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Found 10 results

  1. Many of us here are fairly robotic, and eat the same thing day in and day out. Some of us enjoy more diversity and enjoy exploring culinary aspects of foods. Yet for many people browsing this forum, they aren't exactly sure what our meals looks like. Let us share our wonderful food creations with one another! I just enjoyed a delicious lunch. It consisted of the following: Purple sweet potato, chick peas, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, mushrooms, 1 tsp of olive oil, 1 tbsp of 20-spice mix, garlic, oregano, parsley, cilantro, chili peppers, and 2 oranges for dessert. Ingredients were organic when possible. I also get centenarian status for eating Okinawan sweet potato, right? Calorie total was about 700-800, but I don't watch that closely. I just eat more or less depending on what the scale says each day. Did I mention the food was incredibly delicious? Bon appetit!
  2. Hi CR Society Friends! For my first post here, I'd like to ask our community if anyone has come across published research similar to that which is currently being discussed in the "Fasting for CR Benefits?" topic in this forum. That topic, which I highly recommend, is discussing the University of Wisconsin-Madison study on fasting driving the positive effects of a CR diet in mice. So as to not sidetrack that topic, anyone familiar with studies that, for example, have compared time restricted feeding (TRF) windows (16:8 versus 18:6?), particularly in relation to CR, is more than welcome to discuss them here. One study (Sutton et al., 2018) randomized men with prediabetes into an early TRF (6 hour feeding period, with dinner before 3 p.m.) or a control schedule (12 hour feeding period) and later crossed the groups over to the other schedule. The early TRF significantly improved some aspects of cardiometabolic health (even without any weight loss). My criticism of that study is that there were two (potentially confounding) variables (early versus later eating as well as a 6 versus 12 hour feeding window) that differed in the experimental and control groups. The study begs for a follow-up (which I haven't found) comparing only early versus late TRF. Nonetheless, the results are noteworthy. I'd very much appreciate reading anyone's thoughts or knowledge on such topics. Thanks!
  3. Dear ALL, I've just received the letter below, from Dr. Luigi Fontana. It describes his latest book, and includes an attached video. Enjoy, -- Saul Dear Saul, how are you? Hope you are doing well in these difficult times. I am writing to bring to your kind attention a new book, entitled the ‘Path to Longevity’, that summarizes more than 20 years of research, clinical practice and my accumulated knowledge on healthy longevity. Here, a video interview with Sunrise TV that encapsulates some of the key topics: https://youtu.be/bho1IfJqCBw My ultimate dream is that by reading this book people might start to examine their current level of physical and psychological health, and their subconscious expectations for the future. I hope that by becoming more aware of their full potential they will unlock a profoundly felt need for transformation and possibly help the world become a better place. Warmest regards, Luigi PROFESSOR LUIGI FONTANA, MD, PhD, FRACP Professor of Medicine and Nutrition Leonard P Ullmann Chair in Translational Metabolic Health Director, Healthy Longevity Research and Clinical Program Charles Perkins Centre | Sydney Medical School (Central Clinical School) Faculty of Medicine and Health The University of Sydney
  4. Health in old age is a lifelong affair Reduced food intake in old mice can no longer improve health https://www.mpg.de/14021239/1017-balt-110438-health-in-old-age-is-a-lifelong-affair
  5. drewab

    CR: My Story

