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Dean Pomerleau

CR Veteran(s?) Share Their Perspective

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[Admin Note: This thread was originally part of this one but got side-tracked onto the very interesting topic of why people (and in particularly CR veterans) aren't more active on these forums and in general what they've been up to. So I've created this new thread for the topic, starting with my own post below soliciting feedback. I'm hoping other veterans besides Khurram with post their own perspectives too! --Dean]

 

Zeta wrote:

Of course, I'm not really on CR right now...


Of course, many would say I'm not either, if you look at my raw calorie intake and ignore my net energy balance and weight/BMI.

It seems ironic (and rather sad), that the two most active members of these CR Forums are not actually practicing CR, by the strict definition of the term. I wonder why that is, and particularly why the CR veterans that we know lurk on these forums from the CR demographics survey results won't seem to participate in the discussions.

I can think of several possibilities:

  • CR is simply another part of their life, so fully integrated and natural they don't care to talk about it, or to socialize with other like-minded individuals on topics of health and longevity on these forums.
  • They are simply too busy to bother contributing to the discussions.
  • They are somewhat selfish - content to absorb the information shared on these forums, but unwilling to contribute to it.
  • They are too private to feel comfortable sharing, although this one seems unlikely given how easy it is to remain anonymous if one wishes.
  • They don't have the energy to engage in the lively discussions we have. :)xyz
  • They think they've heard it all before, and all we're doing is rehashing things they (think they) already know about CR, and health/longevity in general.
  • There are no 'true believers' anymore in the human longevity benefits of CR in the strictest sense of the concept, or perhaps more accurately, the benefits don't seem worth the costs, and so everyone has moved towards different strategies for maximizing health/longevity, and don't feel the need to talk about it here.

Its great to see Khurram pop his head up on another thread. I think I'll ask him what he's been up to and why he's chosen not to be more active here.

I'd be very interested in hearing other CR veterans' answer to why they aren't more active here. If you'd rather not post about it, feel free to drop me a quick note via the private message function of these forums or via email to dean@pomerleaus.com.

--Dean

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Well, my reasons for not keeping up with the CRS are long and complicated.

 

Dean: I think I'll try out the this Forum's PM to fill in some FYI stuff only 'The Originals' may be interested in.

 

My CR is diet is (and has been in auto pilot). Yup same for years: raw veggies and a few Purina Primate LabDiet biscuits -- about 1200-1300 total cal/day -- is routine.  I'll try to spell it out soon in the Profile section.

 

Let's cut right to the chase ... Dean's query about not being (more) active in the CRS. 

 

The diet and other health/exercise regimens are all in the daily background.  In many ways, CR is boring ;)  Even the science is boring because, frankly, I don't see a whole lot of ground-breaking action**  -- even in LE in general. 

 

Metaphysics and "new spiritualites" have been new sources of interest:

https://www.youtube.com/user/scienceandnonduality

TED talks and Talks@Google (youtube channel) can also be interesting.

 

Bottom line: 120 years is still too short. And, in any case, I can imagine myself getting bored in the same old physical world no matter how long physical life was extended.

 

----------------------

** CR, in many ways, is like pop research. The sheer volume of CR-related papers Al posts seems to indicate this. It's tried n' tested science; and getting the results YOU WANT/EXPECT is an effective way to ensure grants/funding -- a cash cow. The politics of science, funding and academia are complex. Maybe someone needs to write and publish a book called The Trouble With Life Extension ( a play on Lee Smolin's 2006 The Trouble With Physics)

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Hi Khurram. Thanks for your response. I look forward to hearing more about long and complicated story via private message when you get a chance. Alternatively we could catch up on skype if you'd prefer.

 

But in the meantime, you post raises several interesting issues in my mind.

 

My CR is diet is (and has been in auto pilot). Yup same for years: raw veggies and a few Purina Primate LabDiet biscuits -- about 1200-1300 total cal/day -- is routine.  I'll try to spell it out soon in the Profile section.

 

Fascinating. I had forgotten about your experiment with eating primate chow, which you posted about to the email list many years ago. Apparently it has been working reasonably well for you. I think this is interesting enough that I'm going to turn it into its own thread, on CR-friendly meal replacements. Stay tuned...

 

The diet and other health/exercise regimens are all in the daily background.  In many ways, CR is boring ;)  Even the science is boring because, frankly, I don't see a whole lot of ground-breaking action**  -- even in LE in general.

