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Sthira

Unfolding Liz Parrish

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I'm positive y'all are keeping up with what she's doing. How can we not? Even if I see some wagging virtual fingers in my mind in this crowd, nevertheless, she's out there taking a risk, attempting to move shiz forward, you know all about her. And so I respect opinions here, and am genuinely curious to hear some erudite chit chat about her self-commitment. She recently gave a second interview to that guy I like Socrates who has Singularity on his mind:

 

https://www.singularityweblog.com/category/podcasts/

 

Please don't hold back your opinions. First to taint the waters, my own opinion is she flipping rocks and I wish her the very best.

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Sthira,

 

Thanks for posting this new interview with Liz Parrish. I'd just finished watching it and was considering posting it myself but you beat me to it!

 

I too admire her a lot for her willingness to experiment, and to go out on a limb for a worthwhile cause.

 

But I have to say I didn't think she was at her best in this interview. She came off at times as pretty flaky to me, particularly in the section about knowing how she was going to die, and now, after this treatment, she may not. I first interpreted this, as Nikola did, as her thinking she knew the cause of her future death (i.e. some particular disease or malady). What I guess she really might have meant was that death is inevitable, but now with these two gene therapy treatments death may not be inevitable for her now?! I'm not sure. Either way it seemed like pretty flaky and scattered thinking to me...

 

And while I mean no ill-will towards her, I wish she were in a bit worse shape than she is, so there might be a real hope of seeing significant improvement in her subjective appearance of health, or her biomarkers, to demonstrate something tangible and positive as a result of the two stem cell treatments she underwent. Plus I wish she had a credible plan to demonstrate benefits/changes as a result of the treatments, or could/would share the details of the more credible plan she may already have.

 

Overall she continued to be more vague and cagey about the details of the experiment and its results so far than I would like.

 

But again I admire the heck out of her willingness to go out on a limb for a cause she obviously feels strongly about and that I share, namely the desire to defeat aging.

 

--Dean

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Very important topic, but a preliminary, general question: does anyone know how to get a transcript of podcasts (and, for that matter, YouTube videos, etc.)? I like text. I don't have an hour to listen to this. Today's technology won't result in a perfect transcrip, of course. But even a messy text mass would be helpful.

 

Thanks,

Zeta

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Zeta,

 

 

Very important topic, but a preliminary, general question: does anyone know how to get a transcript of podcasts (and, for that matter, YouTube videos, etc.)? I like text.

 

First, here is a 20min version of the same Liz Parrish video, edited for brevity, and embedded here for your efficient enjoyment:

 

 

Regarding transcripts, there does appear to be a way to do it for YouTube videos. I haven't tried it. Let us know if it works.

 

--Dean

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Thanks, Dean. Your suggested solution looks promising but is a bit too complicated for me to try right now (have to get back to work). I did try VoiceBase, though. Here's the raw result (of the free version):

 

Liz Parrish interview.

 

VoiceBase's main function is actually keyword generation, for use in locating parts of a recording you might be interested in. That would help, too!

 

The few bits of the interview I caught while experimenting with VoiceBase lead me to confirm my previous conclusion about her: She's very brave, and has a good heart. But, Dean, I agree with your criticisms (from what I saw in this interview). In particular, I'd really like to see what concrete plan exists for assessing the efficacy of the treatments. I'd be surprised if there weren't one. Of course, this could be merely a safety study (like a Phase 1 trial), but even with Phase 1 trials, researchers keep a keen eye on more than mere safety.

 

Zeta

Edited by Zeta

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I think her "concrete plan" is unfolding. And I believe it'll take less time to unfold than results from more mouse studies, or more FDA dithering, or more conservative-science handwringing. Much of what's passing for "science" in this field is academics securing reputations and publishing rather than perishing. She represents an alternative. She's disruptive.

 

As for flakiness regarding her death, my take is she already knows how she'll die in the same way everyone generally already knows how we'll die: cancer, CVD, Alzheimers... We don't know which disgusting horror will seize the tail and drag us into long rots in six-foot graves, but we know one disease or another will do it. Now that she's undergone X she may die unconventionally. She may die of some unpredicted cause tomorrow or next week or in three years or whatever, or she may live a very long time. That's my take anyway.