    Hi All, I've hung out on these forums for a little while now. Long enough that I'm pretty sure I have begun to understand some of its finer content - and important things like why Dean gives Michael a hard time. I'd like to share a little about my story. At 24 years old I was being monitored for cardiovascular problems. My family physician had detected a heart murmur on my annual checkup and I was showing some really strange blood pressure readings (regularly ~155/45). An echocardiogram revealed that I had a bicuspid aortic valve that was leaking quite significantly. This lead to the replacement of my aortic valve via open-heart surgery at 24. Unfortunately post-op I developed acute endocarditis, which become chronic endocarditis. I lived the next 27 months of my life in and out of hospitals visiting IV clinics for antibiotics 3x daily to find this heart infection. I had PICC lines installed, and was administered just about every kind of high-potency anti-biotic you can imagine, and for 27 months straight. I was hospitalized a total of 5 times and was probably close to death at a few points. Closer than I'd like to believe. Needless to say, antibiotics weren't working. So I required open heart surgery for a second time. I was 26 years olds at this point. Trans-esophegeal echocardiograms confirmed a large vegetation on my aortic valve and aorta. This is basically a mass of bacteria, platelets, white blood cells, etc. I had my aortic valve replaced again, along with my aorta. Additionally, arteries were reattached in different locations, so that future heart surgery doesn't have to be invasive - the current gear in my heart is believed to last 10-20 years - hopefully. I've talked to Dr. Essylstyn twice on the phone and he feels next time I need surgery, it will be done through trans-aortic valve implantation. He also said 'no one makes a habit out of sternotomies, they suck.' He's right. They are awful. The second surgery went well. And here is something that Dean and his ethical vegan spirit will like. I was profoundly impacted by this experience for many reasons. One of which was the fact that a cow had to die for me to live. Bovine tissue is used to construct the valve replaced in my heart. When I woke up from the second surgery and had no desire to consume animals ever again. I never had a bite of meat again. I almost immediately went vegan despite having never read a thing about it. (Technically speaking I've consumed animal products maybe once-twice a year when in a pinch, but that's really not significant to the story) I went to my local bookstore and picked up one of the first health books I saw. Which happened to be the Blue Zones. I often wonder what would have happened if I randomly grabbed an Atkins or paleo book. I thank whatever higher power is out there that it was the Blue Zones. That quickly lead to the assimilation of the China Study, Finding Ultra, Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease, The Spectrum, The CR Way, and so on. Pre-heart surgery I was just under 220 pounds, somewhat muscular too and consuming about 400g of protein per day - that is not a typo. After the second procedure I was about 185 pounds. This morning I was 149 pounds. 5.5 years after starting a WFPB vegan, lightly CR'd diet. (See photo attached from today - BMI is 20.7). You can also tell I don't have the perfect CR body, but it's been through a lot. I have a little loose skin, some big scars, and some mild man boobs. But whatever. I'm alive, happy, and contributing a lot to this world each day. In discussion of how I got the bicuspid valve in the first place, my cardiologist has 3 possible explanations: a) I was born with it b) I was hospitalized as an infant with a fever of unknown origin, which may have rheumatic fever c) I was hospitalized as an infant with a fever of unknown origin, which may have endocarditis. Though I will never know for sure, and I suppose there is the possibility it was something else. Here is the amazing thing. I had developed an enlarged heart since it was working so hard to re-pump blood that was flowing backwards through my valve. My heart returned to normal size, something my cardiologist said does not happen. Maybe the surgery was a great success, maybe it was the CR lifestyle, or some combination of the two. I personally think that if I returned to my old ways, my heart would not have shrunk down. The other biomarkers of mine are great. Fasting glucose is 79. BP is 110/60. Total cholesterol is 129. Triglycerides are 29. And so on. Interestingly, the one I have that doesn't add up to CR levels is IGF-1. Which came back at about 280 when I had it tested about a year ago. Anyway - I just had a nice breakfast of wild rice, barley, mango, raisins, flax, cocoa, almond butter, and about 5 oz of arugula. It's awfully cold outside, so it's time to go for a brisk walk in a tank-top and shorts to get some CE with my dog. Thanks for listening folks!
