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Dean Pomerleau

Cold Exposure & Other Mild Stressors for Increased Health & Longevity

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Thanks.

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...novel targets for future medicines he calls “temperature mimetics,” which could offer the health-promoting effects without having to reduce body temperature.  

CE mimetics,  CR mimetics,  fasting mimetics,  exercise mimetics etc.-- everyone's looking for  (patentable) mimetics.  But the real things are right there,  free for the taking.  Ain't nothin' like the real thing,  baby!

 

 

 

Edited by Sibiriak

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On 9/9/2020 at 2:16 AM, Sibiriak said:

Thanks.

CE mimetics,  CR mimetics,  fasting mimetics,  exercise mimetics etc.-- everyone's looking for  (patentable) mimetics.  But the real things are right there,  free for the taking.  Ain't nothin' like the real thing,  baby!

So much easier to pop a pill than wearing an ice vest all day (typing this as I'm wearing an ice vest, haha)

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Just published study again shows that cold exposure is critically important for the benefits of CR

  1. View ORCID ProfileCarlos Guijas1,*,
  2. View ORCID ProfileJ. Rafael Montenegro-Burke1,*
  3. View ORCID ProfileRigo Cintron-Colon2,*
  4. View ORCID ProfileXavier Domingo-Almenara1
  5. View ORCID ProfileManuel Sanchez-Alavez2
  6. View ORCID ProfileCarlos A. Aguirre2
  7. View ORCID ProfileKokila Shankar2
  8. View ORCID ProfileErica L.-W. Majumder1
  9. View ORCID ProfileElizabeth Billings1
  10. View ORCID ProfileBruno Conti2,3,, and 
  11. View ORCID ProfileGary Siuzdak1,4,

 See all authors and affiliations

Science Signaling  08 Sep 2020:
Vol. 13, Issue 648, eabb2490
DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.abb2490
 
813bf3f8-b80b-4412-adc7-e2ef866f7ff8-egg

METABOLISM BOOST?

CALORIE RESTRICTION CAN EXTEND LIFE— STUDY EXPLAINS ONE FACTOR INVOLVED

Eating less may have an oddly positive effect on metabolism.

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LOL, cold again.  It constricts your arteries, which is one major reason more people die during the cold months.

Lab rats are one thing, the Spaniards and the Norwegians are quite another. You'd think the climate would have a dramatic effect if this theory was true, at least like diet, right?  But if anything, the colder it is, the faster they die, even with more money to spend on health care....

Edited by Ron Put

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Right Ron, avoid cold exposure if you have heart disease. Then again, it’s good for people with elevated blood glucose, so it likely helps prevent heart disease in the first place.  In the era of indoor heating and air conditioning, climate has little affect on humans’ living temperatures.

Edited by Gordo

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On 9/19/2020 at 4:50 AM, Ron Put said:

You'd think the climate would have a dramatic effect if this theory was true...

No you wouldn't.   Following a systematic, well-designed program of cold exposure (CE) is NOT the same as living in a cold climate.  ( I live in Siberia-- I can assure you almost no one there practices CE,  nor is the average lifestyle particularly healthy.  Health/longevity statistics about  Siberians wouldn't tell you jack  about  CE practice by health-oriented individuals.)

Likewise,  following a systematic program of sport, resistance training,  aerobic exercise etc is not the same as doing manual labor work for years.

Equally important:  no claim is being made that  practicing CE  by itself would necessarily provide huge health benefits.   The suggestion is  that CE works synergistically with calorie moderation,  protein moderation,  optimized  personalized  nutrition,  systematic exercise etc.

 

Edited by Sibiriak

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On 9/21/2020 at 11:27 PM, Sibiriak said:

Equally important:  no claim is being made that  practicing CE  by itself would necessarily provide huge health benefits.   The suggestion is  that CE works synergistically with calorie moderation,  protein moderation,  optimized  personalized  nutrition,  systematic exercise etc.

Fair points. But still:

Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure

"Cold temperatures have adverse effects on the human cardiovascular system. Animals develop hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy during exposure to cold. Cold exposure activates the SNS which, in turn, increases the activity of the RAS (Fig. 3). The RAS suppresses eNOS expression and decreases NO production which contributes the development of CIH. The RAS also mediates the cold-induced increase in ET-1 production. Cold exposure up-regulates ETA but down-regulates ETB receptors. This unique pattern of changes in the ET system may be involved in the development of CIH. The relationship of the SNS, the RAS, the ET system and the NO system in the development of CIH is summarized in Figure 3. The mechanism of CICH may be different from that of CIH. The development of CICH is disassociated with CIH and is independent of the SNS and the RAS. The protooncogene c-myc is up-regulated in the hearts of cold-exposed rats, which may mediate CICH. The potential role of thyroid hormones in the cold-induced up-regulation of c-mycneeds to be evaluated. CIH and CICH are prototypic models of environmentally-induced hypertension and hypertrophy, which are induced without surgical intervention, genetic manipulation or large doses of drugs or hormones."

