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  1. Dean Pomerleau

    The Waiter’s Weight Matters...

    All I can say is that people are zombies when it comes to food choices... From [1]: Diners ordered significantly more items when served by heavy wait staff with high body mass indexes (BMI; p < .001) compared with wait staff with low body mass indexes. Specifically, they were four times as likely to order desserts (p < .01),... In this popular press article on the study, the author says: “A fun, happy, heavy waiter, might lead a diner to say ‘What the heck’ and to cut loose a little.” --Dean ------------- [1] The Waiter’s Weight - Does a Server’s BMI Relate to How Much Food Diners Order? Tim Döring1 Brian Wansink2⇑ 1Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany 2Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA Brian Wansink, Cornell University, 475 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801, USA. Email: fblsubmissions@cornell.edu http://eab.sagepub.com/content/early/2015/10/29/0013916515621108.abstract Abstract Does the weight of a server have an influence on how much food diners order in the high-involvement environment of a restaurant? If people are paying for a full meal, this has implications for consumers, restaurants, and public health. To investigate this, 497 interactions between diners and servers were observed in 60 different full-service restaurants. Diners ordered significantly more items when served by heavy wait staff with high body mass indexes (BMI; p < .001) compared with wait staff with low body mass indexes. Specifically, they were four times as likely to order desserts (p < .01), and they ordered 17.65% more alcoholic drinks (p < .01). These findings provide valuable evidence in recent lawsuits against weight discrimination, and it suggests to consumers who decide what they will and will not order at a restaurant—such as a salad appetizer, no dessert, and one drink—than to decide when the waiter arrives.
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