----------------------

** CR, in many ways, is like pop research. The sheer volume of CR-related papers Al posts seems to indicate this. It's tried n' tested science; and getting the results YOU WANT/EXPECT is an effective way to ensure grants/funding -- a cash cow. The politics of science, funding and academia are complex. Maybe someone needs to write and publish a book called The Trouble With Life Extension ( a play on Lee Smolin's 2006 The Trouble With Physics)

 

That's a healthy perspective and what I figured would be the case for many long-time CR practitioners like yourself. Your CR practice eventually becomes automatic and part of the background of your life.

 

And I agree that it is hard to see where progress in CR research can/will go from here, particularly about the relevance for people now that the Wisconsin/NIA primate CR studies have been published, other than trying to elucidate mechanisms and develop mimetics.

 

But in case you didn't notice, I draw your attention to a topic I'm particularly interested in at the moment that I think may be quite relevant to the human practice of CR - namely the significance, and potentially even necessity, of cold exposure in conjunction with CR for CR to have longevity benefits.

 

Metaphysics and "new spiritualites" have been new sources of interest:

https://www.youtube.com/user/scienceandnonduality

TED talks and Talks@Google (youtube channel) can also be interesting.

 

Fascinating - I too have been exploring spirituality via YouTube recently, and have watched most of the Science and Non-duality videos you point to, along with most of the videos from Buddha at the Gas Pump and ConsciousTV. I'm amused by the irreverence of Tony Parsons and appreciate Adyashanti as well. I also highly recommend Closer to Truth and Big Think YouTube channels for those who are interested in big questions but not so much in spirituality.

 

Lately (besides health & longevity reading / research), I've found myself gravitating more towards philosophy than spirituality, particularly metaphysics and ethics - Epictetus, Spinoza, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, John Stewart Mill, John Rawls, Peter Singer, are especially interesting to me. I can't recommend this Harvard course on Justice by Michael Sandel highly enough.

 

Bottom line: 120 years is still too short. And, in any case, I can imagine myself getting bored in the same old physical world no matter how long physical life was extended.

 

I agree. There is so much to learn and contemplate, I too find the "life of the mind" much more interesting to contemplate and explore than the physical world. But as you've recognized, we have to take care of the body in order to make a contemplative life possible...

 

Great hearing about what you've been up to!

 

--Dean

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I'm not on CR, either. Maybe they all died. Maybe CR was a really terrible idea for scrawny little earthy folks. Or maybe they went mute. They got so hungry they ate their own words. CR coulda enlightened them, dig it, and so they've transcended far, far away from us. Distant realms and shit... They could have formed their own secret forum, or forCRum, and since none of us are actually practicing CR anymore, well, we just suck. Boo. Maybe they went "underground" -- you know -- like naked mole rats. These shall live really long, long lives and never get cancer, etc, etc

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Dean,

 

My impression of the website and forums could merely reflect my obtuseness. There might be great value here that I have overlooked.

 

I keep tabs on the forums mostly because I like the way you think and write.

 

I have not found much in the way of actionable advice or guidelines here. I don't have the capacity to digest voluminous and intricate research reports and derive practical guidelines.

 

Allow me to make a facetious comment pertaining to the way scientific studies might be used to alter one's behavior:

 

I might train my body to sleep on the right side. After 40 years, I find out that the benefits are only derived from sleeping on the left side.

 

Of course there are some conclusions from research so convincing that most of us have altered our behavior, but in general I don't do anything that doesn't come naturally to me.

 

At this point I will note exceptions to my contention that there is little actionable information: the excellent advice I received on the forums to use CRON-O-METER software, and your list of vegan supplements.

 

This has been the biggest change in my practice.

 

Otherwise, I'm just plodding along doing what I've been doing for over 40 years.

 

I haven't bothered with doctors or blood tests, so I accept that I might be doomed and just don't know it. I accept that risk.

 

It helps that I'm not concerned about longevity. I follow a CR regimen because it makes me feel good and satisfies a strong ascetic tendency that seems inbuilt (as does a vegan compulsion).

 

Zeta wrote:

Of course, I'm not really on CR right now...

 

Of course, many would say I'm not either, if you look at my raw calorie intake and ignore my net energy balance and weight/BMI.

