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Found 2 results

  1. CRON is well known to greatly reduce inflammation. For years, I've been measuring CRP and TNF_alpha, which are supposed to be measurements of inflammation. All but once, I've gotten CRP <5, meaning immeasurably low. All but the last two measurements (in 2016 and 2017) were vanishingly small for TNF_alpha as well -- but the last two measurements were surprisingly high. So a major contradiction between CRP (vanishingly small) and TNF_alpha (high) on these last two measurements. Weird. I asked my CR friendly nephrologist. He didn't know; suggested that I check with some of the CRONNies -- I guess he thinks it possible that it might be one of the weird looking numbers that happen with CR. So I'm following his advice. Anybody -- who is knowledgeable in the mechanisms of these proteins -- have any ideas? -- Saul
  2. Charles Raison, M.D. is a professor at the School of Human Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Founding Director of the Center for Compassion Studies in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Arizona. Dr. Raison’s research focuses on inflammation and the development of depression in response to illness and stress. He also examines the physical and behavioral effects of compassion training on the brain, inflammatory processes, and behavior as well as the effect of heat stress as a potentially therapeutic intervention major depressive disorder.
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