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This might be a bit obsessive compulsive, but the reason I use an airtight sealable glass jar is because I don't want air/oxygen getting into it - I open the freezer every day, so there's always air/oxygen there. Storing n3 is best in a cold, airtight, dark environment - so an airtight jar in the freezer. Though honestly, storing it in any container probably makes no difference - though personally I try to avoid plastic containers for food, hence a glass jar.

Of course, if you grind just before you eat, then you avoid all those problems - but grinding daily is too much for me... although I do grind coffee beans daily, so... 

Edited by TomBAvoider

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2 hours ago, Clinton said:

 

 

Ooooppsss...

I goofed!

I was thinking of Arsenic, not cyanide -- inorganic arsenic is poisonous, organic probably isn't.

Cyanide is, to the best of my knowledge, poisonous.

Sorry,

  --  Saul 

 

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20 hours ago, mccoy said:

That's totally right, but 40 grams average daily is a hell of a lot of ground flaxseed! Together with all the fiber-rich foods I eat, it gives me the sh1ts!...

LOL!  Yeah, I am pretty regular.  But I find the water kefir contributing more to it than flax.

I just took a look at Cronometer and over the last year, I average just over 30g of flax per day, which provides just over 70% of my 11g average daily intake of Omega-3 Omega-6 is at 15g average, but probably higher lately, as I have upped the intake of walnuts and almonds bit.

Maybe I'll add cyanide to the test I will get in about a month.

Here is another short video on cyanide and almonds:
 

 

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On 5/16/2020 at 3:21 PM, TomBAvoider said:

I simply bought an extra electric coffee grinder that's dedicated to this...

OK, mine was delivered today.

I am a grinder now.... (No, not on that Grinder :)

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Is almond milk just as good? When I eat nuts, I tend to overeat (sometimes even up to 1lb of nuts a day). Almond milks make it much easier to not overeat

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3 hours ago, Mike41 said:

Almond milk is processed junk food imo. Eat Whole Foods like nuts. Much better choice health wise.

Mike 41 is absolutely right.

Guy nuts you don't "love."  I can keep almonds and walnuts, but if I have cashews, I eat more than I should. So, I don't buy them often.

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I'm not so contrary to almond milk, except that it is too costly where I live.

An excellent combination is chia seeds soaked in almond milk, it's good-tasting, very satiating and nutritionally rich. Add berries to it, it becomes an absolute delicacy.

 

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Edited by mccoy

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1 hour ago, mccoy said:

I'm not so contrary to almond milk, except that it is too costly

Yeah, nothing terribly wrong with almond milk,  but  it doesn't provide the dense nutrition of almonds themselves.    Almond milk is basically ground almonds and water--  lots of water! --  with fiber strained out (commercial brands may add sweeteners, thickeners, calcium etc.)   I'd be curious to know how many almonds go into a liter of almond milk.   You are paying a lot for very few almonds, that's for sure.

Perhaps it would be more cost effective to make your own almond milk.   I don't know.   But it does taste pleasant and makes a good base for various nutritionally rich drinks,  as you point out.

Edited by Sibiriak

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Back in Aug 2019 I posted a link to this study here

Effect of pistachio consumption on the modulation of urinary gut microbiota-related metabolites in prediabetic subjects (2017)

Quote

The specific nutritional composition of nuts could affect different metabolic pathways involved in a broad range of metabolic diseases. We therefore investigated whether chronic consumption of pistachio nuts modifies the urine metabolome in prediabetic subjects. We designed a randomized crossover clinical trial in 39 prediabetic subjects. They consumed a pistachio-supplemented diet (PD, 50% carbohydrates, 33% fat, including 57 g/d of pistachios daily) and a control diet (CD, 55% carbohydrates, 30% fat) for 4 months each, separated by a 2-week wash-out. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NRM) was performed to determine changes in 24-h urine metabolites. Significant changes in urine metabolites according to the different intervention periods were found in uni- and multivariate analysis. Score plot of the first two components of the multilevel partial least squares discriminant analysis (ML-PLS-DA) showed a clear separation of the intervention periods.

Three metabolites related with gut microbiota metabolism (i.e., hippurate, p-cresol sulfate and dimethylamine) were found decreased in PD compared with CD (P<.05). Moreover, cis-aconitate [intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA)] was also found decreased following PD compared with CD.

Intragroup analysis showed that creatinine levels were significantly increased in PD (P=.023), whereas trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) was found significantly reduced following PD (P=.034).

Our results suggest that chronic pistachio consumption may modulate some urinary metabolites related to gut microbiota metabolism and the TCA cycle; all associated with metabolic derangements associated with insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes.