 

I like that she's disrupting the status quo -- even if she fails and dies tomorrow -- at least she tried to do something rather than wait for another mouse paper.

 

I really don't see her as "brave." We're all going to die anyway -- why not step out onto a ledge where few dare? We're all gonna die -- do somethibg about it -- that's what she's saying to me.

 

Another thing I like is her evident transparency. I'm sure people all over the world -- aging billionaires -- are also doing unconventional stuff to try to stop their deaths. And these research organizations sprouting up -- small, medium and big research companies are also doing stuff -- but we don't know much about what any of these folks are doing because they're silent and secretive. Huh Calico? If they're advancing in solving aging, we don't hear about it. Here's a person not only stepping out onto a disruptive, controversial ledge, but also offering it up publicly for all to see and criticize openly. Who else is doing anything, said the crickets.

Edited by Sthira

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I really don't see her as "brave." We're all going to die anyway -- why not step out onto a ledge where few dare?

 

Answer: Because there's a difference between dying in a few months, and dying in a few decades. It's that difference that warrants the assessment "brave". I gather you think the difference is irrelevant. Not I!

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^^^ Well yeah, semantics, I guess. Are world explorers "brave" when they undergo expeditions to places unconventional people wouldn't dare? Or are we just built differently? I guess we could say it was brave of Magellan to take off for the edge of the Earth where everyone said his ship would fall off. He did it anyway because looking around at everyone around him he knew everything would just stay the same unless someone ventured out to test the edge. I doubt Parrish herself sees herself as brave. Maybe I'm wrong, but I think she sees this ridiculous fact that a hundred thousand people die (or whatever the number) of diseases in which many of the solutions are already in the can but are inaccessible. Or people are suffering of diseases in which experimental stuff could be tried -- yet they're gonna die anyway never having had the opportunity to have tried sailing out to the world's edge. Semantics -- but I don't see her as brave because she may be giving up four decades of a more-of-same life..

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http://www.technologyreview.com/news/542371/a-tale-of-do-it-yourself-gene-therapy/

 

A Tale of Do-It-Yourself Gene Therapy

An American biotech CEO claims she is the first to undergo gene therapy to reverse aging. Judge for yourself.

 
WHY IT MATTERS

The human species may eventually extend the average life span via genetic modification.

Longevityx299.jpg

Can aging be slowed by using gene therapy to make permanent changes to a person’s DNA?

One Seattle-area woman says she has tried exactly that. Her claim has entangled some high-profile American academics in a strange tale of do-it-yourself medicine that involves plane flights to Latin America, an L.A. film crew, and what’s purported to be the first attempt to use gene therapy to forestall normal aging.

Elizabeth Parrish, the 44-year-old CEO of a biotechnology startup called BioViva, says she underwent a gene therapy at an undisclosed location overseas last month, a first step in what she says is a plan to develop treatments for ravages of old age like Alzheimer’s and muscle loss. “I am patient zero,” she declared during a Q&A on the website Reddit on Sunday. “I have aging as a disease.”

Since last week, MIT Technology Review has attempted to independently verify the accuracy of Parrish’s claims, particularly how she obtained the genetic therapy. While many key details could not be confirmed, people involved with her company said the medical procedure took place September 15 in Colombia.

The experiment seems likely to be remembered as either a new low in medical quackery or, perhaps, the unlikely start of an era in which people receive genetic modifications not just to treat disease, but to reverse aging. It also raises ethical questions about how quickly such treatments should be tested in people and whether they ought to be developed outside the scrutiny of regulators. The field of anti-aging research is known for attracting a mix of serious scientists, vitamin entrepreneurs, futurists, and cranks peddling various paths to immortality, including brain freezing.

Parrish’s assertions set off a scramble among members of her company’s scientific advisory board to understand what had occurred. One distanced himself from the company. “This is a big problem,” says George Martin, a professor at the University of Washington and the former scientific director of the American Federation of Aging Research. He says he’d agreed to advise Parrish several months ago but resigned his role over the weekend. “I am very upset by what is happening. I would urge lots of preclinical studies,” he says.