 

 

Dean, you follow a high calorie/high exercise program, and I follow a low calorie/low exercise program. So there would seem to be few practices of yours I would adopt. Yet I have paid attention to your vegan supplementation recommendations, and I simply find it interesting to follow what you are doing.

 

It seems ironic (and rather sad), that the two most active members of these CR Forums are not actually practicing CR, by the strict definition of the term. I wonder why that is, and particularly why the CR veterans that we know lurk on these forums from the CR demographics survey results won't seem to participate in the discussions.

 

I can think of several possibilities:

 

CR is simply another part of their life, so fully integrated and natural they don't care to talk about it, or to socialize with other like-minded individuals on topics of health and longevity on these forums.

 

What I do *appears* to work for me, but nobody should want to emulate my practice.

 

The socializing part might account for why I continue to respond to forum posts. That's as close to socializing as I get.

 

If alone-ness (not loneliness) were bad for longevity, I'd really be a goner.

 

But I agree with Sthira, that we hermits sometimes seem to have surprising longevity. I am curious whether I'll roll sixes or snake eyes. Time will tell.

 

They are simply too busy to bother contributing to the discussions.

 

I wonder if such busy people can derive anything useful from forum discussions. Maybe it is entertaining discussion even if not actionable.

 

They are somewhat selfish - content to absorb the information shared on these forums, but unwilling to contribute to it.

 

They must be absorbing info that I am too obtuse to see the use of. The info is interesting, but not useful to me.

 

They are too private to feel comfortable sharing, although this one seems unlikely given how easy it is to remain anonymous if one wishes.

 

I have no reservations about sharing details of my practice, but why should anyone want to know what I do? Like I said, my regimen is based on my intuitions and inbuilt quirks.

 

They don't have the energy to engage in the lively discussions we have. :)xyz

 

They show admirable restraint, not adding useless quips and opinions to posts by diligent and better-informed contributors. Think of them as spectators with the good manners not to blurt out worthless reactions. Or think of them as your bashful fans.

 

They think they've heard it all before, and all we're doing is rehashing things they (think they) already know about CR, and health/longevity in general.

 

I have not "heard it all before" when it comes to the studies discussed in the forums. I skim the research summaries out of interest, but the results don't translate into behavior change.

 

There are no 'true believers' anymore in the human longevity benefits of CR in the strictest sense of the concept, or perhaps more accurately, the benefits don't seem worth the costs, and so everyone has moved towards different strategies for maximizing health/longevity, and don't feel the need to talk about it here.

 

I follow a CR regimen because it makes me feel best. I doubt that my practice will translate into impressive longevity. Probably I've been sleeping on the wrong side most of my life.

 

I'd be very interested in hearing other CR veterans' answer to why they aren't more active here.

 

You have contributed so much that interests me, that I hope this post is of interest to you.

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Greg,

 

Thanks for your detailed response! I have several questions / comments for you.

 

You wrote:

I have not found much in the way of actionable advice or guidelines here.

 

Huh? At least it appeared you were going to modify your diet in several significant ways as a result of some of these discussions. The hazards of a fruitarian diet thread seemed like it had some reasonable, actionable advice you at least said you were inclined to adopt. No?

 

Of course there are some conclusions from research so convincing that most of us have altered our behavior, but in general I don't do anything that doesn't come naturally to me.

 

Ah - the naturalistic fallacy. You do know it's natural for humans to eat meat, and it's natural for humans to grow fast, raise a lot of kids, and die young? In short, we've been finding ways to improve on what comes naturally to us for eons. You're welcome to ignore what we've learned from these experiments, but then you've got to be prepared to live with the consequences. Which, to your credit, you seem prepared (resigned?) to do:

 

I haven't bothered with doctors or blood tests, so I accept that I might be doomed and just don't know it. I accept that risk.

 

That's obviously your prerogative. But its not the choice that many other people involved with CR have made.

 

 

Dean, you follow a high calorie/high exercise program, and I follow a low calorie/low exercise program. So there would seem to be few practices of yours I would adopt. Yet I have paid attention to your vegan supplementation recommendations, and I simply find it interesting to follow what you are doing.

 

That is exactly what I'm hoping, and why I try to be so transparent on these forums. The purpose I've chosen for myself is to explore a region of the space of human possibilities that not many others have visited, and document how my experiment works out, so that others may be amused by, and hopefully learn from my experience. Perhaps they'll even adjust their own way of living, either to adopt some of what I've done, or give my approach to living a wide berth if I crash and burn...

