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Found 2 results

  1. mccoy

    Blue zones: right or wrong?

    All of you guys know well the blue zones concept, as later made public by Dave Buettner. The more I think about it, the more it seems that the real common, governing factor is genetic variations, not diet and lifestyle (although the latter sure contribute). The okinawans followed an unbalanced diet, pooro in protein, poor in micronutrients, too high in carbohydrates. The Sardinian shepherds from Ogliastra followed an hypercaloric, hyperproteic, hyperglycemic diet, with lots of saturated fats from dairy products. No fish at all. The Costaricans from Nicoya, an hyperglycemic diet similar to the Sardinians, with little fish, with eggs and meat, more legumes and fruit than the Sardinians The Greeks from Ikaria: I don't have a scientific input, mainly a generic Mediterranean diet with a little fish, dairy products, meat. The adventists: contrary to the above, they are presently living into a fast-paced society. They follow different diets, with various degrees of adherence to a vegan plan. I've not found clear statistics of how longer the above populations lived, the info is more qualitative and is restricted to the older individuals who started practicing a traditional diet but who, in many cases, adopted a transitional (less traditional) diet later on. So we don't know if it is better in later years to change diet. The adventists have been studied as far as death and various hazard ratios go, with mixed results (the pescovegan diet of Adventists) but I don't know about longevity. My bottom line: maybe the importance of diet and lifestyle in the blue ones is overblown. Many diets have not the characteristics which we would associate to significantly enhanced longevity. The more I delve into the issue, the more it seems that genetic variants make up maybe 90% of the reasons why such populations are more longeve. Exception done for the adventists, for whom we don't have clear longevity statistics, AFAIK.
  2. mccoy

    'Blue zones' diets

    I just made a double search: by the forum engine and by the google engine. There appears to be no thread specifically on the blue zones in this forum so I'm going to open one. I've just read the chapter on the blue zones diets in Dan Buettner's book: He lists 5 verified (where birth certificate confirm exceptional longevity) blue zones as you guys well know: Ikaria island, greece Okinawa island, japan Sardinia island, Italy Loma Prieta adventists, ca., USA Nicoya peninsula, Costa Rica
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