Although she lacks formal scientific training, over the last two years Parrish has emerged as an enthusiastic spokesperson for the life-extension movement on blogs and podcasts. According to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 27, she’d raised $250,000 for BioViva, which lists a modest two-bedroom home outside Seattle as its headquarters. Her LinkedIn profile lists a work history going back six years, including administrative roles at software companies.

Parrish said in an interview she chose to bypass the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by trying the procedure overseas. The FDA requires costly trials, and aging itself is not generally recognized as a disease that can be addressed by drugs. “What we did is we moved forward to try to treat biological aging,” Parrish says. “We are attempting to reverse aging at a biological level.”

Her claims appear to raise the possibility of a market in overseas medical tourism for unproven genetic therapies. Gene-therapy preparations, which use a virus to shuttle DNA into human cells, could prove risky. But the technology has advanced so far in the last decade that it is within reach of a small company.

Another prominent science advisor listed by BioViva is Harvard Medical School genomics expert George Church, who includes BioViva in a list on his website ofaround 100 companies he collaborates with. Church said last week he was also trying to learn what exactly had occurred in Latin America. “I think it is real,” he said in an interview. “There were some indications it might happen. Companies in stealth mode can do anything they want.”

Church says he didn’t agree with dodging regulators and added that BioViva appears to be “a one-person show.” But he says he found Parrish’s claims plausible. A student in his lab, he says, could prepare a genetic treatment suitable for experiments in animals in a matter of days.

Parrish says she had received two forms of gene therapy produced under contract with a commercial laboratory, which she did not identify, outside the United States. In one treatment, she says, she received injections into her muscles containing the gene follistatin, which in animal experiments is shown to increase muscle mass by blocking myostatin, itself an inhibitor of muscle growth. She says she also received an intravenous dose of viruses containing genetic material to produce telomerase, a protein that extends telomeres, a component of chromosomes known as the “aging clock.” Telomerase is a frequent target of anti-aging research because the molecule is present in cells that can continue to divide indefinitely, like stem cells and tumors.

BioViva appears to have taken its inspiration, and its basic genetic recipes, from research published by mainstream labs. The idea for extending life span using telomerase, for instance, is based on work by the laboratory of Maria Blasco, a Spanish scientist who in 2012 showed that telomerase gene therapy could extend the life span of mice by as much as 20 percent.

Parrish says the second treatment she received was “very similar” to a study of a follistatin gene therapy under way in boys with muscular dystrophy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Details of that technique have been published in scientific journals.

Church, the Harvard professor, says he thinks targeted DNA changes could in fact extend the normal human life span, which has a maximum length of about 120 years. Earlier this month, at a meeting of the National Academy of Sciences organized to weigh policy on genetic interventions, Church proposed telomerase as one bearing serious consideration. “I think we are very close. I think the world is close, so long as we don’t have a setback,” he says. “The extension of life span is quite dramatic in model organisms … it would be amazing in humans.”

Parrish is described as very effective at signing up others to join her efforts, despite her lack of medical expertise. “It’s hard to say no to her. She is so charming. She gets a foot in the door,” says Michael Fossell, an entrepreneur and doctor who recently started his own gene-therapy company, Telocyte, to work with telomerase to treat Alzheimer’s.

One current collaborator on the BioViva project is Jason Williams, a radiologist who has attracted scrutiny for offering unlicensed stem-cell treatments to patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. Williams says he ceased providing those treatments in the United States in 2013, after the FDA asked him to stop, saying they required agency approval. Williams later established a clinic in Bogotá, Colombia.

In an interview, Williams said he was a co-owner of BioViva and had assigned rights in a patent to the company. He said the treatment had occurred in Colombia, although not at his clinic. Both he and Parrish declined to name the doctor involved; Parrish would not confirm the country where it took place.

