Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'benefits'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Forums
    • CR Science & Theory
    • CR Practice
    • Chitchat
    • General Health and Longevity
    • CR Recipes
    • Members-Only Area
  • Community

Blogs

  • Paul McGlothin's Blog
  • News
  • Calorie Restriction News Update

Categories

  • Supporting Members Only
  • Recipes
  • Research

Product Groups

  • CR IX
  • CRSI Membership
  • Conference DVDs

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL

Found 3 results

  1. Here is a 2 hr 33 min panel discussion with Dr. Essylstyn, Dr. Campbell, Dr. Williams, & Dr. Popper. No doubt this will be of interest to many people around here. It's incredible to get these brilliant people together!
  2. The Observer

    Motivation for Practicing CR?

    [Admin Note: Observer (the OP) and others - I apologize for moving this post around. After (nearly) completing a long response, I realize just how interesting Observer's questions are, and how they deserve their own thread in the CR Practice Forum. Thanks Observer! I'll be posting a detailed response shortly. - Dean] Great, now you guys somewhat discouraged me in throughout this thread. Just when I was getting a little bit more serious about starting a proper CR regime, after ~10 years of hesitation. But now you convinced me CR probably doesn't do much for us humans, compared to just eating/exercising healthy and staying slim. I am currently on some mild-CR plan with one 24-hour fast every week and my BMI is 21.5. Was planning on lowering it down do 19-20, but now I don't see a reason for doing it anymore. :( Before I believed I would gain at least 5-8 additional years, especially because of my own anecdotal evidence. I am somewhat a unique human specieman in that I was basically on CR for most of my life, unknowingly.. I simply rejected food, never liked sweets and was always semi-anorexic. As a result (I guess) I was developing slower as a child and always looked much younger than my peers. Even now in my late 30's people think I look 25-30 and I do agree my biological age must be closer to 30. Then again, what do I know? Now reading your posts Dean, you seem like a reasonable individual and you convinced me that we probably cannot gain more than ~2 years through CR and possibly even shorten our lifespan.. So the obvious question is, why do you - and others - even continue practicing it? Why not simply live healthy lives? I'm thinking perhaps I should only concentrate on fasting and autophagy that comes with it? What are your thoughts on that Dean, if you don't mind answering?
  3. All, The benefits of yoga has been discussed on various threads lately, so I figured it was time to consolidate the discussions into a single master thread, particularly since there is a new study I wanted to post (see below). First we saw in this thread that yoga beats both walking and a mediterranean diet for CVD risk reduction. Then we saw in this post by Cloud that 12 weeks of yoga reduces inflammatory markers in recovering cancer patients. Now, a new study [1] (popular press story) found that 12 weeks of yoga beat out the "gold standard" memory training technique in people with mild cognitive impairment. The yoga group had lower depression scores, and improved verbal and visuospatial memory compared with memory training. While the study was small, its effects were pretty impressive, and were accompanied by changes in brain region connectivity as measured by FMRI brain scans. With all this evidence of benefit, it seems like a good idea to start practicing yoga, and consider having the next CR Conference at a yoga center like Saul suggests - maybe Sthira and Saul can teach the rest of us! --Dean ---------- [1] J Alzheimers Dis. 2016 Apr 5;52(2):673-84. doi: 10.3233/JAD-150653. Changes in Neural Connectivity and Memory Following a Yoga Intervention for Older Adults: A Pilot Study. Eyre HA(1,)(2), Acevedo B(1), Yang H(1), Siddarth P(1), Van Dyk K(1), Ercoli L(1), Leaver AM(3), Cyr NS(1), Narr K(3), Baune BT(2), Khalsa DS(4), Lavretsky H(1). Author information: (1)Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA. (2)Discipline of Psychiatry, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. (3)Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center, Department of Neurology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA. (4)Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation, Tucson, AZ, USA. BACKGROUND: No study has explored the effect of yoga on cognitive decline and resting-state functional connectivity. OBJECTIVES: This study explored the relationship between performance on memory tests and resting-state functional connectivity before and after a yoga intervention versus active control for subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). METHODS: Participants ( ≥ 55 y) with MCI were randomized to receive a yoga intervention or active "gold-standard" control (i.e., memory enhancement training (MET)) for 12 weeks. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to map correlations between brain networks and memory performance changes over time. Default mode networks (DMN), language and superior parietal networks were chosen as networks of interest to analyze the association with changes in verbal and visuospatial memory performance. RESULTS: Fourteen yoga and 11 MET participants completed the study. The yoga group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in depression and visuospatial memory. We observed improved verbal memory performance correlated with increased connectivity between the DMN and frontal medial cortex, pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, right middle frontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and left lateral occipital cortex. Improved verbal memory performance positively correlated with increased connectivity between the language processing network and the left inferior frontal gyrus. Improved visuospatial memory performance correlated inversely with connectivity between the superior parietal network and the medial parietal cortex. CONCLUSION: Yoga may be as effective as MET in improving functional connectivity in relation to verbal memory performance. These findings should be confirmed in larger prospective studies. PMID: 27060939
×