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Health Wellness Good diets

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#1 AlPater

AlPater
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  • Website URL:https://www.crsociety.org/index.php?app=core&module=global&section=register

Posted 12 August 2016 - 08:33 PM

Below paper citations and full text links or availability include a short excerpt or my synopsis in square brackets.

 

 

The email list system is broken.  Posts cannot be searched.  Many of the posts do not make it to the messages I receive individually and via the daily mailings.  Therefore, I am sending this message, comprised of citations papers that seem to be appropriate to the room of the Forum.  I will try to also provide full-text links and a very brief excerpt or within brackets my synopsis of the paper.  I apologize for the fact some papers discuss results of studies on the overweight or obese, but feel that some benefits seen in such subjects bears on a continuum of benefits accrued by CR and provide incentive to folks who are overweight or obese.  Below are today's papers..

The Lancet Volume 388, Issue 10045, 13–19 August 2016, Pages 640–642
Comment
Air pollution and heart disease
Bert Brunekreef, Barbara Hoffmann
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)30375-0
http://www.sciencedi...140673616303750


Joel D Kaufman, Sara D Adar, R Graham Barr, Matthew Budoff, Gregory L Burke, Cynthia L Curl, Martha L Daviglus, Ana V Diez Roux, Amanda J Gassett, David R Jacobs Jr, Richard Kronmal, Timothy V Larson, Ana Navas-Acien, Casey Olives, Paul D Sampson, Lianne Sheppard, David S Siscovick, James H Stein, Adam A Szpiro, Karol E Watson
Association between air pollution and coronary artery calcification within six metropolitan areas in the USA (the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution): a longitudinal cohort study
The Lancet, Volume 388, Issue 10045, 13–19 August 2016, Pages 696-704
http://sci-hub.cc/10...6736(16)00378-0

Summary

Background

Long-term exposure to fine particulate matter less than 2·5 μm in diameter (PM2·5) and traffic-related air pollutant concentrations are associated with cardiovascular risk. The disease process underlying these associations remains uncertain. We aim to assess association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and progression of coronary artery calcium and common carotid artery intima-media thickness.

Methods

In this prospective 10-year cohort study, we repeatedly measured coronary artery calcium by CT in 6795 participants aged 45–84 years enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air) in six metropolitan areas in the USA. Repeated scans were done for nearly all participants between 2002 and 2005, for a subset of participants between 2005 and 2007, and for half of all participants between 2010 and 2012. Common carotid artery intima-media thickness was measured by ultrasound in all participants at baseline and in 2010–12 for 3459 participants. Residence-specific spatio-temporal pollution concentration models, incorporating community-specific measurements, agency monitoring data, and geographical predictors, estimated concentrations of PM2·5 and nitrogen oxides (NOX) between 1999 and 2012. The primary aim was to examine the association between both progression of coronary artery calcium and mean carotid artery intima-media thickness and long-term exposure to ambient air pollutant concentrations (PM2·5, NOX, and black carbon) between examinations and within the six metropolitan areas, adjusting for baseline age, sex, ethnicity, socioeconomic characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, site, and CT scanner technology.

Findings

In this population, coronary calcium increased on average by 24 Agatston units per year (SD 58), and intima-media thickness by 12 μm per year (10), before adjusting for risk factors or air pollutant exposures. Participant-specific pollutant concentrations averaged over the years 2000–10 ranged from 9·2–22·6 μg PM2·5/m3 and 7·2–139·2 parts per billion (ppb) NOX. For each 5 μg PM2·5/m3 increase, coronary calcium progressed by 4·1 Agatston units per year (95% CI 1·4–6·8) and for each 40 ppb NOX coronary calcium progressed by 4·8 Agatston units per year (0·9–8·7). Pollutant exposures were not associated with intima-media thickness change. The estimate for the effect of a 5 μg/m3 higher long-term exposure to PM2·5 in intima-media thickness was −0·9 μm per year (95% CI −3·0 to 1·3). For 40 ppb higher NOX, the estimate was 0·2 μm per year (−1·9 to 2·4).

Interpretation

Increased concentrations of PM2·5 and traffic-related air pollution within metropolitan areas, in ranges commonly encountered worldwide, are associated with progression in coronary calcification, consistent with acceleration of atherosclerosis. This study supports the case for global efforts of pollution reduction in prevention of cardiovascular diseases.


Graham A Colditz, Karen M Emmons
The role of universal health coverage in reducing cancer deaths and disparities
The Lancet, Volume 388, Issue 10045, 13–19 August 2016, Pages 638-640
http://sci-hub.cc/10...6736(16)30376-2
KME is employed by Kaiser Permanente, a US managed care consortium.


