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  1. Dear ALL, The following fascinating article appeared in a University of Rochester publication this morning: https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/5508/not-all-sleep-is-equal-when-it-comes-to-cleaning-the-brain.aspx It describes the cleansing of the brain of debris by cerebral spinal fluid during slow wave sleep, discovered previously at UR; and notes that, during surgery, especially on older adults, it's important to use the appropriate anaesthetics, ketamine and xylazine, so that the glymphatic system should work as it usually works during deep slow wave sleep, to clear the brain. (The wrong anaesthetics can allow plaques to accumulate. Clinical examples are given. An obvious observation, not mentioned in the article (for obvious reasons): Might it be conceivably eventually a method of helping people having difficulty achieving slow wave sleep, to be take (orally take or inject ?) these two anaesthetics in (who knows what ?) quantity before bed to achieve better quality sleep? (I don't recommend experimenting with this on yourselves; but it would be fascinating if some qualified sleep researcher managed to start a clinical study of this possible method of improving sleep quality on patients at risk of Alzheimers. Probably would be VERY hard to get FDA approval). -- Saul
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