MIT Technology Review attempted to confirm aspects of Parrish’s story, in part by speaking to Matthew Andrews, a Los Angeles filmmaker who said he filmed Parrish’s treatment in September inside a modestly equipped doctor’s office, where she was attended by one doctor and one nurse, who also collected blood tests. “It was a procedure room, not a lot of high-tech gadgets. She was lying on the bed, awake, receiving the injections and connected to an IV,” he said. “It was uneventful from a spectator’s point of view, though I don’t know what was going on inside the body when it happened.”

Matthew Scholz, CEO of Immusoft, a venture-capital-backed startup planning an FDA study of a gene therapy for a metabolic disorder, says Parrish’s claims might inspire enthusiastic amateurs to try to modify their own DNA, or someone else’s, thereby “shifting the balance of power to patients.”

For instance, Scholz, who says he also offered Parrish technical advice, says that during the Ebola outbreak he was able to quickly and cheaply carry out a test of a gene therapy in monkeys, so their bodies would produce an antibody against the virus. “It makes you ask, what if you could do gene therapy in the garage?” he says. Scholz says he did not have advance knowledge of Parrish’s plans to carry out an actual treatment.

Parrish says she did not seek approval from anyone to carry out the experiment. In the U.S., medical research is typically approved by boards including medical ethicists. “We as a company have our own ethics,” she says, referring to what she calls the need for inexpensive gene therapy treatments. “I am certainly not going to ask someone’s permission to potentially create new industries and cures.”

Fossell, the anti-aging entrepreneur, says even if Parrish were to somehow succeed in slowing the aging of her body, an outcome he rated as unlikely, the experiment would have no impact because of how it was carried out. “The problem is that no one is going to believe them,” he says. “The credibility will be zero even if they are right on the money.”

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Fossell, the anti-aging entrepreneur, says even if Parrish were to somehow succeed in slowing the aging of her body, an outcome he rated as unlikely, the experiment would have no impact because of how it was carried out. “The problem is that no one is going to believe them,” he says. “The credibility will be zero even if they are right on the money.”[/size][/font]

That's so funny. Like he even believes that. If Parrish even remotely demonstrates that she's "slowed aging" via whatever she's done, the line for similar gene treatments will only be about -- oh -- a billion miles long in spite of what the establishment cautions...

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Sthira,

 

If Parrish even remotely demonstrates that she's "slowed aging" via whatever she's done, the line for similar gene treatments will only be about -- oh -- a billion miles long in spite of what the establishment cautions...

 

I'm far from sure of that. They only evidence she could possibly claim for "slowed aging" would be measureable extension of her telomeres. But as even she acknowledges, there is a significant chance of increased cancer risk as a result of telomere lengthening, making it a dubious gamble for younger people who might theoretically benefit from longer telomeres (although even that is very questionable). And people who are very aged and close to death, and desperately willing to take the risk, are very unlikely to benefit from telomere lengthening. The other treatment, to preserve muscle mass, will be very hard to prove given that

  1. Muscle mass is influenced by exercise
  2. She acknowledges she exercises a lot
  3. The study isn't blind - she knows she got the treatment and is very motivated to demonstrate these treatments have some benefit

In short, if she gains some muscle mass it would seem virtually impossible to know if the treatment was responsible for the increase.

 

So I for one wouldn't be tempted to line up for either treatment, even if she and her team claim victory. Nevertheless I admire her for trying to do something about aging.

 

--Dean

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So I for one wouldn't be tempted to line up for either treatment, even if she and her team claim victory.

 

Dean, nothing you wrote speaks against Sthira's point, for the simple reason that you belong to a tiny cognitive and biology-aware extreme elite. If one adds or subtracts even all the people in the 99.9+th percentile of smarts and research knowledge from the billion-mile long line, it's still more or less a billion miles long. All Parrish needs to do is, say, show a video clip from before the procedure where she's obviously maxing out bench-pressing 60 kg, then show a clip post-procedure pressing 75 or 80, and the line will be ... long. (And she'll get tons of funding, and will thus be able to do more research, more serious research, ergo.... Is a noble lie warranted? Is that what she's thinking?)

