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Found 4 results

  1. Todd Allen

    What's Wrong with Eggs Now?!

    [Admin Note: Over on the LDL particle size thread, Todd asked the question of why eggs are bad. Seems like a question that deserves its own thread, given the recent supposed exoneration of dietary cholesterol. So here it is.] The important difference between consumption of dietary cholesterol, which has a negligible influence on heart disease risk, and cholesterol produced endogenously in the body (which can be a marker of risk, depending on a complete profile).... So why exactly is it that eggs are so damn bad? http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=92
  2. All, As I've elaborated on elsewhere, I'm rather obsessive about dental hygiene. This is in part because I want to avoid cavities, but also out of a vague awareness of studies linking teeth & gum problems with heart attack risk, likely mediated by systemic inflammation induced by chronic oral infections. So I was happy to see my recall of the linkage between poor dental health and cardiovascular disease supported by this new study [2], as well as this review [1] of many previous studies, both of which were shared by Al Pater (thanks Al!). From the review [1]: [N]ew onset as well as prevalent periodontitis is associated with increased coronary heart disease risk,7 and there is a graded association between tooth loss and stroke, cardiovascular death, and all-cause mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease.8 From the case-control study [2]: There was an increased risk for [heart attack] among those with [periodontal disease] (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.21-1.83), which remained significant (OR =1.28; 95% CI 1.03-1.60) after adjusting for variables that differed between patients and controls (smoking habits, diabetes, years of education and marital status). So we should all be taking good care of our teeth and gums if we want to avoid cardiovascular disease. --Dean ----------------- [1] Circulation. 2016 Jan 13. pii: CIRCULATIONAHA.115.020869. [Epub ahead of print] Increasing Evidence for an Association Between Periodontitis and Cardiovascular Disease. Stewart R, West M. http://circ.ahajournals.org.sci-hub.io/content/early/2016/01/13/CIRCULATIONAHA.115.020869.abstract Abstract Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by bacterial colonisation, which results in destruction of the tissues between the tooth surface and gingiva, loss of connective tissue attachment, erosion of alveolar bone and tooth loss.1 Periodontitis is common and increases with age. In a US survey about half of adults aged over 30 years have some periodontitis and almost 10% have severe disease.2 Evidence for an association between periodontitis and atherosclerotic vascular disease, including stroke, myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary heart disease and cardiovascular death, comes from more than 50 prospective cohort and case control studies undertaken during the last 25 years.3-6 More recent analyses from large cohort studies suggest new onset as well as prevalent periodontitis is associated with increased coronary heart disease risk,7 and there is a graded association between tooth loss and stroke, cardiovascular death, and all-cause mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease.8 If causal, these associations would be of great importance because of the potential that preventing or treating periodontal disease could reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events. KEYWORDS: Editorial; cardiovascular disease risk factors; periodontitis; teeth PMID: 26762522 --------------- [2] Circulation. 2016 Jan 13. pii: CIRCULATIONAHA.115.020324. [Epub ahead of print] Periodontitis Increases the Risk of a First Myocardial Infarction: A Report From the PAROKRANK Study. Rydén L, Buhlin K, Ekstrand E, de Faire U, Gustafsson A, Holmer J, Kjellström B, Lindahl B, Norhammar A, Nygren Å, Näsman P, Rathnayake N, Svenungsson E, Klinge B. Abstract BACKGROUND: -The relationship between periodontitis (PD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is debated. PD is common in patients with CVD. It has been postulated that PD could be causally related to the risk for CVD, a hypothesis tested in PAROKRANK. METHODS AND RESULTS: -805 patients (age <75 years) with a first MI and 805 age (mean 62±8), gender (male 81%) and area matched controls without MI underwent standardized dental examination including panoramic x-ray. The periodontal status was defined as healthy (=/>80% remaining bone) or as mild-moderate (79-66%) or severe PD (<66%). Great efforts were made to collect information on possibly