to higher air exposure. https://labdoor.com/rankings/fish-oil/quality https://labdoor.com/rankings/vegan-omega-3/quality 3) Best wishes regarding this category and I hope you avoid both cancer and heart disease and that the LDL stays under control. Though given LDL, isn't the case where size of the particle matters more than number of the particle? I'm ignorant regarding this category and it is something I haven't researched thoroughly. 4) Keto still perplexes me. I'm glad in your case/condition that the benefits were remarkable and in line with the available data, but I can't explain why it has the opposite effect in some other cases (albeit not SBMA cases). But I maintain open and eager to see what keto can and cannot do!
  4. GhostofCircleKnight

    Mycotoxins and aflatoxins in cereals/pseudocereals

    Kennedy's disease does not sound pleasant and I am sorry this condition is something you have to have to live with. And it is unfortunate to hear pharmacological inventions failed, and if anything, were harmful. I can at least in part understand given certain health issues of my own. Nevertheless Todd, while my comment was not meant to be an emotional trigger, the typical paleo diet is not good for the average human. The need for higher IGF levels in your case is certainly warranted to counteract the effects of the SBMA condition, but high protein diets (like paleo) generally age people faster and are responsible for a more rapid introduction of terrible illnesses none of us wants have. And the jury on keto longterm is still out, at least in my opinion, so I shall refrain from judgement on that. Both points are something to be mindful of, lest my previous comment be taken out of context. It is a source great news hearing that your dietary interventions have led to improvements of health, and indeed your version of the keto diet (which I assume is higher protein because of paleo) seems to have played a part in doing so (but I don't know if it had/has a net +, -, or mixed effect long-term). But as great as hearing your triumphant anecdote is at least in the present, it does not take away from the fact that, as a whole, animal products (granted it is a spectrum) are not good for most people or at best neutral in terms of pros/cons. And this may sound audacious to say, but there is a chance you may have acquired similar benefits with a keto plantbased diet that utilized protein powders, TVP, or higher protein nuts/seeds/legumes to elicit the same effect of increased muscle mass and higher Igf-1. Due to a lack of data and it being focused on one individual, at least on my part, I cannot conclude it would be supreme or that would definitely be the case, but I can suggest that this outcome may be just as viable, without the animal products we know are harmful in other ways. Still, my opinions aside, I wish you the best of health.
  5. GhostofCircleKnight

    Mycotoxins and aflatoxins in cereals/pseudocereals

    There is a lack of consistency in the reports, and (while I assume they are legitimate in that they are scientific articles) perhaps I do not know how to interpret the numbers and whether it is significant or not (gut knowledge tells me it is not significant, but I will have to verify. Perhaps, it leads me to purchase grains grown in one region over another (where there are stricter regulations)). I will spend some more time reading them and post some links later. Yeah it's bad enough the paleo people don't understand how bad the animal products they consume is bad for them, and I don't mean to give them a 'point' on this. Regarding the rice, that's unfortunate to hear, but useful to know. Thanks, and from this point forward I'll limit my rice consumption to 1 uncooked cup a week and try to only buy rice from Cali.
  6. GhostofCircleKnight

    Mycotoxins and aflatoxins in cereals/pseudocereals

    Hey Saul, Thanks for your comment. I only CR up to 5%, but try my best to protein restrict (keep protein less than 15% of total calories). As such, cereals make it sort of easy, as the ones I consume (steel-cut oats, colored quinoa, black rice) tend to be lower in protein (10-14%) and generally have low-medium GIs (40 to 55). I have trouble eating large amounts of food (and I time restrict eat, my window is 6-8 hours per day), so it being a little calorically dense makes things a bit easier. Sodium doesn't appear to an issue thankfully, as I only consume it in whole grain and not pasta/bread form. The lack of nutrient denseness (at least compared to beans) is a problem, but I hope to make up for it for certain phytonutrients.
  7. Hi CRsociety OGs, I'm relatively new to this quest, but came across some unsettling findings that indicate many of the cereals and pseudocereals consumed contain carcinogenic compounds (from fungal infections) like mycotoxins and aflatoxins. What can I do to minimize consumption of these and what are your strategies employed to do as such?
  8. GhostofCircleKnight

    5:2 or daily -10%

    Thanks Michael
  9. GhostofCircleKnight

    5:2 or daily -10%

    Hi CR society, I was wondering if anyone knew if 5:2 was better than a 10% reduction in consumed calories and if any studies have been done on this. Since I normally eat 2000 calories a day, CR would take me to about 1800 calories, which adds up to 12600 calories a week. However, with 5:2, this would be something like 11,200 calories a week since I'd eat 600 on my fasting days. Thanks for the time you take to answer my inquiry.
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