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Just today I was discussing with a friend the pros and cons of eggs and fish. They both appear to exhibit some alleged benefits with inherent potential problems .

One drawback of farmed eggs is the unnatural biochemistry derived by unknown compounds in industrial chickenfeed. Conversely, eggs from free ranging hens have pretty good biochemistry but biologic hazard is potentially high, since we do not now the germ strains which develop into the coop and the chicken itself, contaminating the egg and most probably its content after breaking the shell. Perfect cooking would be required and  disinfection of hands. I'm aware our immune system is in charge and is boosted by cold expposure, the biohazard remains though.

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Totally different perspective on choline (Peter Attia podcast, guest Chris Masterjohn):

https://peterattiamd.com/chrismasterjohn/

I must say, I found it pretty persuasive, or at least it showed that the choline story is far, FAR more complex than what we supposed just a couple of years ago - there's choline and then there's choline. The more you learn, the more you appreciate that you can't just run off with far going conclusions without seeing the larger context. 

Yet again, biology is far more complex than we give it credit for and humility is called for - we're often far too confident of our conclusions... the cure to that is more knowledge.

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Just yesterday I listened to that podcast. Interesting point is that if we take TMG and creatine supplements we may lower the need for choline if I understood well. The role of homocysteine and the reasons of potentially high values of it is very well explained as well.

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