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On 2/27/2021 at 8:36 AM, tea said:

Is anyone able to access this newly published article?: Effects of bag-in-box packaging on long-term shelf life of extra virgin olive oil

I tried the usual sci-hub route, but for some reason I have no luck accessing the full text.  Curiously, all of the olive oils they tested showed very little drop in total phenolic content after as long as 24 months storage.

I've bought the recent Oilalà Coratina bag-in-box packages, they are excellent in preserving the taste and smell. Having a stab at the article

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From the researchgate link, figures can be expanded, The following graph is pretty eloquent and absolutely beyond expectations. It doesn't say the environment temperature, but EVOSS in BB  exhibited a small loss of total phenols, remaining practically unaried after 12 months. But also tin cans did not cause significant loss of total phenols after 12 months, whereas after 24 months the loss in tin cans is significant, remaining smallish in BB packages.

I'm curious to know about storage temperature and other details. This research would suggest that time elapsed after production is not a governing factor, especially in BB packages, where oxidation is kept in check. 

 

image.png.98ea6a543ffc513167ad2cb1fccc7536.png

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Conversely, the effect of oxidation is very evident in tin cans, we see a totally different behaviour in BB. From the preceding graph, oxidation doesn't seem to affect total phenol contents, whereas may affect oleacin and olecanthal and probably some molecules related to taste and smell.

 

image.png.b51900cd2fa49c851c81d3381ee819a3.png

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I just sent a message to the authors to see if they are willing to provide a copy of the full article.

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2 hours ago, mccoy said:

The following graph is pretty eloquent and absolutely beyond expectations.

Yeah, I was surprised too, when I saw it, although years ago I had seen research that boxed wine keeps a lot better than bottled wine. Of course, it never caught the public's fancy, because let's face it, it's a lot less impressive to squeeze a glass of wine out of a silver bag, than to uncork and pour from a bottle. I guess for the same reason screw-tops never caught, even though they are so much better than cork.

Amazon sells a few bagged olive oils, like this one.

I wonder if the bags are recyclable?

Edited by Ron Put

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Dr. Gregor mentioned a new site True Health Initiative

In one of the articles there,  How Much Fat Should We Have in Our Diet?  the author states

My own lab has a paper in press showing acute improvement in endothelial function with genuine EVOO, and acute impairment with bargain-brand olive oil.

So the difference between high and low quality olive oil is not magnitude, but direction.

 

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37 minutes ago, Saul said:

Depends how much you trust Greger's "papers".  Dean does.

  --  Saul

To be clear, Greger isn't recommending olive oil in his latest video. He's pointing to a website run by other nutritionists who suggest that a diet of mostly whole plants is healthiest. One of those nutritionists seems to be suggesting based on his own laboratory research that genuine EVOO is good for arterial health, as Corybroo points out.

Regarding trusting Dr. Greger, I actually read the papers he points to make up my own mind. Sometimes he's on point, but sometimes he exaggerates the evidence, as I said here:

On 11/2/2015 at 1:59 PM, Dean Pomerleau said:

Dr. Greger does sometimes contorts the evidence to fit his strong bias in favor of a plant-based diet,

Here is an example of Dr. Greger's tendency to exaggerate:

Saul, I know from past experience that it is too much to ask that you actually read the information linked in a post before you comment on it, but if you had, you'd see that the author of the How Much Fat Should We Have in Our Diet? article that corybroo pointed to is really quite balanced and evidence-based. He basically says we don't know if a higher-fat plant-heavy diet with good quality EVOO is better, worse or the same as a low-fat, mostly plant diet. Here is his conclusion:

In the meantime, here’s what we do know: Whole-food, plant-predominant diets represent the theme of healthful eating. We know that whole-food, plant-exclusive diets are one of the variants on that theme that may or may not be better for human health than other entrants, but certainly are advantageous to our fellow-creatures, and the natural world at large. Parsing beyond that point [i.e. whether EVOO is good, bad or indifferent - DP] mostly leaves data behind.

--Dean

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