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  1. Hi CR Society Friends! For my first post here, I'd like to ask our community if anyone has come across published research similar to that which is currently being discussed in the "Fasting for CR Benefits?" topic in this forum. That topic, which I highly recommend, is discussing the University of Wisconsin-Madison study on fasting driving the positive effects of a CR diet in mice. So as to not sidetrack that topic, anyone familiar with studies that, for example, have compared time restricted feeding (TRF) windows (16:8 versus 18:6?), particularly in relation to CR, is more than welcome to discuss them here. One study (Sutton et al., 2018) randomized men with prediabetes into an early TRF (6 hour feeding period, with dinner before 3 p.m.) or a control schedule (12 hour feeding period) and later crossed the groups over to the other schedule. The early TRF significantly improved some aspects of cardiometabolic health (even without any weight loss). My criticism of that study is that there were two (potentially confounding) variables (early versus later eating as well as a 6 versus 12 hour feeding window) that differed in the experimental and control groups. The study begs for a follow-up (which I haven't found) comparing only early versus late TRF. Nonetheless, the results are noteworthy. I'd very much appreciate reading anyone's thoughts or knowledge on such topics. Thanks!
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