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8 hours ago, Ron Put said:

Fair points. But still:  Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure

Ron,  that study has already been posted and discussed in this thread here.   I'm not sure the point of your bringing it up again without adding anything new.

Please review the related comments made then by Gordo,  Dean,  TomB et al.,  if you don't remember them.

I'll quote just two:

On 7/24/2019 at 3:35 AM, Dean Pomerleau said:

Thanks Ron and Gordo. Those are interesting studies, and are definitely a reason for caution against extreme forms of cold exposure.

All of the animals studies cited in those papers involved long-term exposure to very low temperature, i.e. 40F/5C continuously for 1-5 weeks at a time. 40degF is a full 40degF colder the thermoneutral temperature of the mice involved in the study.

This is opposed to the 10degF below thermoneutrality (~70F) that appears beneficial for rodent health and longevity in combination with CR.

The human study you cite Ron exposed healthy young men to even colder (38F/4C) with a 14 mph wind blowing on them. All the subjects started shivering within 5min and continued shivering throughout the experiment.

This is much more extreme CE than I would recommend and it isn't surprising their cardiovascular system responded with vasoconstriction, elevated BP and arterial stiffening.

Like with both CR and exercise, it is possible to go too far with CE. Shivering is a sign of going too far.

My recommendation remains to engage in incidental cold exposure (e.g. cold showers and not over dressing on mildly cold days) and/or a couple/few hours per day of controlled exposure to the equivalent of 10deg below human thermoneutrality (i.e. ~62 deg lightly dressed, or wearing a cold vest) to maximize the potential benefits and minimize potential risks.

On 7/24/2019 at 7:38 AM, TomBAvoider said:

OMG, people! I feel like a broken record: the dose makes the poison! This has been known for hundreds of years! This is why (I'm relating this for about the 100th time), whenever I hear about a drug or an intervention, my first question is - "dose and protocol?" It is completely worthless without that. You can overdose on water and die, it doesn't mean water is bad for you. 

It's great to cite studies for and against CE, but unless we fully understand dosing/protocol, interpreting the study is impossible. And again, that goes both ways - for the proponents of CE as much as for the sceptics of CE. That's one of the reasons why I am so deeply suspicious of animal studies when it comes to applying to humans - even if a given, very particular and specific physiological reaction is exactly the same between a mouse/rat/animal and a human (pretty rare), you still cannot be confident about how to convert a dose/protocol from animal values to equivalent human values [...]

 

The point about dosing/protocols is crucial,  imo.   My personal regime is even more intermittent than the one Dean described.  It involves a mix of  cold showers, cold baths,  cold-water swimming,  and slightly under-dressing on cold days for fairly short periods.  It incorporates standard principles of  progressive training adaptation, with some strategies taken from periodized resistance training theory.  I don't do  any kind of  protracted exposure to very cold temperatures.

And btw, I've always found the effects to be quite  pleasurable,  invigorating and health-promoting. 

I can understand though  that if you are cold-phobic,  have unusually strong concerns about heart disease, or  feel you might to be too frail to endure repeated CE hormetic challenges,  the addition of a systematic CE protocol to a calorie moderation+WFPBD+ exercise regime  would not be something you'd want to consider.

 

Edited by Sibiriak

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There are many angles to the CE issue and how methods are applied. This is something to approach with caution and graduality. I think I wrote about the surge in pressure I feel when going suddenly under a very cold shower, so I start from legs, arms and only after one minute I fully soak the head and the whole body. The jet can be adjusted to be less concentrated and distribute the water more evenly over the body, that contributes to avoid a pressure surge. The timing can vary from one minute to ten minutes, even though the latter is an upper bound to me in very cold water. After a real cold shower I dress up and stay near a heat source to heat up. Exercise is also good. Walking outside in a T shirt is good and actually pleasant, prolonged shivering and frozen hands may warn that you are overdoing it. A definite advantage is the awakened and alert state from norepinephrine release.

I believe that intermittent shivering has also benefits, as far as it's not overdone.

Beyond the health benefits, some people enjoy the mental power, the freedom from climate adversities. Some people even enjoy showing off walking with a T shirt in freezing temperatures. Sometimes I overdo that and, especially when it's windy, and I find myself in a very uncomfortable state, a freezing hell, but it is all good, it makes you appreciate the basic commodities of life, simple heating when you are back home.

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On 9/24/2020 at 12:14 AM, Sibiriak said:

I can understand though  that if you are cold-phobic,  have unusually strong concerns about heart disease, or  feel you might to be too frail to endure repeated CE hormetic challenges

LOLZ.  Frankly, I had forgotten that this particular study was posted, but a reminder that cold exposure triggers hypertension, and hypertrophy is nevertheless warranted.

My take is that cold exposure is on balance detrimental, and more so if one already has CVD.  Dosage is important, of course, but just like with EVOO, I don't see compelling evidence to convince me that any of it is beneficial. Don't mean to throw more oil on the fire.

You are kind of right, I'd rather not have heart disease. I know that cold showers can be "invigorating," but then so are shots of vodka. Personally, I have lived in some very, very cold places and I would not voluntarily choose to live in such places nowadays.

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