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alexthegra8

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Everything posted by alexthegra8

  1. alexthegra8

    Fantastic news for caloric restriction enthusiasts!

    One must not forget, there will be total economic ruin across Europe if Russia applies counter sanctions. As with anything in life, sanctions are a double edged sword. Some Russian ministers have argued that the West will not survive without metals and fertilizers from Russia. Thus, the refusal to export fertilizers can have a negative impact not only on the European, but also on the world food market. This will cause a deficit and an increase in prices for products, since the Russian Federation is among the top 5 leading world producers of fertilizers, and two-thirds of its products are exported. The specialist noted that Russian retaliatory restrictive measures may affect the export of metals: nickel, palladium, aluminum and commodities. "Russia accounts for about 10-12 percent of world exports of nickel, 13 percent of titanium and 40 percent of palladium," she explained. Maksakova stressed that restrictions on the export of palladium can negatively affect the European automotive industry, and a ban on the export of nickel and cobalt can increase the cost of producing electric vehicles.
  2. alexthegra8

    War in Ukraine

    I think the point he makes in all of his work is that when it comes to "great" powers (i.e. big countries w/ nuclear arsenals), they act out of strategic interests, and such interests always will drive their behavior rather than international law/norms, rights, etc. The issue w/ Ukraine is that since 2014, it has had a very anti-Russian US/UK backed government (who has given it tens of billions in funding). It is not that different than Cuba in the late 1950s to be honest. His reference to Cuba/sanctions/the missile crisis, etc form the basis of his argument about contemporary Ukraine.
  3. alexthegra8

    War in Ukraine

    Putin's Invasion of Ukraine Salon | Ray McGovern, John Mearsheimer - YouTube
  4. It is surely important, but at the same time, in my view, it is difficult to differentiate the impact that such particles pose in comparison to all of the atmospheric pollution we tend to inhale in urban areas, the chemicals we rub into our bodies and hair (modern commercial cleaning products), and the chemicals that go into growing our food (both meat and veg). I think ultimately, village life in Siberia may give you the best odds of long term survival if one can limit their alcohol consumption : )
  5. My experience w/ low carb (whether regular meat/keto or veg/nuts) is that my cortisol shoots through the roof and sleep tends to suffer. In my view, obtaining optimal sleep is just as important as anything else (and may be the most important dynamic), which is why I don't even count carbs any more and stick to calorie thresholds -- if eating a carb heavy meal at the end of the day, I never will consume it after 19.
  6. alexthegra8

    Vaccine risks, injury and related topics

    Yes the actual virus will have a higher likelihood of impacting your circulatory system (and importantly, heart) than the vaccine. There is much that is unknown about covid (still), and it is totally unclear why some people develop blood clots and heart problems after having the virus, while others may show no symptoms (during infection) and after infection.
  7. alexthegra8

    Vaccine risks, injury and related topics

    I was vaccinated w/ both pfizer shots in June 2021; got Delta in January 2022. Had fever (not radically high, around 100.1) for 2 days, cold chills, body aches (literally everything hurt), then was fatigued for 3-4 days; followed by loss of taste/smell for 1 month. Now feel totally fine. What I really noticed during height of covid (fever) was that my appetite was still really good, so I just slammed a bunch of indian food, pizza, sushi, etc. Compared to influenza (which I have been sick w/ 2-3 times in my life), covid seemed like a virus that was 30% of the capacity of the flu.
  8. Which lends support to people who claim that rat/mice studies should not be considered at all for human longevity advice...When would rats ever eat watermelon in their evolutionary nature? Of course giving rats watermelon probably would not improve their metabolic characteristics...
  9. Dear all, my mother, 60 years old, diabetic (type 2), and daily smoker, recently had a 300g tumor removed from her kidney. In conjunction, she has been diagnosed w/ Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and is currently on the path to trying to get it treated... In my family, on both sides, AML has been a terminal illness (my father's mom, however, lived until age 90 with it likely due to being a healthy eater and not overweight). - My question is thus, how can I (32 year old male, 67kg, 176cm), go about in attempting to prevent what might be the inevitable? Of all terminal illnesses, cancer seems to be the one that is hardest to prevent (compared to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, etc). - I am on a CR diet (1500 cal per day), lift weights 4-5 times a week (20-30 min kettlebell work); ride around 100km on the bike each week (total around 3+ hours). Thank you for your responses,
  10. Amazing how the Czech Republic has a relatively low incidence rate; the average eating regimen here is highly fatty pork, fried cheese, bread, potatoes, and literally no vegetables (not to mention soy) other than red cabbage : )
  11. Thanks yes I am aware of the literature on IGF-1, an interesting dynamic here is fasting; I regularly fast (20/4) and eat basically three small meals between 2-6pm. I do this for hormesis and generally have become leaner and started to look younger over the last 1.5 years of doing this. Does fasting spike growth hormone? If so, how does this counteract the benefits it produces to mitochondria?
  12. First, watermelon historically has been a highly seasonal fruit (as many others); it serves a very good purpose as it has among the highest potassium content of any food. In the hot summer months, people sweat more, and it is almost by nature that watermelon is packed w/ so much potassium and fluid. Second, watermelon boosts nitric oxide in the blood extremely well, which is why some bodybuilders eat it before going to the gym. In conjunction, I think that daily consumption would not be smart, but it can surely be a part of a CR eating regimen, watermlon is very low cal, packed w/ nutrients, and naturally cleans out our arteries.
  13. Thanks for the interesting video...there is much to doubt, however, as the studies they draw on don't control for whether meat consumers ate processed/junk food... I mean that is most of the equation at play.
  14. alexthegra8