 

The socializing part might account for why I continue to respond to forum posts. That's as close to socializing as I get.

 

These forums are a main source of my own socialization as well. That's why I appreciate engaging with people like yourself Greg, with a different and interesting perspective.

 

I have no reservations about sharing details of my practice, but why should anyone want to know what I do? Like I said, my regimen is based on my intuitions and inbuilt quirks.

 

Greg, you sell yourself short. Each one of us has something to teach the rest of us - if nothing else but to serve as a dire warning about what not to do if one wants to live a long/health/happy life.  :)xyz

 

They show admirable restraint, not adding useless quips and opinions to posts by diligent and better-informed contributors.

 

Honestly Greg, for socializing reasons, I'd rather have so called 'useless' quips than silence on these forums. Case in point - I love Sthira's irreverent contributions. And while I almost always disagree with Saul (since his comments are usually grounded only by his personal biases - sorry Saul), I miss him during his long hiatuses. 

 

I follow a CR regimen because it makes me feel best. I doubt that my practice will translate into impressive longevity. Probably I've been sleeping on the wrong side most of my life.

 

Given the uncertainty of CR benefits, both in general and for any single individual (who might get hit but a bus any time), that is a very healthy attitude, which I share. If I didn't find my practice (I won't dare call it CR, since I'm clearly getting more than the RDA of calories, so Michael would almost certainly object to such muddying of the waters...) gratifying and worthwhile in the here and now, I wouldn't pursue it either.

 

You have contributed so much that interests me, that I hope this post is of interest to you. 

 

Definitely. Thanks again for sharing, and for bringing your unique perspective to these forums. I wish you would interject more often!

 

--Dean

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Greg,

 

Thanks for your detailed response! I have several questions / comments for you.

 

You wrote:

I have not found much in the way of actionable advice or guidelines here.

 

Huh? At least it appeared you were going to modify your diet in several significant ways as a result of some of these discussions. The hazards of a fruitarian diet thread seemed like it had some reasonable, actionable advice you at least said you were inclined to adopt. No?

 

 

Yes Dean, I am a backslider. The alterations to my regimen didn't "take" or "stick". I got sick of nuts, for one thing.

 

So the only behavior change I am aware of is the use of CRON-O-METER and my taking many of the vegan supplements on "the Dean's list".

 

I was already drinking coffee, so all the research on the benefits of coffee consumption don't matter to me. Anyway, I'll probably find out that the benefits don't accrue to someone drinking my coffee, or my coffee prepared the way I do it.

 

 

 

Of course there are some conclusions from research so convincing that most of us have altered our behavior, but in general I don't do anything that doesn't come naturally to me.

 

Ah - the naturalistic fallacy. You do know it's natural for humans to eat meat,...

 

 

This raises the question of what is "natural". Among humans, is eating meat more natural than smoking tobacco? I read that 92% of Chinese men smoke, so it would appear to be as natural as eating meat in America. Or is there more to it than prevalence?

 

I could never tolerate alcohol, and eating meat never appealed to me. Veganism is effortless and seems nearly instinctive. Is that quirk "unnatural"?

 

...and it's natural for humans to grow fast, raise a lot of kids, and die young? In short, we've been finding ways to improve on what comes naturally to us for eons. You're welcome to ignore what we've learned from these experiments, ...

 

I'm missing your point here. What "experiments" do you mean? I'm all for sanitation that promotes health and longevity, quarantine of the infected. Is that what you mean by experiments that offset the "natural" tendency to die young?

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One thing that does occur to me is that those who are on 'extreme CR', or have been in the past, really do sort of 'owe it to the group' to keep in touch at least periodically.  The rest of us will greatly benefit from knowing how they are doing.  What is the current health status of the small number of people who have, or had, BMIs below 18, below 17, below 16?

 

Are they in unimaginably good heallth and look on track to live to 160?  Or are they no longer alive, or suffering some specific problem from which we can all learn?  Would they not want the results of their experiment to be shared with everyone?  I do hope, as a minor example, that my 'much too low dietary fat' experiment can help those considering trying something similar.  I am not aware of any lasting negative effects of that, incidentally

 

Rodney.