related confounders (~100 variables). Statistical comparisons included Student's pair-wise t-test and Mc Nemar's test in 2x2 contingency tables. Contingency tables exceeding 2x2 with ranked alternatives were tested by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Odds Ratios (95% CI) were calculated by conditional logistic regression. PD was more common (43%) in patients than in controls (33%; p<0.001). There was an increased risk for MI among those with PD (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.21-1.83), which remained significant (OR =1.28; 95% CI 1.03-1.60) after adjusting for variables that differed between patients and controls (smoking habits, diabetes, years of education and marital status). CONCLUSIONS: -In this large case-control study of PD, verified by radiographic bone loss and with a careful consideration of potential confounders, the risk of a first MI was significantly increased in patients with PD even after adjustment for confounding factors. These findings strengthen the possibility of an independent relationship between PD and MI. KEYWORDS: cardiovascular disease risk factors; myocardial infarction; panoramic dental radiography (OPG); periodontitis PMID: 26762521
  3. All, Sthira, in a recent post to the exercise thread ,which I wantonly edited (my bad, sorry Sthira...) in order to create this new thread on animal cruelty, mentioned how beneficial dance is for health & longevity, complementing my daughter, who is a dancer. In vindication Sthira's assessment, this new study [1] (press release, popular press article) found that engaging in social dancing, particularly rigorous social dancing (enough to make one "out of breath and sweaty"), reduced cardiovascular mortality risk by 50% relative to people who didn't dance. Dancing was about twice as beneficial for CVD mortality as walking, even after controlling for a pretty extensive set of potential confounders, including age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking, alcohol, BMI, chronic illness, psychosocial distress, and total physical activity amount. Discussing the study, one of the authors said: "We should not underestimate the playful social interaction aspects of dancing which, when coupled with some more intense movement, can be a very powerful stress relief and heart health promoting pastime... The Bee Gees said it best - you should be dancing," Maybe we should have a dance party one evening at the CR Conference.☺ --Dean ---------- [1] American Journal of Preventive Medicine Available online 1 March 2016, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2016.01.004 Dancing Participation and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: A Pooled Analysis of 11 Population-Based British Cohorts Dafna Merom, PhD, Ding Ding, PhD, Emmanuel Stamatakis, PhD Free full text: http://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(16)00030-1/pdf Abstract Introduction Little is known about whether cardiovascular benefits vary by activity type. Dance is a multidimensional physical activity of psychosocial nature. The study aimed to examine the association between dancing and cardiovascular disease mortality. Methods A cohort study pooled 11 independent population surveys in the United Kingdom from 1995 to 2007, analyzed in 2014. Participants were 48,390 adults aged ≥40 years who were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline and consented to be linked to the National Death Registry. Respondents reported participation in light- or moderate-intensity dancing and walking in the past 4 weeks. Physical activity amount was calculated based on frequency, duration, and intensity of participation in various types of exercise. The main outcome was cardiovascular disease mortality based on ICD-9 codes 390−459 or ICD-10 codes I01−I99. Results During 444,045 person-years, 1,714 deaths caused by cardiovascular disease were documented. Moderate-intensity, but not light-intensity, dancing and walking were both inversely associated with cardiovascular disease mortality. In Cox regression models, the hazard ratios for cardiovascular disease mortality, adjusted for age, sex, SES, smoking, alcohol, BMI, chronic illness, psychosocial distress, and total physical activity amount, were 0.54 (95% CI=0.34, 0.87) for moderate-intensity dancing and 0.75 (95% CI=0.62, 0.90) for moderate-intensity walking. Conclusions Moderate-intensity dancing was associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease mortality to a greater extent than walking. The association between dance and cardiovascular disease mortality may be explained by high-intensity bouts during dancing, lifelong adherence, or psychosocial benefits.
  4. Dean Pomerleau