 

Is there something special about pistachios in that regard compared to other nuts?  Maybe there is.  I just ran across this:

Plant-Based Fat, Dietary Patterns Rich in Vegetable Fat and Gut Microbiota Modulation  (2019)

Quote

Nuts are a complex matrix of nutrients especially rich in fiber, unsaturated fatty acids (UNFAs) and different bioactive compounds such as tocopherols, phytosterols, phenolic compounds, and minerals such as magnesium (32). Some of these nutrients can reach the colon intact, being able to change the gastrointestinal microbiota composition and function. Different nutrients and their metabolites, such as polyphenols have shown to aid in gut microbiota balance and growth of beneficial bacteria [reviewed in (33)].

The fermentation of fiber from nuts or other sources to beneficial end-products (e.g., butyric acid) and the biotransformation of phytochemicals have been reported to be associated with the transition to a healthier microbiota (34). Thus, nuts could exhibit prebiotic effects by enriching potentially beneficial microorganisms such as Bifidobacteria or lactic acid bacteria (35).

Fat from nuts may have also a major impact on gut microbiota because a considerable amount of fat present in nuts can arrive intact to the colon.

Incomplete mastication* or inaccessible fats inside cell structures remain unabsorbed during digestion and this small degree of fat moves to the intestine, serving as a prebiotic (36, 37). Atwater factors of almonds (38), pistachios (39), walnuts (40), and cashews (41) have indeed showed an overestimation of measured energy contents.

Among nuts, almonds, pistachios, and walnuts have showed to have different protective properties modulating, for example, insulin resistance, glucose metabolism, and lipid profile [reviewed in (42), (43), and (44)]. However, their prebiotic properties were not well-characterized until a few years ago.

Different in vitro and in vivo studies have analyzed the prebiotic effect and fermentation properties of raw and roasted almonds, as well as almond skins. These studies have shown the ability of different components of almonds that could positively alter the composition of gut bacteria (4547). In fact, a stimulatory effect on Lactobacillus spp., and Bifidobacterium spp., has been observed from raw and roasted almond consumption (47).

Beyond almonds, several clinical feeding trials have demonstrated a modulatory effect of other types of nuts on gut microbiota.

First in 2014, Ukhanova et al., performed two separated randomized, controlled, cross-over feeding studies with healthy subjects, giving them either almonds (n = 18) or pistachios (n = 16), in three interventions (no nuts, 42 or 84 g/day) each for 18 days (48). They showed that both types of nuts significantly affected microbiota.

However, the prebiotic effect of pistachio intake on gut microbiota composition was much stronger than that of almond consumption.

Moreover, pistachios increased the number of butyrate-producing bacteria, identified as potentially beneficial, whereas the numbers of Bifidobacterium were not affected by the consumption of either type of nut (48).

[*almonds are excellent for practicing yogi mastication--Sibiriak]

 

Edited by Sibiriak

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3 hours ago, Sibiriak said:

The specific nutritional composition of nuts could affect different metabolic pathways involved in a broad range of metabolic diseases.

That's one of the key concepts. A while ago, I posted some info on different phytochemicals, characteristic of different nuts. They tend to be specific, hence the use of ingesting the whole gamut of nuts and seeds available. On the other side, we all know that and it is true of many other foods.

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4 hours ago, Sibiriak said:

Yeah, nothing terribly wrong with almond milk,  but  it doesn't provide the dense nutrition of almonds themselves.    Almond milk is basically ground almonds and water--  lots of water! --  with fiber strained out (commercial brands may add sweeteners, thickeners, calcium etc.)   I'd be curious to know how many almonds go into a liter of almond milk.   You are paying a lot for very few almonds, that's for sure.

Perhaps it would be more cost effective to make your own almond milk.   I don't know.   But it does taste pleasant and makes a good base for various nutritionally rich drinks,  as you point out.

Way to much calcium especially if your drinking several cups a day. Evidence that excess calcium contributes to heart disease

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7 hours ago, Sibiriak said:

I'd be curious to know how many almonds go into a liter of almond milk.

Based on the protein, the only ingredient in almond milk containing it, a cup has about 5 g:

Silk® Unsweetened Original Almond Beverage

Ingredients
INGREDIENTS: Almond Base (Filtered Water, Almonds), Sea Salt, Locust Bean Gum, Sunflower Lecithin, Gellan Gum, Natural Flavour.
VITAMINS & MINERALS: Calcium Carbonate, Zinc Gluconate, Vitamin A Palmitate, Riboflavin (B2), Vitamin D2, Vitamin B12.
https://www.drinksilk.ca/products/unsweetened-original-almond-beverage#:~:text=INGREDIENTS%3A Almond Base (Filtered Water,%2C Vitamin D2%2C Vitamin B12.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Serving Size: 1 Cup (240mL)
Servings Per Container About 8
Calories: 60 % Daily Value*
Total Fat: 2.5g3%
Saturated Fat: 0g0%
Trans Fat: 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.5g
Monounsaturated Fat: 1.5g
Cholesterol: 0mg0%
Sodium: 150mg7%
Total Carbohydrate: 8g3%
Dietary Fiber: 0g0%
Total Sugars: 7g
Includes 7g Added Sugars14%
Protein: 1g
Vitamin A 2.5mcg10%
Calcium: 450mg30%
Iron: 0.5mg2%
Potassium: 0mg0%
Vitamin A: 150mcg15%
Vitamin E: 4mg25%
Magnesium: 15mg2%
https://silk.com/plant-based-products/almondmilk/original-almondmilk/
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>

Nuts, almonds, dry roasted, without salt added
Protein & Amino Acids
Amounts Per Selected Serving[100g] %DV
Protein 22.1g 44%
https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3087/2

Edited by AlPater

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5 hours ago, Sibiriak said:

I'd buy brands without added calcium.