Edited by nicholson

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I apologize for being irreverent, even if you, Dean, say you've enjoyed that aspect of me. I had to look up the word irreverent, and it means disrespectful. And I certainly do not mean any disrespect to your prodigious and frankly overwhelming research and writing, Dean. I guess I've written disrespectfully not on purpose, but rather because I'm floored by the amount of time, attention, and care you express here. You have my profound respect -- but I'm just not very good at expressing myself. I was attempting to add lightness, levity, humor -- but comedy is best left to professionals, I think. I'll try to tamp down my disrespect, Dean.

 

I practiced severe CR for two or three years. I lost so much weight, got so weak, felt so miserable, cold, ugly, freakish, isolated from friends and family, that I had to let it go. I let it go right around the time the Wisconsin studies came out. It felt right to lose it then. But I'm still flirting with CR. I fast a lot. But I honestly don't know if anything will slow the ravages of aging beyond advancing technologies like SENS or CRISPR gene editing, or whatever's next. At best, I think, CR may give us good health if practiced from an early age and diligently. But I don't expect to live much longer than my genetic inheritance. Unless we can discover how to tinker with genes. Which seems far away. But I don't know.

Edited by Sthira

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I apologize for being irreverent, even if you, Dean, say you've enjoyed that aspect of me. I had to look up the word irreverent, and it means disrespectful. And I certainly do not mean any disrespect to your prodigious and frankly overwhelming research and writing, Dean. I guess I've written disrespectfully not on purpose, but rather because I'm floored by the amount of time, attention, and care you express here. You have my profound respect -- but I'm just not very good at expressing myself. I was attempting to add lightness, levity, humor -- but comedy is best left to professionals, I think. I'll try to tamp down my disrespect, Dean.

Sthira,

 

Don't be hard on yourself. I'd bet Dean meant it like "saucy" or "cheeky", something like this ad hoc "definition":

 

taking things less seriously than the stuffed shirts do, in a way that is regarded as entertaining or amusing;

 

In other words, nobody felt disrespected, and you are more amusing than offensive. No worries.

 

I practiced severe CR for two or three years. I lost so much weight, got so weak, felt so miserable, cold, ugly, freakish, isolated from friends and family, that I had to let it go. I let it go right around the time the Wisconsin studies came out. It felt right to lose it then. But I'm still flirting with CR. I fast a lot. But I honestly don't know if anything will slow the ravages of aging beyond advancing technologies like SENS or CRISP gene editing, or whatever's next. At best, I think, CR may give us good health if practiced from an early age and diligently. But I don't expect to live much longer than my genetic inheritance. Unless we can discover how to tinker with genes. Which seems far away. But I don't know.

That is interesting. I too don't expect to live longer than my genetic program dictates. All I am doing is avoiding an undue shortening of my potential by abusing my body through overeating or other harmful treatment.

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Aye, thanks Greg for the good words. I'll echo Dean's request that you post here more often. From what you've written I feel like I've stuff in common with you, and it's fun to make hermit connections. This forum is a budding little start-up community, driven passionately by Dean, and it may need warmth. While I love reading the hard science, I don't always understand how it's at all practical. Perhaps like you, I read stuff here but don't really see how the tentative and fragile (mousy) conclusions reached, then retracted, then re-asserted, then taken back by contrary data -- this halting, jerky forward and backward -- I don't see how it's helping me to be healthier. But then again I'd like to discover what it takes to achieve escape velocity, and maybe part of that's here in CRville.

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Hi Greg,

 

I'm a bit (but not too) sorry to hear that some of the what-I-believe-to-be-good advice you received hasn't 'stuck'. But by adopting judicious supplementing of a few key nutrients, I suspect (and hope!) you're covering your health bases more completely than you were before.  

 

And beyond not (obviously) shooting oneself in the foot, I'm all for experimentation to see what works and what doesn't - especially if people are willing & able to stick with their chosen 'program' and (importantly) share the results of their experiment(s) with the rest of us. To wit:

 

 ...and it's natural for humans to grow fast, raise a lot of kids, and die young? In short, we've been finding ways to improve on what comes naturally to us for eons. You're welcome to ignore what we've learned from these experiments, ...

 
I'm missing your point here. What "experiments" do you mean? I'm all for sanitation that promotes health and longevity, quarantine of the infected. Is that what you mean by experiments that offset the "natural" tendency to die young?

 

Yes, sort of. Let me explain.