  6. Dear ALL, Today is my 80th birthday. I continue to be in excellent health. Several factors that I think are important for prolonged healthspan and (possibly) lifespan: I've been practicing CR since April, 1996 (so about 23 years). I do vigorous aerobic exercise for half an hour or longer six days a week at my gym (in my case, on the latest Precor elliptical cross trainer with hand motion, at the maximum resistance and a fast speed). I continue to be fully employed at the University of Rochester as a Professor of Mathematics (a position that I've held since 1974): I'm the oldest member of the Math Department. I teach two courses every term (both in the Fall and Spring -- I'm off for the Summers). I enjoy the teaching, and attending seminars and colloquia. Here is a recent health assessment from my Endocrinologist: (Note: The weight is incorrect -- weight was taken after I'd eaten a huge breakfast of 1 pound of raw Nappa cabbage, and 64 ounces of carefully brewed Chinese white tea -- that's always my breakfast): Wittlin, Steven D, MD at 5/7/2019 10:00 AM Status: Signed HPI: Saul Lubkin is a 79 y.o. male who presents for follow up of Osteoporosis. He now takes Forteo. . He denies any pain , fractures, muscle weakness or kidney stones. He continues on low calorie diet. Patient's medications, allergies, past medical, surgical, social and family histories were reviewed and updated as appropriate. ROS: CONSTITUTIONAL: Appetite good, no fevers, night sweats or weight loss HEENT: No double or blurry vision; denies severe headache CV: No chest pain, shortness of breath or peripheral edema RESPIRATORY: No cough, wheezing or dyspnea NEURO: No MS changes, no motor weakness, no sensory changes ENDO: No polyuria or polydipsia PE: BP 110/60 | Pulse 71 | Ht 1.55 m (5' 1.02") | Wt 61.2 kg (135 lb) | BMI 25.49 kg/m² GENERAL APPEARANCE: well developed, well nourished, no acute distress; aware and alert HEENT: PERLA, EOMI, no lid lag, pink conjunctiva ; no proptosis NECK: supple, no thyromegaly, no lymphadenopathy HEART: RRR, normal S1, S2 CHEST: lungs clear to auscultation bilaterally, no spinal tenderness EXTREMITIES: no clubbing, cyanosis, or edema. Pedal pulses 2+ bilaterally. Both feet clean without deformity, callous, ulceration, or fungal infection. NEUROLOGICAL: Alert and oriented x 3. Normal DTRs SKIN: Orange color. ASSESSMENT/PLAN: Forteo. Mr Lubkin will repeat his DXA . He continues to appear hypercarotenemic. Saul and I had a long discussion. As per usual he is on top of recent research in osteoporosis. He wants Forteo, acknowledging that we have no good data on its use for this long, that convention is that he should be using A bisphosphonate, and that he has had a very small decrease in BMD.. RTC one year with DXA
  7. CRON is well known to greatly reduce inflammation. For years, I've been measuring CRP and TNF_alpha, which are supposed to be measurements of inflammation. All but once, I've gotten CRP <5, meaning immeasurably low. All but the last two measurements (in 2016 and 2017) were vanishingly small for TNF_alpha as well -- but the last two measurements were surprisingly high. So a major contradiction between CRP (vanishingly small) and TNF_alpha (high) on these last two measurements. Weird. I asked my CR friendly nephrologist. He didn't know; suggested that I check with some of the CRONNies -- I guess he thinks it possible that it might be one of the weird looking numbers that happen with CR. So I'm following his advice. Anybody -- who is knowledgeable in the mechanisms of these proteins -- have any ideas? -- Saul
  8. Hi ALL! I thought I'd share two experiences with you, both of which happened in very different places. On returning to teach my two courses at the University of Rochester, Dept of Mathematics after several Jewish Holidays, a much younger (healthy and overweight) female colleague and friend of mine, who is a differential geometer, said "I hear you're on a special diet". I responded, "That's true." She then hoped to get some information about it. I responded positively -- it won't be easy, but I might try to explain CRON to her -- that's quite complicated, since we all have such different diets. Then, about two days later, while changing into gym clothes in my gym, I was approached by an extremely old person, who looked like a near-death alcoholic, who I didn't recognize; he said "I hear you're on a special diet". Apparently (he seemed to claim) we're about the same age, and he knew me from before. I mentioned "Calorie Restriction". He said "that must be hard to do". I gave him the URL "crsociety.org". I doubt that he'll do anything. I'm 79, exercise vigorously for 1/2 - 1 hr. most days, and continue to be optimistic and cheerful, and enjoy my work at the UR Math Dept. I'm the oldest member of the UR Math Dept, and in excellent shape. I'm an example of how CR, ON and EX helps one to maintain vitality. I was especially impressed that in two hugely different venues, I was asked the same question; I thought I woiuld share with you. -- Saul
  9. Valter Longo's work has been discussed around here quite frequently as of late, particularly his work on the fasting mimicking diet. In typical Rich Roll fashion, he goes long form and tries to gain deep insight into Longo's understanding of nutrition, longevity, and health. Rich says that he considers it one of his most important conversations to date.
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