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  1. All, Here is an interesting new study [1] (popular press story) that I appreciated as much for its data as its conclusions. In it, researchers identified a group of ~1400 "Wellderly" individuals - which they defined as: ndividuals who are >80 years old with no chronic diseases and who are not taking chronic medications. As you might imagine, these folks are pretty rare, and so they wanted to compare their genomes with those of an average population of elderly people. But first, they did an interesting thing - they compared the longevity of the siblings of the Wellderly cohort (who share a lot of genetics, and probably some lifestyle factors too, with the Wellderly folks) to see how their lifespan compares with the average US population. Here are the "survival curves" for the Wellderly siblings (red) vs. average folks (blue): As you can see, the Wellderly siblings had a more square mortality curve, but their survival curve wasn't shifted right - i.e. their "maximum lifespan" wasn't any longer than the average folks. Instead, both curves hit (near) zero around 100 years. Like the Wellderly themselves, their siblings appear to avoid / postpone the diseases of aging, and so do better in the "middle years" of elderliness (65-85), but beyond that have a mortality rate similar to the population as a whole. They then looked at the Wellderly folks' genetics. Interestingly, they didn't find their genomes to be particularly enriched with so-called "longevity genes" - those that have been identified as more common in centenarians or other very long-lived people. In other words, these folks are healthy agers, but don't seem to be blessed with genes for extreme longevity, which I thought was interesting. It suggests that at least to some degree healthy aging and extreme longevity are distinct, based both on the (sibling) survival curve data and their own genetics. Here is how the authors summarized this part of their findings: [O]ur results suggest that healthy aging is a genetically overlapping but divergent phenotype from exceptional longevity and that the healthy aging phenotype is potentially enriched for heritable components of both reduced risk of age-associated disease and resistance to age-associated disease. I'm curious what Michael would say, but it seems like this apparent distinction between disease avoidance and extreme longevity might undermine to some degree the SENS hypothesis - that aging simple is the accumulation of damage from the diseases of aging. Note: that is my potentially inaccurate summary of the SENS hypothesis... But what I found personally most interesting and helpful from this paper were two of their tables, listing the various genetic markers they tested for both longevity and Alzheimer's disease (AD). They quite explicitly listed the SNPs and which alleles of those SNPs are associated with longevity or AD. I've reproduced the two tables below, and added my own data, a friend's 23andMe data I have access to, and links to 23andMe so that any other 23andMe customers can check their own status for the corresponding SNPs. I've even added a tally at the bottom of each table with a genetic "score" - basically the number of "good" alleles one carries minus (in the case of the AD table) the number of "bad" alleles one carries. Although in the case of AD, it was the evil APOE4 allele that dominated - i.e. the biggest difference between the genes of the "Wellderly" folks and the average population was that the Wellderly were a lot less likely to carry APOE4 alleles. Anyway, here are the tables. First, the table with the SNPs and alleles previously identified (via other studies) to be associated with increased longevity. The "Longevity Allele" column shows that variant of the SNP that has been shown to be associated with increased longevity. The second column shows the gene the SNP is part of - as you can see many familiar names, including FOXO3, SIRT1, IL-6, IGF1, AKT (all of which I note have been associated with both CR and Cold Exposure in one way or another). The green letters show when I or "Person X" are carriers for the "good" longevity allele: Here are "live" links to the 23andMe page for each SNP so 23andMe customers can check their own results on these SNPs: https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs2802292 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs1935949 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs3758391 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs5882 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs1042522 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs1800795 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs2811712 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs34516635 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs2542052 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs3803304 Here is the same sort of table, but this time for SNPs and Alleles associated with Alzheimer's disease and/or cognitive decline. Note, the last SNP in the table is the dreaded APOE4. As you can see from the p-value column, the APOE4 allele was far and away the most significant predictor of AD/cognitive decline, and the Wellderly had it less frequently that the general population (the column labelled "ITMI A2 Freq"). Also not that unlike the longevity SNPs, 23andMe didn't have data for many of the AD-related SNPs. Once again, the green letters show when I or "Person X" are carriers for the "good" allele (for avoiding AD) or and red letters show where one of us is a carrier for the "bad" allele (increasing risk of AD): Here are the direct links to 23andMe for the subset of SNPs from the table that were available (at least for me): https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs190982 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs2718058 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs1476679 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs11771145 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs11218343 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs17125944 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs10498633 https://www.23andme.com/you/explorer/snp/?snp_name=rs2075650 As you can see, for both the longevity SNPs and the AD SNPs, my score is a bit better than the score for my friend, "Person X" - so I got that goin' for me. And they are an unfortunate carrier of one APOE4 allele. ☹ To wrap up, the researchers also also found that a few of the Wellderly folks were enriched with an ultra-rare variants of a gene that seems to be especially protective against AD, called COL25A1 but I couldn't figure out what SNPs or alleles they were talking about. As always, these genetic marker studies need to be taken with a grain of salt. But it was fun to see where I and "Person X" stand regarding all these variants. I'd be curious if anyone else would be willing to share their data, or at least their "scores". --Dean ------- [1] Cell (2016), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2016.03.022 Whole-Genome Sequencing of a Healthy Aging Cohort Galina A. Erikson5, Dale L. Bodian5, Manuel Rueda, Bhuvan Molparia, Erick R. Scott, Ashley A. Scott-Van Zeeland, Sarah E. Topol, Nathan E. Wineinger, John E. Niederhuber, Eric J. Topol6, Ali Torkamani6 Free full text: http://www.cell.com/cell/pdf/S0092-8674(16)30278-1.pdf Summary Studies of long-lived individuals have revealed few genetic mechanisms for protection against age-associated disease. Therefore, we pursued genome sequencing of a related phenotype—healthy aging—to understand the genetics of disease-free aging without medical intervention. In contrast with studies of exceptional longevity, usually focused on centenarians, healthy aging is not associated with known longevity variants, but is associated with reduced genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer and coronary artery disease. Additionally, healthy aging is not associated with a decreased rate of rare pathogenic variants, potentially indicating the presence of disease-resistance factors. In keeping with this possibility, we identify suggestive common and rare variant genetic associations implying that protection against cognitive decline is a genetic component of healthy aging. These findings, based on a relatively small cohort, require independent replication. Overall, our results suggest healthy aging is an overlapping but distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity that may be enriched with disease-protective genetic factors. PMID: Unavailable
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