 

We are all performing experiments every day, through the ways we chose to live. People who eat a crappy American diet are one more test case in the experiment to see just how bad for health & longevity it is to drink fructose sweetened soda, eat twinkies and crispy bacon - as if we needed another test case to prove this...

 

You are running an experiment on yourself to see how a mostly fruit-based, low-fat, low-calorie vegan diet accompanied by little exercise works out in the long run.

 

I'm running my own experiment, exploring how a relatively high-calorie, vegan, mostly raw, moderate fat diet accompanied by a buttload of exercise and (recently) cold exposure in order to remain thin and to boost hormesis works out in the long run.

 

Michael Rae (sorry Michael if I mischaracterize your experiment) is running his own experiment to see how a low-calorie, mostly-vegetarian, moderately-high-fat (mostly from premium EVOO) diet and a moderate amount of exercise works out in the long run.

 

We can each learn from, and build upon the experiments of others who've come before us. Or we can choose to ignore prior experiments and strike out on our own. It's good in my book to try something new and unusual - it helps populate the vast space of possibilities yet to be explored for how to live a human life.

 

But what I was saying in the above passage you quoted is that simply striking out on one's own by doing what seems 'natural' based on one's own intuition risks ignoring the helpful information available from the experiences of other travellers who've been down the same road before.

 

In short there is a lot of collective (and collected) wisdom available to intelligently guide one's personal experiments to maximize the possibility of flourishing, and by doing so add to the collective wisdom and educate the rest of us about new and interesting possible ways of living.

 

As for life's ultimate purpose like we're discussing on the other thread, it seems to me that engaging in such an experiment with earnestness, integrity and transparency is not a bad way to proceed, while we're passing the time waiting for the inevitable "other shoe to drop".

 

--Dean

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I apologize for being irreverent, even if you, Dean, say you've enjoyed that aspect of me. I had to look up the word irreverent, and it means disrespectful. And I certainly do not mean any disrespect to your prodigious and frankly overwhelming research and writing, Dean. I guess I've written disrespectfully not on purpose, but rather because I'm floored by the amount of time, attention, and care you express here. You have my profound respect -- but I'm just not very good at expressing myself. I was attempting to add lightness, levity, humor -- but comedy is best left to professionals, I think. I'll try to tamp down my disrespect, Dean.

 

No Sthira. You've totally misinterpreted the meaning of my (perhaps inappropriately-chosen) use of the word 'irreverant'. I meant it exactly as Greg characterized it when he said:

 

I'd bet Dean meant it like "saucy" or "cheeky", something like this ad hoc "definition":

 

taking things less seriously than the stuffed shirts do, in a way that is regarded as entertaining or amusing;

In other words, nobody felt disrespected, and you are more amusing than offensive. No worries.

 

Thanks Greg for expressing it so eloquently. Sthira, the lightness and humor that you bring to the forums is tremendously helpful and refreshing. We (especially me) do tend to get lost in the minutia, and your input is extremely useful for helping keep things in perspective and not taking ourselves or our ideas too seriously. 

 

Please keep it up rather than tone it down.

 

Sthira wrote:

But I honestly don't know if anything will slow the ravages of aging beyond advancing technologies like SENS or CRISPR gene editing, or whatever's next. At best, I think, CR may give us good health if practiced from an early age and diligently. But I don't expect to live much longer than my genetic inheritance. Unless we can discover how to tinker with genes. Which seems far away. But I don't know.

 

I agree completely. We're all just trying to hang on the best we can, hoping that sooner rather than later a real anti-aging technology will come along and that we'll still be in good enough shape to benefit from it.

 

In the meantime we might as well amuse ourselves with our individual pursuits, and engaging in enjoyable interactions with other like-minded individuals with a diverse set of perspectives, like we're trying to cultivate here.  Thanks to both of you for being part of the club!

 

--Dean

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Just a quick "Hello!" to Khurram. Good to hear you are -- or certainly seem to be -- doing well.

 

Your thoughts about the background nature of your CR, and about the boring nature of much recent CR research make sense. (Though I'm not sure I'd say most CR research is boring -- there's a lot of cool research going on; but you're right about the consequences of the funding treadmill: a lot of research has conclusions like: "And it works in species X, as well.")

 

It's time humanity made more progress on the general healthspan-increase goal!

 

Brian

 

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