Mahiben Maruthappu, Johnathan Watkins, Aisyah Mohd Noor, Callum Williams, Raghib Ali, Richard Sullivan, Thomas Zeltner, Rifat Atun
Economic downturns, universal health coverage, and cancer mortality in high-income and middle-income countries, 1990–2010: a longitudinal analysis
The Lancet, Volume 388, Issue 10045, 13–19 August 2016, Pages 684-695
http://sci-hub.cc/10...6736(16)00577-8

Summary
Background

The global economic crisis has been associated with increased unemployment and reduced public-sector expenditure on health care (PEH). We estimated the effects of changes in unemployment and PEH on cancer mortality, and identified how universal health coverage (UHC) affected these relationships.
Methods

For this longitudinal analysis, we obtained data from the World Bank and WHO (1990–2010). We aggregated mortality data for breast cancer in women, prostate cancer in men, and colorectal cancers in men and women, which are associated with survival rates that exceed 50%, into a treatable cancer class. We likewise aggregated data for lung and pancreatic cancers, which have 5 year survival rates of less than 10%, into an untreatable cancer class. We used multivariable regression analysis, controlling for country-specific demographics and infrastructure, with time-lag analyses and robustness checks to investigate the relationship between unemployment, PEH, and cancer mortality, with and without UHC. We used trend analysis to project mortality rates, on the basis of trends before the sharp unemployment rise that occurred in many countries from 2008 to 2010, and compared them with observed rates.
Results

Data were available for 75 countries, representing 2·106 billion people, for the unemployment analysis and for 79 countries, representing 2·156 billion people, for the PEH analysis. Unemployment rises were significantly associated with an increase in all-cancer mortality and all specific cancers except lung cancer in women. By contrast, untreatable cancer mortality was not significantly linked with changes in unemployment. Lag analyses showed significant associations remained 5 years after unemployment increases for the treatable cancer class. Rerunning analyses, while accounting for UHC status, removed the significant associations. All-cancer, treatable cancer, and specific cancer mortalities significantly decreased as PEH increased. Time-series analysis provided an estimate of more than 40 000 excess deaths due to a subset of treatable cancers from 2008 to 2010, on the basis of 2000–07 trends. Most of these deaths were in non-UHC countries.
Interpretation

Unemployment increases are associated with rises in cancer mortality; UHC seems to protect against this effect. PEH increases are associated with reduced cancer mortality. Access to health care could underlie these associations. We estimate that the 2008–10 economic crisis was associated with about 260 000 excess cancer-related deaths in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development alone.


[OP.2A.09] SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE VARIATION DURING 6 YEARS AND MORTALITY: THE AGE AMPLIFIES THE IMPACT OF A SPONTANEOUS INCREASE OR REDUCTION OF PRESSURE AMONG HYPERTENSIVE: IPC COHORT.
Thomas-Jean F, Pannier B, Hanon O, Czernichow S, Lemogne C, Simon T, Simon J, Danchin N.
J Hypertens. 2016 Sep;34 Suppl 2:e18. doi: 10.1097/01.hjh.0000491374.01833.d7.
PMID: 27508617
[The abstract is pdf-availed.]
Among normotensives, increase SBP has a deleterious effect only among subjects before 55 years old


[OP.LB.02.09] WHAT ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME GENOTYPE AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE HAVE IN COMMON IN PORTUGUESE CENTENARIANS?
Pereira Da Silva A, Ramos Marques N, Matos A, Gil A, Gorjão Clara J, Bicho M.
J Hypertens. 2016 Sep;34 Suppl 2:e80-1. doi: 10.1097/01.hjh.0000491545.64127.b0.
PMID: 27508809
[The abstract is pdf-availed.]
[Not a prospective study but they compared centenarians with those unlikely to get that old and found that it was but was not only genes that seem to get them there -- hypertension is a risk for the oldest old too.]


Association between body mass index and mortality in a prospective cohort of Chinese adults.
Sun H, Ren X, Chen Z, Li C, Chen S, Wu S, Chen Y, Yang X.
Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Aug;95(32):e4327.
PMID: 27512844
http://journals.lww....rtality.10.aspx
lowest risk of all-cause mortality was seen among persons with a BMI of 24 to 28 kg/m in male ... in female, a high BMI was associated with increased mortality, and a BMI of <18.5 kg/m was associated with the lowest risk.


