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Guest Jazz

Looking to start CR - recommended software?

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Guest Jazz

Hello,

 

I am looking to start my CR adventure, just wondering what software options are available for tracking my nutrition? Are the free ones going to give me everything I need, and which ones are the better ones?

 

Thanks

Jazz

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I use the cronometer web site at www.cronometer.com. For the most part the free version is good. I used to use the java downloadable version which has better reporting and ability to copy and paste reports and foods from into email or other text files, but it's not being updated anymore with the latest food lists as far as I know.

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Guest DaveBtokyo

Jazz,

 

I also use CRON-O-METER, using the Android version on my smart phone is quite convenient, as long as I have a signal.

 

If you are looking for a guided membership approach to CR, you might also look into livingtheCRway, which promotes the commercial nutribase software. These programs all rely on the USDA databases, so it is a question of personal taste as to which entry and display suits you.

 

Dave

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Jazz,

 

I also use CRON-O-METER, using the Android version on my smart phone is quite convenient, as long as I have a signal.

 

If you are looking for a guided membership approach to CR, you might also look into livingtheCRway, which promotes the commercial nutribase software. These programs all rely on the USDA databases, so it is a question of personal taste as to which entry and display suits you.

 

Dave

 

Thank you for mentioning the NutriBase CR Way software, Dave. For someone who wants to dabble with CR and perhaps lose a few pounds, I think that CRON-O-Meter or Nutrition Data ( online only) make excellent choices. People can also still download the Dr. Roy Walford Interactive Diet Planner from the Society, which is OK to start with if you don’t care about having the current USDA database.

 

 

 

For more serious calorie restrictors the NutriBase 10 CR Way Edition software offerings deserve consideration.The software includes glucose tracking. The entries can be time stamped and graphed against carbohydrate intake and exercise. This function leads to invaluable insights for getting glucose under control. To find out more about the value of keeping glucose at low levels, use this link to the Society response to the NIA monkey study: http://www.crsociety.org/science/nia_monkey_study. Scroll to the center of the page and you will find this chart:

 

“AMP Activated Protein Kinase

Calorie Restriction Metabolism Coordinator”

 

 

AMP Kinase becomes active when calories and glucose levels are low, producing the extraordinary benefits shown in the chart.

 

 

 

If you have a weight management goal – whether it’s to lose, gain, or maintain weight –the software's "calories in, calories out" function is indispensable. Starting with total calorie intake and calorie expenditure for exercise and other daily activities, the software's charting function automatically graphs calories-burned data, so you can adjust your intake and exercise, accordingly.

 

 

 

The more advanced NutriBase 10 CR Way Longer Life Edition software took years to develop. Here we include organ optimization guides for the heart and kidneys. The idea is to protect these organs against age-related decline, by following a CR lifestyle that protects them and enhances their function.

 

 

 

For example, consider the kidney section. Two doctors worked with us to develop it. A telling feature is the correlation of ultrasound pictures of my kidneys and my dietary oxalate intake. This is an entirely new focus in my CR lifestyle. As it turns out, dietary oxalate can accumulate in the kidneys (and in other organs, like the heart) causing dangerous debris buildup that leads to kidney stones, reduction of glomerular filtration rate and plaque accumulation. Here is some more about that : Kidney Stone Prevention Program

 

 

 

 

 

It may be that calorie restrictors are more vulnerable to this than others because favorite foods like sweet potatoes, beets, leafy greens, and walnuts are very high in oxalates. Also healthy disposal of oxalate through urine requires ATP, which is appropriately low on CR folk.

 

 

 

Overall, I spent a couple of years researching this, which finally led to the addition of oxalate content data to the Longer Life edition. It also led to a kidney stone profile test that is user friendly. Besides being helpful to calorie restrictors, we hope it will be of interest to doctors for treatment of kidney stone patients. If it really takes off, we will use revenue from the proceeds to fund CR research.

 

 

 

Paul

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thank you for mentioning the NutriBase CR Way software, Dave. For someone who wants to dabble with CR and perhaps lose a few pounds, I think that CRON-O-Meter or Nutrition Data ( online only) make excellent choices. People can also still download the Dr. Roy Walford Interactive Diet Planner from the Society, which is OK to start with if you don’t care about having the current USDA database.

 

 

 

For more serious calorie restrictors the NutriBase 10 CR Way Edition software offerings deserve consideration.The software includes glucose tracking. The entries can be time stamped and graphed against carbohydrate intake and exercise. This function leads to invaluable insights for getting glucose under control. To find out more about the value of keeping glucose at low levels, use this link to the Society response to the NIA monkey study: http://www.crsociety.org/science/nia_monkey_study. Scroll to the center of the page and you will find this chart:

 

“AMP Activated Protein Kinase

Calorie Restriction Metabolism Coordinator”

 

 

AMP Kinase becomes active when calories and glucose levels are low, producing the extraordinary benefits shown in the chart.

 

 

 

If you have a weight management goal – whether it’s to lose, gain, or maintain weight –the software's "calories in, calories out" function is indispensable. Starting with total calorie intake and calorie expenditure for exercise and other daily activities, the software's charting function automatically graphs calories-burned data, so you can adjust your intake and exercise, accordingly.

 

 

 

The more advanced NutriBase 10 CR Way Longer Life Edition software took years to develop. Here we include organ optimization guides for the heart and kidneys. The idea is to protect these organs against age-related decline, by following a CR lifestyle that protects them and enhances their function.

