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Dean Pomerleau

Article - When Less Is More: The Challenges Of The Caloric Restriction Diet

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Al Pater posted this popular press article on CR (thanks Al!):

 

http://www.medicaldaily.com/when-less-more-challenges-caloric-restriction-diet-354482

 

It's a pretty balanced story, discussing both the potential upsides and possible risks of CR. It covers the CR primates studies, and it references to the research of Roy Walford and Luigi Fontana, and mentions our own Brian Delaney. Unfortunately (from Brian's perspective at least  :) ) it uses the term CRON.

 

Here is the concluding paragraph:

 

One might presume that a diet plan that promises to extend longevity would see us all signing up en masse , but perhaps CR takes a special kind of commitment that is beyond most of us. Those of us who love our grub might find a calorie-restricted existence to be rather joyless. It seems a universal truth that most things that are good for us are generally not much fun. Maybe someday, scientists will point to the health benefits of watching box sets of Game of Thrones with a six-pack of beer. Until then, however, we will have to aspire to the CR diet.

 

--Dean

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Unfortunately (from Brian's perspective at least  :) ) it uses the term CRON.

 

Arg!! No, seriously, though: it's a pretty balanced article. And the CR Society is committed to being more pro-science than pro-CR. That is, if the science starts pointing to doubts about CR, than the Society needs to acknowledge those doubts.

 

- Brian

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The CR Society is committed to being more pro-science than pro-CR. That is, if the science starts pointing to doubts about CR, than the Society needs to acknowledge those doubts.

 

- Brian

 

That is a great attitude that I agree with. The goal of CR Society shouldn't be to promote CR, but to promote health and longevity through the practice of CR. If CR turns out not to be beneficial for health and longevity in humans, we ought to acknowledge this.

 

I suspect that for the most part CR will turn out to be (quite?) beneficial if practiced during early-adulthood and middle age, but CR pushed too hard into one's later years may be counterproductive for health and longevity, especially if one has trouble maintaining weight.

 

--Dean

Edited by Dean Pomerleau

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Hi again, Dean and Brian!

 

An example comes to mind:  I have two CR buddies here in Rochester, NY -- we try to share a lunch in some appropriate restaurant once a month.  One of my buddies is in his 50's, and on very mild CR.  He seems fine.  The other is super-intelligent, in his late 80's, and is on strict CRON diet -- he uses alternate day fasting.  Both of them are vegan.  (I'm the only non-vegan in the bunch.)

 

The older one is in terrible shape.  He was hospitalized last year, nearly died, and was later released; he could barely walk.  He's now able to walk, feebly, with a cane.  I intend to encourage him to greatly up his protein intake, and especially to eat fatty fish, such as salmon (as advised by his physician).

 

We've noted in previous posts that past a certain age, upping (quality) protein is a good idea.  My elderly Cronnie buddy comes to mind. 

 

(Concerning myself, IMO, my physical age is lower than my biological age -- 76 -- so I continue to restrict protein, almost always as fish (rarely from vegan sources).  I've been on CR froabout 20 years.  I'm quite healthy, with a healthy appetite, and I continue to eat mostly with raw veggies.)

 

  -- Saul

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Saul,

 

I agree with your thinking regarding you older CR buddy. At some (physical) age (or level of decrepitude), it is probably wise to dial back on the CR,by  increasing calorie and protein intake to avoid sarcopenia and nutrient deficits due to poorer absorption.

 

It sure would be nice if we could have more data on this (i.e. what are the best markers to decide when to back off?), but I suspect it is unlikely to be anything but anecdotal for a long time to come.

 

--Dean

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