Personalized risk prediction for type 2 diabetes: the potential of genetic risk scores.
Läll K, Mägi R, Morris A, Metspalu A, Fischer K.
Genet Med. 2016 Aug 11. doi: 10.1038/gim.2016.103. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID:  27513194
http://biorxiv.org/c...041731.full.pdf
genetic risk score (GRS) that has the strongest association with type 2 diabetes (T2D) ... Adding GRS to the prediction model for 5-year T2D risk resulted in continuous net reclassification improvement of 0.324 (95% CI: 0.211-0.444). In addition, a significant effect of the GRS on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality was observed.


[OP.1C.09] REPRODUCTIVE HISTORY OF WOMEN AS A DETERMINANT OF ARTERIAL STIFFNESS - THE MALMÖ DIET CANCER STUDY.
Nilsson PM, Carlqvist E, Gottsäter M.
J Hypertens. 2016 Sep;34 Suppl 2:e10. doi: 10.1097/01.hjh.0000491354.79923.fb.
PMID: 27508557
carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV) ... Reproductive Risk Index (RRI) was created to capture the combined effect of separate reproductive variables (age at menarche, parity, and age at menopause). ... Age at menarche (beta = -0.040, p < 0.05) was inversely associated with logarithmic c-f PWV ... RRI was significantly associated (beta = 0.050, p < 0.05) with non-logarithm (supposedly non-linear) c-f PWV.


Subjective mood and energy levels of healthy weight and overweight/obese healthy adults on high-and low-glycemic load experimental diets.
Breymeyer KL, Lampe JW, McGregor BA, Neuhouser ML.
Appetite. 2016 Aug 6. pii: S0195-6663(16)30322-1. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2016.08.008. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27507131
http://sci-hub.cc/10...pet.2016.08.008
In conclusion, a high-glycemic load diet was associated with higher depression symptoms, total mood disturbance, and fatigue compared to a low-glycemic load diet especially in overweight/obese, but otherwise healthy, adults.


Lifetime grain consumption and breast cancer risk.
Farvid MS, Cho E, Eliassen AH, Chen WY, Willett WC.
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2016 Aug 10. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27510186
http://sci-hub.cc/10...0549-016-3910-0
adult brown rice which was associated with lower risk of overall and premenopausal breast cancer (for each 2 servings/week: RR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.89-0.99 and RR 0.91; 95 % CI 0.85-0.99, respectively) and adult white bread intake which was associated with increased overall breast cancer risk (for each 2 servings/week: RR 1.02; 95 % CI 1.01-1.04), as well as breast cancer before and after menopause. Further, pasta intake was inversely associated with overall breast cancer risk.


Vegetarian diet reduces the risk of hypertension independent of abdominal obesity and inflammation: a prospective study.
Chuang SY, Chiu TH, Lee CY, Liu TT, Tsao CK, Hsiung CA, Chiu YF.
J Hypertens. 2016 Aug 10. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID:  27512965
[The below paper is pdf-availed.]
Taiwanese vegetarians had lower incidence of hypertension than nonvegetarians.


[OP.1B.04] ASSOCIATIONS OF 15-YEAR AVERAGE POTASSIUM INTAKE WITH LONG-TERM CARDIOVASCULAR AND RENAL OUTCOME IN THE OUTPATIENT CLINICAL SETTING.
Van Noordenne N, Olde Engberink RH, Van Den Hoek TC, Van Den Born BJ, Vogt L.
J Hypertens. 2016 Sep;34 Suppl 2:e6. doi: 10.1097/01.hjh.0000491339.74085.91.
PMID: 27508744
[The abstract is pdf-availed.]
high potassium intake is associated with renoprotection ... not ... CV disease and mortality.

xx

Blood pressure variability and cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis.
Stevens SL, Wood S, Koshiaris C, Law K, Glasziou P, Stevens RJ, McManus RJ.
BMJ. 2016 Aug 9;354:i4098. doi: 10.1136/bmj.i4098.
PMID: 27511067
http://www.bmj.com/c...t/354/bmj.i4098
http://www.bmj.com/c....i4098.full.pdf
Increased long term variability in systolic blood pressure was associated with risk of all cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 1.22), cardiovascular disease mortality (1.18, 1.09 to 1.28), cardiovascular disease events (1.18, 1.07 to 1.30), coronary heart disease (1.10, 1.04 to 1.16), and stroke (1.15, 1.04 to 1.27). Increased mid-term and short term variability in daytime systolic blood pressure were also associated with all cause mortality (1.15, 1.06 to 1.26 and 1.10, 1.04 to 1.16, respectively).