 

Zeta

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Maybe it's a noble lie, or maybe not; maybe it's a sucker's game, or maybe not. You agree that longevity science needs more money in order to achieve specific goals. And it's clear that until some demonstrable, obvious progress "happens" that resonates publicly -- like, may she magically transform in self and on YouTube from 44 to 24 -- money may stay where it is now: constipated.

 

And don't forget that we're all self-experimenters, too, even if you may think you may "belong to a tiny cognitive and biology-aware extreme elite." CR in humans? So it's a question of degree and target. We're careful with "...there's a new one born every minute..." because reading through some of these posts, cirque cases can be made here, too.

Edited by Sthira

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Sthira,

 

Agreed - we're all going out on a limb through our experiments. That's what a flourishing life is about, as we've discussed elsewhere. So I admire Liz and hope she succeeds in spurring interest and investment in longevity research. I just worry about people getting hurt by unsubstantiated claims and overselling of results. She certainly can't be accused of that so far - but she has a lot to gain personally from doing so in the future. So we'll see how it plays out.

 

--Dean

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Of course people are going to get hurt anyway, and of course people are going to die anyway. Right on schedule. Conservative American thinking is fashionable and pervasive. People have gotten really litigious and wimpy: have we lost gutsy (sometimes reckless and stupid) pioneer spirit? We're dying anyway. Our medicine approaches are too slow. Some gene therapies are so far down the road, they're worth giving to sick people for the fair opportunity to gamble with them. You agree. But how about for healthy young people? If I want to rappel up and down the side of yonder wild Alaskan cliff -- it's dangerous and cold (!) -- but I'm taking a calculated risk, and I'm doing it. Same should hold for experimental medicine: we are gonna be dying soon anyway.

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And don't forget that we're all self-experimenters, too, even if you may think you may "belong to a tiny cognitive and biology-aware extreme elite."

 

Just a "for the record" point: I (I assume you mean me by "you") was referring only to Dean, not to myself. (Though, to be sure, I would indeed make such a claim, arrogation or not, about my healthy, non-sleep-deprived self.)

 

Yes, we're all experimenters. Michael, thinking, I believe, of the non-elite (a term he himself might reject), used to emphasize this about CR (even a few years ago, before the monkey data made him a bit less positive about CR's prospects): ~"You're doing an extreme experiment on yourselves people when you do CR!"

 

But experimentation is good!

Edited by Zeta

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Well that didn't take long - Liz Parrish is now claiming victory, in this new article posted to the Bioviva website.

 

In it they claim independent tests show her leukocytes telomeres have been lengthened:

 

In September 2015, telomere data taken from Parrish’s white blood cells by SpectraCell‘s specialised clinical testing laboratory in Houston, Texas, immediately before therapies were administered, revealed that Parrish’s telomeres were unusually short for her age, leaving her vulnerable to age-associated diseases earlier in life.
 
In March 2016, the same tests were taken again by SpectraCell revealed that her telomeres had lengthened by approximately 20 years, from 6.71kb to 7.33kb. This implies that Parrish’s white blood cells (leukocytes) have become biologically younger. 
 
I'm not sure that last statement is warranted, but it is nice to see that the treatment apparently did have some effect - it would have been really disappointing if it hadn't. 
 
It will be interesting to see what happens to Liz and her health going forward. Interesting to see and inspirational perhaps, but not very scientifically informative, since she's only "one rat". It seems the only chance of even a glimmer of insight would be a negative result - if (heaven forbid) she were to develop leukemia or some rare form of cancer, which upon biopsy was found to be exploiting lengthened telomeres to promote cell division. Even that would obviously not be definitive.
 
But if she goes on to live a long and healthy life we'll never know if the treatment had any effect at all, and whether or not any positive outcomes were more a result of a placebo effect than the treatments she received.
 
But that's just my perspective.
 
Sithra, earlier in this thread you went out on a limb and said:

If Parrish even remotely demonstrates that she's "slowed aging" via whatever she's done, the line for similar gene treatments will only be about -- oh -- a billion miles long in spite of what the establishment cautions... 

