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Michael R

Intermittent Fasting: BBC Documentary and ABC Interview

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BBC health journalist Dr. Michael Mosley's stories on the 5:2 Diet, particular form of intermittent fasting:

 

With 5:2 intermittent fasting you eat normally five days a week and diet two days a week, cutting your calorie intake for those two days to a ¼ of their normal level. This means that on, say, a Monday and a Thursday you will eat 500 calories if you are a woman, 600 if you are a man.

 

The big interest has led to a separate line of 5:2 diet books in addition to Mosley's own 5:2 "Fast Diet" books, and resources like healthy recipes with 250 or fewer Calories from the British newspaper The Telegraph. and many-many websites with 5:2 diet meal plans. There's even a line of 5:2  diet packaged foods available in the UK!

 

The surge in public interest really got started with a Mosley's BBC Horizons Documentary "Eat, Fast and Live Longer." Now the video is available (with Slovakian subtitles), as is an interview on the 5:2 diet with Mosley on "The Science Show" from Australia's public broadcaster. Enjoy!

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All these fancy diets work because people eat so bad that any positive healthy behavior improves your health. Is there any evidence that shows 5:2 diet works if you are already eating super healthy? I don't think so, and even if there is, it would be so small to worth the effort. For me, otherwise, this is just to give people excuses to continue their bad diets i.e for other 5 days.

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In the video several other forms of fasting were looked at.  Michael Mosley did a 4 day water only fast under the supervision of Valter Longo.  I think he did a trial of alternate day fasting too.  The 5:2 regimen was the least structured and the one he found easiest to adopt.  It was not in anyway suggested as optimal, merely doable for someone who had little dedication to the goal of improving health.

 

But when it comes to optimization I think most of us are rolling dice.  There is an awful lot of uncertainty, especially on an individual basis.

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