 

 

 

For example, consider the kidney section. Two doctors worked with us to develop it. A telling feature is the correlation of ultrasound pictures of my kidneys and my dietary oxalate intake. This is an entirely new focus in my CR lifestyle. As it turns out, dietary oxalate can accumulate in the kidneys (and in other organs, like the heart) causing dangerous debris buildup that leads to kidney stones, reduction of glomerular filtration rate and plaque accumulation. Here is some more about that : Kidney Stone Prevention Program

 

 

 

 

 

It may be that calorie restrictors are more vulnerable to this than others because favorite foods like sweet potatoes, beets, leafy greens, and walnuts are very high in oxalates. Also healthy disposal of oxalate through urine requires ATP, which is appropriately low on CR folk.

 

 

 

Overall, I spent a couple of years researching this, which finally led to the addition of oxalate content data to the Longer Life edition. It also led to a kidney stone profile test that is user friendly. Besides being helpful to calorie restrictors, we hope it will be of interest to doctors for treatment of kidney stone patients. If it really takes off, we will use revenue from the proceeds to fund CR research.

 

 

 

Paul

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"The more advanced NutriBase 10 CR Way Longer Life Edition software took years to develop. Here we include organ optimization guides for the heart and kidneys. The idea is to protect these organs against age-related decline, by following a CR lifestyle that protects them and enhances their function.

 

 

 

For example, consider the kidney section. Two doctors worked with us to develop it. A telling feature is the correlation of ultrasound pictures of my kidneys and my dietary oxalate intake. This is an entirely new focus in my CR lifestyle. As it turns out, dietary oxalate can accumulate in the kidneys (and in other organs, like the heart) causing dangerous debris buildup that leads to kidney stones, reduction of glomerular filtration rate and plaque accumulation. Here is some more about that : Kidney Stone Prevention Program

 

 

 

 

 

It may be that calorie restrictors are more vulnerable to this than others because favorite foods like sweet potatoes, beets, leafy greens, and walnuts are very high in oxalates. Also healthy disposal of oxalate through urine requires ATP, which is appropriately low on CR folk.

 

 

 

Overall, I spent a couple of years researching this, which finally led to the addition of oxalate content data to the Longer Life edition. It also led to a kidney stone profile test that is user friendly. Besides being helpful to calorie restrictors, we hope it will be of interest to doctors for treatment of kidney stone patients. If it really takes off, we will use revenue from the proceeds to fund CR research."

 

 

I am still learning about oxalates and their deleterious effects. It seemed likely to me that if they are able to form deposits in the kidneys, that other tissues would be targets too. I found this study regarding that:

 

 

 

Atherosclerotic oxalosis in coronary arteries.

Cardiovasc Pathol. 2008 Mar-Apr;17(2):117-23.

 

 

 

Fishbein GA, Micheletti RG, Currier JS, Singer E, Fishbein MC.

 

 

Source

Division of Anatomic Pathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. gfishbein@ucla.edu

 

 

Abstract

 

BACKGROUND:

Systemic oxalosis may be hereditary or acquired. In these cases, calcium oxalate deposits have been reported in numerous tissues, including the media of arteries. In any category, calcium oxalate deposition has not been described within atherosclerotic plaques in any arteries.

 

 

METHODS:

As part of a retrospective clinicopathologic study, 80 hearts were obtained from the National Neurological AIDS Bank in an effort to study coronary atherosclerosis in patients infected with HIV. The population consisted of 66 HIV-positive and 14 HIV-negative patients with an average age of 47 years; 79% were males. Proximal coronary arteries were serially sectioned and processed routinely. Sections were studied by hematoxylin and eosin staining and, in selected cases, von Kossa stain and alizarin red S under different conditions, including polarized light, to allow distinction of calcium phosphate from calcium oxalate. Medical histories, autopsy reports, and general autopsy slides were reviewed.

 

 

RESULTS:

In four patients (three with AIDS), calcium oxalate crystals were observed within atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries. Similar deposits were seen in the thyroid gland and other organs but not in the kidneys. None of the patients had chronic renal failure.

 

 

CONCLUSION:

The calcium oxalate crystal deposits observed in the atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries of these four patients are unique in two ways: (a) these deposits have not previously been described in atherosclerotic plaques; (B) the patients did not demonstrate any of the recognized patterns of oxalosis. We suggest the phrase "atherosclerotic oxalosis" to describe this finding.

 

PMID:18329558

 

 

 

 

This is why I am so involved with research. I would very much like to look at things like this and figure out the best CR practices so we can get the full benefits of the lifestyle.

 

 

 

 

Paul

 

 

 

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On reducing harm from oxalates, http://www.lef.org/protocols/kidney_urinary/kidney_health_03.htm mentions consuming:

 

Citrate: "potassium/magnesium citrate effectively prevents recurrent calcium oxalate stones, and this treatment given for up to 3 years reduces risk of recurrence by 85%" (Ettinger 1997); and

 

Calcium: "calcium and oxalic acid ... form calcium oxalate inside the kidneys. Oxalic acid is able to pass through the intestinal wall, into the blood, and enter the kidneys where it has a chance to combine with calcium. Calcium oxalate, when normally combined inside the digestive tract, does not pass through the intestinal wall and into the blood, but is eliminated with other waste products. Therefore, when combined with dietary or supplemental calcium inside the intestinal tract, oxalic acid will never reach the kidneys; thus, calcium oxalate kidney stones cannot be formed ... dietary calcium intake from food or supplements reduced the risk of renal calculi; calcium supplementation must be taken with food and in small dosages (< 400 mg)...."

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