 

Would you consider this demonstration of "slowed aging", or even "reversed aging" as she appears to be claiming? If so, do you still predict a billion mile long line, and will you be in it? If not, what do you think she could conceiveably do instead to demonstrate she's "slowed aging"?
 
--Dean

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Slowed aging? Not sure, Dean, I guess it's too early to tell? Stay tuned! It's fun and exciting to see cool people do cool things with their lives for the potential benefit of others, though, and I'm crossing my fingers for her. Hope those telomeres know when to stop!

 

Her telomeres got longer (if pre and post tests were accurate, anyway) but of course we guess that aging is a systemic, whole-body series of crazy events, the body works itself to death, or is preprogrammed to wear out, either way, we get old, and lengthening telomeres may be great for stalling the process, or maybe not. We don't know, do we, and we won't ever know until someone stands up to the bully.

 

Hell yes I'd get in line to do this to myself! We need more willing human participants -- enough with the mice and rat studies -- and maybe the line of a billion people is hyperbole but let's just say there is no shortage of diseased aging people desperate for cures not now met by the medical establishment. Like her and her attempts or not, she's certainly opened a new window and let in some fresh air, eh?

 

Go Liz!

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MR has posted before about telomere length as a "marker of aging."

I don't have any reason to think this is anything other than a publicity stunt; for all we know, these gene therapies are less real than Theranos' "nanotainers."

 

 

 

In September 2015, then 44 year-old CEO of BioViva USA Inc. Elizabeth Parrish received two of her own company’s experimental gene therapies: one to protect against loss of muscle mass with age, another to battle stem cell depletion responsible for diverse age-related diseases and infirmities.

 

Are there any details on what these therapies entail?

"Unfolding Liz Parrish" is a very appropriate title for this thread. Perhaps premature, but her work could amount to a distraction that only harms the burgeoning field. I hope I'm wrong.

Edited by Taurus Londono

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Taurus,

 

Nice to hear from you! I'll post shortly in response to your thoughtful "Unity Consciousness" posts.

 

But first, regarding Liz Parrish:

 

Are there any details on what these therapies entail?

 

There is a reasonably detailed article posted earlier in this thread by Al Pater, and a Reddit Ask Me Anything session with Liz containing more details. Quoting from Al's article:

 

Parrish says she had received two forms of gene therapy produced under contract with a commercial laboratory, which she did not identify, outside the United States. In one treatment, she says, she received injections into her muscles containing the gene follistatin, which in animal experiments is shown to increase muscle mass by blocking myostatin, itself an inhibitor of muscle growth. She says she also received an intravenous dose of viruses containing genetic material to produce telomerase, a protein that extends telomeres, 

 

Here is how Reason over at Fight Aging! characterizes Parrish's self-experimentation:

 

BioViva has demonstrated prototype follistatin and telomerase gene therapies in the first human volunteer. If successful, and with a enough uptake in cells, the former should provide increased muscle mass and thus compensate partially for the sarcopenia that accompanies aging, while the latter may globally increase stem cell activity, offsetting to some limited degree the decline that occurs with age. To my eyes follistatin and similar myostatin gene therapies are about as low risk as any genetic edit can be before it has been used by thousands of people. Myostatin blockers of various sorts have been trialed in humans with positive results, and scores of animal studies for follistatin and myostatin gene therapies have taken place since the turn of the century. There are natural human and animal myostatin loss of function mutants to study as well, and most seem to do pretty well with their extra muscle tissue. Telomerase gene therapy on the other hand strikes me as being more risky. It clearly extends life and improves health in mice, but mice have very different telomere and telomerase dynamics when compared to humans. There is the strong possibility that telomerase therapies will boost cancer incidence in humans, even though they don't do that in mice. At some point it has to be tried based on the intriguing animal study results, but I wouldn't want to be first in line.