Effects of the Mediterranean Diet on Cardiovascular Outcomes-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.
Liyanage T, Ninomiya T, Wang A, Neal B, Jun M, Wong MG, Jardine M, Hillis GS, Perkovic V.
PLoS One. 2016 Aug 10;11(8):e0159252. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0159252. eCollection 2016.
PMID: 27509006
Free Article
http://journals.plos...al.pone.0159252
http://journals.plos...one.0159252.PDF
evidence is limited and highly variable. Results must be interpreted with caution.


https://www.crsociet...en +consumption


Circadian Characteristics of Older Adults and Aerobic Capacity.
Dupont Rocher S, Bessot N, Sesboüé B, Bulla J, Davenne D.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Jun;71(6):817-22. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv195. Epub 2015 Nov 23.
PMID: 26602866
http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv195

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Alteration of circadian rhythmicity with aging might depend on physical aerobic capacity.

METHODS:

Three groups of participants were established based on their peak oxygen consumption (Group 1 < 20mL/min/kg; Group 2 > 20mL/min/kg and <30mL/min/kg; Group 3 > 30mL/min/kg). Each participant had an individual evaluation of their circadian rhythmicity characteristics through two well-known circadian rhythms: core temperature and rest/activity cycles. Nocturnal sleep was also recorded using actimetry and diurnal vigilance tested in a car driving simulator.

RESULTS:

The amplitude of the oral temperature fluctuations for Group 1 is significantly lower (p < .05) than that of Group 3. Group 2 (p < .01) and Group 3 (p < .05) were significantly more active during the day than Group 1. The index of inactivity during the night for Groups 2 (p < .05) and 3 (p < .01) was higher than Group 1. Results of the car driving simulation showed that for Group 1, the number of lane crossings was significantly higher than Groups 2 (p < .01) and 3 (p < .01). In addition, diurnal vigilance was lower in Group 1.

CONCLUSIONS:

The biological clock seems to be enhanced in older participants with a higher level of physical capacity.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; Physical activity; Physical performance



#2 AlPater

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 05:44 PM

Below paper citations and full text links or availability include a short excerpt or my synopsis in square brackets.

 

 

Elucidating the Association Between Depressive Symptoms, Coronary Heart Disease, and Stroke in Black and White Adults: The REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

Nathalie Moise, Yulia Khodneva, Joshua Richman, Daichi Shimbo, Ian Kronish, and Monika M. Safford

Am Heart Assoc. 2016;5:e003767. Originally published August 12, 2016. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.116.003767

http://jaha.ahajourn.../8/e003767.full

http://jaha.ahajourn...7.full.pdf html

Time‐varying depressive symptoms were significantly associated with CVD death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.30, 95% CI 1.04–1.63), with a trend toward significance for fatal and nonfatal stroke (adjusted hazard ratio 1.26, 95% CI 0.99–1.60) but not fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (adjusted hazard ratio 1.11, 95% CI 0.89–1.38).

 

Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Related to Disability Among Older Adults.

Doi T, Shimada H, Makizako H, Tsutsumimoto K, Hotta R, Nakakubo S, Suzuki T.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Jun;71(6):797-802. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv167. Epub 2015 Sep 30.

PMID: 26424830

http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv167

lower quartile in IGF-1 related to disability compared with the highest quartile (Q4), even when adjusting for covariates including gait speed and Mini Mental State Examination score (Q1: hazard ratio = 1.72, 95% confidence intervals: 1.06-2.81; Q2: hazard ratio = 1.64, 95% confidence intervals: 0.99-2.71; Q3: hazard ratio=1.31, 95% confidence intervals: 0.76-2.25). In the analysis, stratified by sex, there was also significant relationship between IGF-1 and disability among women, but not men.

 

[DP Note: In the above, the last sentence refers to the fact that after a large set of statistical corrections for things like age, BMI, existing diseases, exercise, being in the lowest quintile of IGF-1 was predictive of disability in women, but not men, where the HR was 1.29 (CI 0.60–2.75). In fact, for men, being in the third quartile (relative to the highest, 4th quartile), was worse than being in the lowest (HR 1.47 (0.69–3.15)), but all the men's data massively spanned the HR = 1.0 mark, meaning it's pretty meaningless]

 

Effects of Mobility and Cognition on Risk of Mortality in Women in Late Life: A Prospective Study.

Ensrud KE, Lui LY, Paudel ML, Schousboe JT, Kats AM, Cauley JA, McCulloch CE, Yaffe K, Cawthon PM, Hillier TA, Taylor BC; Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF).