    Appropriate kcal-dense foods

    I'm a big fan of buckwheat, it is low GI, and has way more magnesium than the average grain (if you want to call it that)... it also is very cheap and easy to cook.
  15. alexthegra8

    Appropriate kcal-dense foods

    More reason to eat 1-2 brazil nuts a day forever...
  16. alexthegra8

    Should we all be drinking wine?

    Empirically, some of the longest living populations on earth consume decent amounts of alcohol (mostly red wine), in moderation. I think there is something to be said about moderate consumption combined with social interactions; if one worries about dying or extending life to the extent that they won't even have a drink (excluding addictive persons, alcoholics), then the problem may be in their worries. Most commonly consuming alcohol is done socially, and the longest living persons on earth tend to benefit from social interactions (rotary clubs, civic associations, etc) late into their life.
  17. alexthegra8

    Appropriate kcal-dense foods

    Thanks for the helpful info. I think any study that looks at selenium in the context of CVD might be a troublesome, there are so many other things that impact CVD ( so many that I don't think it would even be possible to control for all these factors). As such, the most interesting thing about selenium, in my opinion, is that it strongly correlated with longevity in the context of brain health -- research needs to be carried out to determine if the maximum daily allowance is correlated with brain function and protective against some of the heinous brain conditions we humans tend to develop with old age, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, etc.
  18. alexthegra8

    Appropriate kcal-dense foods

  19. alexthegra8

    Appropriate kcal-dense foods

    The brain is susceptible to oxidative stress due to low level of antioxidants, high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids and increased oxygen demand [3]. Thus, neuroprotective properties of Se may comprise of antioxidative selenoproteins biosynthesis stimulation. Another mechanism of Se neuroprotection is attributed to its ability to modulate Ca2+ influx via ion channels [158-160] and anti-inflammatory effect [72, 161], e.g. abrogation of microglia invasion [162]. In general, inflammation plays an important role in neurodegeneration
  20. alexthegra8

    Appropriate kcal-dense foods

    What are the pros and cons here? Importance of selenium and selenoprotein for brain function: From antioxidant protection to neuronal signalling Abstract Multiple biological functions of selenium manifest themselves mainly via 25 selenoproteins that have selenocysteine at their active centre. Selenium is vital for the brain and seems to participate in the pathology of disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and epilepsy. Since selenium was shown to be involved in diverse functions of the central nervous system, such as motor performance, coordination, memory and cognition, a possible role of selenium and selenoproteins in brain signalling pathways may be assumed. The aim of the present review is to analyse possible relations between selenium and neurotransmission. Selenoproteins seem to be of special importance in the development and functioning of GABAergic (GABA, γ-aminobutyric acid) parvalbumin positive interneurons of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Dopamine pathway might be also selenium dependent as selenium shows neuroprotection in the nigrostriatal pathway and also exerts toxicity towards dopaminergic neurons under higher concentrations. Recent findings also point to acetylcholine neurotransmission involvement. The role of selenium and selenoproteins in neurotransmission might not only be limited to their antioxidant properties but also to inflammation, influencing protein phosphorylation and ion channels, alteration of calcium homeostasis and brain cholesterol metabolism. Moreover, a direct signalling function was proposed for selenoprotein P through interaction with post-synaptic apoliprotein E receptors 2 (ApoER2). Importance of selenium and selenoprotein for brain function: From antioxidant protection to neuronal signalling - PubMed (nih.gov)
  21. alexthegra8

    PROSTATE CANCER PREVENTION

    Moderating IGF-1 (by various means) Moderating mTOR (by various means) Moderating insulin (by various means) I think this is incredibly unpractical, being a keto vegan would probably be the worst way to live one's life and not enjoy literally any kind of decent food. Insulin gets spiked when we eat fruit, potatoes, rice, pasta, grains, etc., not to mention no cheese or even fish (which raise igf-1). While scientifically plausible, these recommendations, in my opinion, are not observable in any population of the world, including those from "blue zones" Sardinia, Okinawa, etc.
  22. Speaking of NYC sewage, does anyone remember the movie Mimic? it was a 90s horror movie about cocoon based monsters that lived under the subway : )
  23. alexthegra8

    Appropriate kcal-dense foods

    Huberman's quite popular podcast frequently mentions selenium as being key to brain health and long term cognition. As with everything, there are pros and cons...
  24. alexthegra8

    Are we exercising too much!

    If your joints hurt, do low impact aerobic exercise like cycling and best of all, swimming.
  25. Next flu season a new variant will arise that will be even less lethal than omicron and more contagious. COVID will never go away and will be apart of the common cold in decades ahead.
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