 

Parrish says that tests show her leukocyte telomeres were extended by about 9% (6.71 → 7.33 kb). Whether genetics manipulations of telomerase will turn out to be a win for health & longevity remains to be seen. But for anyone who doesn't have the hundreds of thousands of dollars it likely cost Bioviva for the treatment, and who may not want to travel to a secret clinic in South America to get the procedure done, Dr. Greger has a good video (embedded below) about how you can lengthen your leukocyte telomerase by more than Liz reports simply by practicing a good (plant-based) diet and exercise. I've included his references below the video.

 

--Dean

 

 

------------

 

References from Dr. Greger video:

 

D H Ryan, M A Espeland, G D Foster, S M Haffner, V S Hubbard, K C Johnson, S E Kahn, W C Knowler, S Z Yanovski; Look AHEAD Research Group. 2003. Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes): design and methods for a clinical trial of weight loss for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. Control Clin Trials. Oct;24(5):610-28.

K Steczkiewicz, M T Zimmermann, M Kurcinski, B A Lewis, D Dobbs, A Kloczkowski, R L Jernigan, A Kolinski, K Ginalski. 2011. Human telomerase model shows the role of the TEN domain in advancing the double helix for the next polymerization step. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Jun 7;108(23):9443-8.

D Ornish, J Lin, J Daubenmier, G Weidner, E Epel, C Kemp, M J M Magbanua, R Marlin, L Yglecias, P R Carroll, E H Blackburn. Increased telomerase activity and comprehensive lifestyle changes: a pilot study. Lancet Oncol. 2008 Nov;9(11):1048-57.

E Skordalakes. Telomerase and the benefits of healthy living. Lancet Oncol. 2008 Nov;9(11):1023-4.

E S Epel, E H Blackburn, J Lin, F S Dhabhar, N E Adler, J D Morrow, R M Cawthon. Accelerated telomere shortening in response to life stress. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Dec 7;101(49):17312-5.

E H Blackburn, E S Epel. Telomeres and adversity: Too toxic to ignore. Nature. 2012 Oct 11;490(7419):169-71.

A K Damjanovic, Y Yang, R Glaser, J K Kiecolt-Glaser, H Nguyen, B Laskowski, Y Zou, D Q Beversdorf, N Weng. Accelerated telomere erosion is associated with declining immune function of caregivers of alzheimer’s disease patients. J Immunol. 2007 Sep 15;179(6):4249-54.

K Ahola, I Siren, M Kivimaki, S Ripatti, A Aromaa, J Lonnqvist, I Hovatta. Work-Related Exhaustion and Telomere Length: A populated-based study. PLoS One. 2012;7(7):e40186.

I Shalev, T E Moffitt, K Sugden, B Williams, R M Houts, A Danese, J Mill, L Arsenaeult, A Caspi. Exposure to violence during childhood is associated with telomere erosion from 5-10 years of age: a longitudinal study. Mol Psychiatry. 2013 May;18(5):576-81.

T L Jacobs, E S Epel, J Lin, E H lackburn, O M Wolkowitz, D A Bridwell, A P Zanesco, S R Aichele, B K Sahdra, K A Maclean, B G King, P R Shaver, E L Rosenberg, E Ferrer, B A Wallace, C D Saron. Intensive meditation training, immune cell telomerase activity, and psychological mediators. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2011 Jun;36(5):664-81.

E A Hoge, M M Chen, E Orr, C A Metcalf, L E Fischer, M H Pollack, I DeVivo, N M Simon. Loving-Kindness meditation practice associated with longer telomeres in women. Brain Behav Immun. 2013 Aug;32:159-63.

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I have to ask.. why did she choose telomeres? Because of ease of measurement? Lengthening telomeres isn't going to do anything for misfolded/aggregated proteins..

 

Why not do something like combined quercetin + dasatinib? Or combined rapamycin + lithium + trametinib? (and then get blood test results measured by something like Arivale or Metabolon?)

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Why not do something like combined quercetin + dasatinib? Or combined rapamycin + lithium + trametinib? (and then get blood test results measured by something like Arivale or Metabolon?)

Actually that sounds like a quality self-trial for you, InquilineKea. Why not try a public D/Q experiment (and then get blood test results measured by something like Arivale or Metabolon) and report your stats right here!

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