Please let me know of any. I do like the stuff for taste, not health, and it’s super low in calories, 30 per cup, although Dean’s example is 60. Also the diamond brand is super low in phosphorus a plus imo, but the damn calcium is more than even cows milk and I already get enough. I have not been able to find anything be it oat, almond soy etc that has little or no calcium added.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/calcium_supplements_may_damage_the_heart

Edited by Mike41

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Almond or other nut milks are very easy to make at home if you have a high quality blender like a Vitamix. Below is a video on the process.

I'm not drinking it these days, but when I did I made my own. The nice thing is you can control how "creamy" it is by how long you blend and how much (if any) of the solids you strain out using a nut bag. You can also use your own sweetener (or not) and add vanilla (or not) for extra flavor.

--Dean

 

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The question was: "Is almond milk just as good" as eating nuts?

The answer is clearly no, based on nutritional profile, even for home made, not fortified almond milk. 

It's a great substitute for animal milk, if you need it in your coffee, of course.

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17 hours ago, Dean Pomerleau said:

Almond or other nut milks are very easy to make at home if you have a high quality blender like a Vitamix. Below is a video on the process.

I'm not drinking it these days, but when I did I made my own. The nice thing is you can control how "creamy" it is by how long you blend and how much (if any) of the solids you strain out using a nut bag. You can also use your own sweetener (or not) and add vanilla (or not) for extra flavor.

--Dean

 

Well I don’t have a vitamix, but I like the looks of it and all I need to do is taste it. I was surprised how milk like It was. I figured it would look messy. I’m hoping a blender will do the job

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A more time-consuming way, but maybe less messy, would be to skin the almonds one by one, so to avoid to strain the smoothie and probably retaining more of the pulp. I used to do that. No longer!

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1 hour ago, Sibiriak said:

Eat the skins.  They are especially rich in polyphenols,  prebiotic fiber etc.

I agree, that's why I forgot about almond milk. But sometimes there might be a reason to avoid the skin, like teeth problems and more...

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2 hours ago, Sibiriak said:

Skins too hard--risk of fracture?

I had a fractured tooth a few years ago but I suspect it was some small pebbles rather than almonds skin. Although after dental interventions sometimes I cannot chew very well. In the past my teeth have been oversensitive to acids (in fruit) and even almond skins were annoying. Also, I found that lots of almonds, with skin, in addition to other fibers, give me loose bowels. Right now I usually eat from 2 to 4 ounces of nuts per day, almonds with their skin. When a young man I ate up to one pound of almonds, with skin or skinless, depending on my mood, but it was overindulgence. Almonds and raisins are addictive.

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FWIW, my periodontist told me to soak the almonds before I eat them, so as to make them softer. He claims chomping on hard nuts like almonds damages the roots of teeth and makes them looser in the jaw. I ignored his suggestion, and eat almonds daily without soaking. I am very conflicted however - on the one hand, he's a periodontist, so I assume he must know what he's talking about, but on the other it's extremely counter-intuitive, because I thought that it's precisely the chewing action which makes the tooth anchoring stronger in the jaw.

The other thing is that there are a lot of studies out there on chewing almonds specifically. Apparently, the fact that the almonds are not chewed fully translates into several things - for one, you absorb less energy than is nominally in the nut - I guess not all the lipids are liberated. But for another, incomplete mashing of the almonds through chewing means that more of the intact particles end up deeper in your digetstive gut and only get processed there, which has some benefits. Of course, you regularly hear from people who claim that they see small particles of undigested nuts in their BMs (I see no such thing in my case). Thing is, I chew the nuts pretty thoroughly, so I don't know how I stack up compared to the average chewer in those studies.

 

Edited by TomBAvoider

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I love cold oats so my almonds and walnuts end up soaked! Tastier in my opinion and I like the texture. 
 

My own cold oats recipe:

boil ten cups of water and then add:

5 cups of oat

4 ounces of almonds/walnuts

2.5 Tbs chia/flax ground

10 ounces Frozen strawberries

10 ounces Frozen blueberries
1 tsp cinnamon

3 Tbs vanilla


 

stir it up and store it in individual containers in the refrigerator. You can add vegan milks, yogurt, crispy whole grain cereals, maple syrup or whatever else you fancy. Once it’s made it lasts at least 5 days. Very convenient and delicious
 

 

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