    Total Cholesterol and Heart Attacks

    [Another one for the "non-CR diet and health" forum. If such a forum ever gets created, I promise I'll use my moderator super-powers to move all these threads to the new forum!] Dr. Greger's latest video titled Everything in Moderation? Even Heart Disease? has this interesting graph from [1] of cardiovascular disease and heart attacks as a function of total serum cholesterol level (click to enlarge): It shows that 35 percent of heart attacks occur in people with total serum cholesterol between 150 and 200 mg/dL. I had no idea it was that high. And virtually no heart attacks occur in people with cholesterol below 150 mg/dL, which is why many people (including me) have said it makes you virtually "heart attack proof". But then I started thinking, wait a minute. Couldn't this simply be a reflection of population statistics, and not reflect a causal relationship between cholesterol level and heart attacks? To understand this possibility, consider a similar plot of height vs. # of heart attacks. Assuming heart attacks are totally independent of height, you'd still see a similar bell curve of the number of heart attacks plotted against height, for the simple reason that height is distributed along a bell curve. So 50% of heart attacks would occur in men below the median height of 5'10" in the US, and furthermore only a tiny fraction of heart attacks (~3%) would occur in men shorter than 5'2", which is two standard deviations below the median. Does that mean that having a very short stature makes you heart attack proof? Of course not, it just means that there aren't many men shorter than 5'2" to contribute to the heart attack statistics. As an admirer of both Dr. Greger's work, I am sometimes disappointed when he uses potentially misleading statistics like this one to advance his perspective on diet and health (i.e. the value of following a plant-based diet - which I very much agree with). So what is the more accurate picture of the relationship between cholesterol and heart attack risk? Here is a graph, from [2], which BTW has a very good overview of various blood markers, including cholesterol sub-components and their association with CHD: As you can see from the graph on the right, CHD mortality rate (as opposed to total # of heart attacks) appears to be pretty asymptotic below 200 mg/dL. It's only when you get up to a total cholesterol of about 225 mg/dL that you see CHD mortality rate rising significantly, above which it goes through the roof. This is what's called evidence-based medicine, and it is why the American Heart Association and European equivalent (the European Societies for Cardiology, Hypertension and Diabetes) recommend keeping total cholesterol below 190-200, rather than necessarily trying to push it below 150 using diet or statins. With the latter, you might end up like this guy : So despite what Dr. Greger suggests, keeping one's total cholesterol below 150 mg/dL, as opposed to somewhere in the range of 150-200 mg/dL, doesn't appear to provide a dramatic benefit in terms of heart attack risk. To be fair, Dr. Greger has another video on the optimal cholesterol level for heart health that does seem to get the science better. It ignores total cholesterol level, and instead looks at all the randomized control trials of cholesterol lowering drugs, which suggest that an LDL level below 70 mg/dL (about 1/2 the average LDL level in US adults, 130 mg/dL) does make one virtually "heart attack proof". But then again, the relevance of results from people who are taking statins, not to mention the relevance for us of statin-induced LDL reduction or other positive effects of statins, make it far from certain that these results apply to people keeping LDL cholesterol low through diet and lifestyle choices. --Dean --------------- [1] Atherosclerosis. 1996 Jul;124 Suppl:S1-9. Lipids, risk factors and ischaemic heart disease. Castelli WP(1). Author information: (1)Framingham Cardiovascular Institute, MA 01701-9167, USA. Over 200 risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) have now been identified. Among these, the three most important are (1) abnormal lipids, including the fact that there are more than 15 types of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins and four different types of triglyceride-rich particles, some of which are very atherogenic, (2) high blood pressure, and (3) cigarette smoking. In addition, many other factors including diabetes, haemostatic factors such as fibrinogen, factor VII, plasminogen activator inhibitors, and new factors such as apolipoprotein E4 and homocysteine, are known to increase the risk of developing clinical CVD. A low risk for CVD requires that these various factors are present in the circulation in the correct proportions. Two simple tests for determining plasma lipid levels can be used to identify those individuals with an atherogenic lipid profile and who are, therefore, at increased risk for CVD. Firstly, the ratio of total cholesterol to high density cholesterol (HDL cholesterol) should be determined, followed by measurement of plasma triglyceride concentrations. This will allow differentiation of whether the low density lipoproteins (LDL), HDL cholesterol or triglyceride-rich particles such as the small dense beta-very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) are the major cause for concern. Once identified, those individuals with a high lipid risk profile should be treated before, rather than after, experiencing coronary heart disease (CHD). PMID: 8831910 ------------------- [2] The Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Vol 13:2 (2003) THE ROLE OF LIPIDS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS AND CORONARY HEART DISEASE: GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT Victor Blaton Department of Clinical Chemistry, Hospital AZ Sint-Jan AV, Brugge, Belgium pdf: http://www.ifcc.org/ifccfiles/docs/140206200306.pdf
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