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Mike41

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  1. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/5/9/e007118 and another study not very encouraging for cholesterol lowering I am not going to dig it up. But there is extensive research and data showing people with familial hypercholesteremia die in their 30s 40s and fifties. My father and his brother, cousin and his father all died in their mid forties from very high cholesterol. 350-400. Now here is my take on all of this and I have dug into it extensively. The fact that very high is very bad leads to over treatment possibly. For instance my mom is 91 and totally without any chronic illness nor signs of dementia. Her lifetime cholesterol levels have been mid 200s. Doctor wanted her to take statins years ago and she refused. This is not at all uncommon in the general population. cholesterol is manufactured for good reason. It’s not a silly mistake of nature. OTOH we have an epidemic of obesity, diabetes, terrible junk food addictions, smoking, lack of exercise etc. it’s complex iows. If the system is overwhelmed with cholesterol and cannot handle it then it’s bad news. But how far do we go to lower it. Very low ldl levels are definitely associated with less heart disease, but there tends to be higher cancer rates and again if the levels were higher and all the lifestyle conditions were favorable we just might see a disadvantage to very low levels. But that’s a guess. So it appears from Todd’s post and the one posted above and many more that we still just do not know if lowering cholesterol beyond very high levels has any benefit especially in those with relatively decent lifestyle like my Mom.
  2. Depends it seems based on what you cite and what you are most concerned with. IAC, It is always best to get nutrients within ones diet.
  3. Melatonin may partly explain the higher risk faced by the elderly https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmed.2020.00226/full
  4. could nicotine be effective in preventing cytokines from going bonkers?? https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2020.01359/full
  5. Al, I’m talking about the post prior to mine wrt metabolic disorders and the risk associated with covid. The White House covid task force scientists continually tell us to social distance and to wear masks. Why are they never, ever discussing and informing Americans about lifestyle and how important that is in reducing the risk of covid??
  6. Mike41

    Natto is the way to go!

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1271/bbb.120726 natto extract life extender?
  7. Mike41

    Natto is the way to go!

    Right, but I am wary of taking full dose nattokinase based on these conclusions from the article Dean Pomerleau sent. I have familial hypercholesterolemia and require maximum top strength statins. 40 mg of Crestor. It would be playing with fire imo to start taking high therapeutic doses of nattokinase. A current study they cite that still remains unpublished for unknown reasons excluded current statins users. I’ll stick with a safe and Been eaten for 1000s of years Natto for now. There are a few obstacles that remain to be overcome for NK to become more widely accepted as a drug, or drug candidate, for CVDs and these include establishment of pharmacokinetic evidence of the absorption and metabolism of NK in humans and the requirement for extensive studies to elucidate potential drug interactions between NK and other cardiovascular drugs, which are commonly, and concurrently, used in the prevention, treatment, and management of CVD in affected patients
  8. Mike41

    Natto is the way to go!

    https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/105/2/426/4637490 of particular interest in this well done study that controlled for confounders was that the higher the intake of natto the lower hemerogic strokes by a significant margin. There were also significant lowering of ischemic stroke and cvd dose based. This surprises me because natto is a blood thinner and one would expect an increase in hemorrhage.
  9. And we know this is a huge factor wrt covid and do any of the scientists who blab on and on about wearing masks ever once mention this to the millions of listeners. They never do. I have yet to hear Fauci, Gupta etc ever mention it.
  10. Mike41

    No wonder SCIENCE is scorned!

    Good points Tom! I just this morning listened to a podcast where the guest on with Chris Kessler used peanut butter as a vegan source Of protein in which he compared it to lean beef. He was obsessed with peanut butter and how much fat and calories it had compared to beef to get similar amount of protein. He was obsessed with peanut butter. He kept bringing it up as the vegan source of protein. I finally got fed up and figured he was a meat industry hack!
  11. Mike41

    Natto is the way to go!

    It also appears to be quite non toxic even ate crazy high doses https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30742876/
  12. Mike41

    No wonder SCIENCE is scorned!

    Ron Putt said: I have no idea why you see science as being "scorned" and why you try to connect it to wearing masks. my point was that science is a process and prone to failure which can be amplified by the news media and the so called scientists themselves. Hence the predimed fable that still prevails! Even the science people continue to quote it as an example of a low fat diet comparison group which is patently false and even acknowledged by the perpetrators of the phony claim. hence my comparison to masks. when we see science still fighting over low fat diets and a multitude of other subjects and going back and forth for decades then why should people believe masks Are protective. Of course I understand the innate complexity of NATURE and the monumental challenge to understanding how it works, and I deeply respect the scientific method. However that does not at all mean that the process is some kind of divine, holy path to truth. Not by a long shot!
  13. July 7, 2020 Statins Associated with Mortality Benefit in Older Adults By Joe Elia Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM Statin use is associated with lower mortality risk in older adults, according to a retrospective study in JAMA. Over 300,000 U.S. veterans aged 75 and older were followed for roughly 7 years. At the outset, all were free of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Death rates per 1000 person-years were 79 among new statin users and 98 among non-users. After adjustment for propensity scores, the hazard ratio for statin users was 0.75 for all-cause mortality and 0.80 for cardiovascular mortality, compared with non-users. Editorialists write that the results "provide a compelling argument for use of statins for primary prevention in older patients." NEJM Journal Watch General Medicine's Dr. Thomas Schwenk has summarized and commented on the study. See his take at the link below.
  14. So that explains it, I’ve often wondered how Trump got elected. Now I understand! 😂
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