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Jun;71(6):759-65. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv220. Epub 2015 Dec 28.

PMID: 26714566

http://biomedgeronto...t/71/6/759.long

http://biomedgeronto...9.full.pdf html

Compared to women with good mobility, mortality risks were increased among women with intermediate mobility (hazard ratio (HR) 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.57) and those with poor mobility     (HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.24-2.16) after consideration of cognition and other mortality risk factors. Similarly, mortality risks were higher among women with mild cognitive impairment (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.21-1.76) and those with dementia (HR 1.88, 95% CI 1.54-2.31) compared to women with normal cognition

 

Coherent and Contradictory Facts, Feats and Fictions Associated with Metal Accumulation in Parkinson's Disease: Epicenter or Outcome, Yet a Demigod Question.

Rasheed MS, Tripathi S, Mishra S, Singh MP.

Mol Neurobiol. 2016 Aug 1. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID: 27480264

http://sci-hub.cc/10...2035-016-0016-y

[I found it difficult to be that whether “metal accumulation is an epicenter or an outcome” remains unanswered, according to the authors.]


Edited by Dean Pomerleau, 16 August 2016 - 02:55 PM.
Clarified IGF-1 & Disability Study


#3 AlPater

AlPater
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Posted 14 August 2016 - 08:38 PM

Responses of Dendritic Cells to TLR-4 Stimulation Are Maintained in the Elderly and Resist the Effects of CMV Infection Seen in the Young.

Janssen N, Derhovanessian E, Demuth I, Arnaout F, Steinhagen-Thiessen E, Pawelec G.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Sep;71(9):1117-23. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv119. Epub 2015 Nov 27.

PMID: 26615178

free

http://biomedgeronto.../71/9/1117.long

http://biomedgeronto...7.full.pdf html

Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) … myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) … we investigated … response to [lipopolysaccharide] in 39 younger (23-34 years) and 61 older (62-77 years) … Cytomegalovirus (CMV)… was strongly stimulated in circulating mDCs from the elderly. However, mDCs of more than half of the young donors failed to respond in the same way. This was related to their already highly activated ex vivo state, predominantly observed in CMV-seropositive young donors and associated with lower CMV-specific IgG titres.

 

Life Expectancy With and Without Pain in the U.S. Elderly Population.

Zimmer Z, Rubin S.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Sep;71(9):1171-6. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glw028. Epub 2016 Mar 17.

PMID: 26988661

Free

http://biomedgeronto.../71/9/1171.long

http://biomedgeronto...1.full.pdf html

Females have higher life expectancy than males but similar expectations of pain-free life. … 85-year-old female pain-free at baseline expects 7.04 more years, 5.28 being pain-free. An 85-year-old female with severe pain at baseline expects 6.42 years with only 2.66 pain-free. Percent of life with pain decreases by age for those pain-free at baseline and increases for those with pain at baseline.

 

A Prospective Study of Back Pain and Risk of Falls Among Older Community-dwelling Women.

Marshall LM, Litwack-Harrison S, Cawthon PM, Kado DM, Deyo RA, Makris UE, Carlson HL, Nevitt MC; Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) Research Group.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Sep;71(9):1177-83. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv225. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

PMID:  26757988

http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv225

[It was fairly convincing but I thought covariates worth considering were BMI and taking meds such as opiods and sleeping pills.]

Most (61%) women reported any back pain. … recurrent falls (multivariable RR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.3, 1.8). … 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1, 1.8) for mild back pain to 1.8 (95% CI: 1.4, 2.3) for activity-limiting back pain. RRs of any fall were also significantly increased albeit smaller than those for recurrent falls.

 

Bioavailable Testosterone Linearly Declines Over A Wide Age Spectrum in Men and Women From The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

Fabbri E, An Y, Gonzalez-Freire M, Zoli M, Maggio M, Studenski SA, Egan JM, Chia CW, Ferrucci L.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Sep;71(9):1202-9. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glw021. Epub 2016 Feb 27.

PMID: 26921861

http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glw021

measured bioavailable testosterone (mBT) … calculated bioavailable testosterone (cBT) … is a much stronger correlate of chronological age than cBT.

 

Glucose Levels and Risk of Frailty.

Zaslavsky O, Walker RL, Crane PK, Gray SL, Larson EB.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Sep;71(9):1223-9. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glw024. Epub 2016 Mar 1.

PMID: 26933160

http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glw024

[Both fasting or random glucose or HbA1c levels in non-diabetics were associated with continuous increased frailty over the years.]



#4 AlPater

AlPater
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Posted 17 August 2016 - 03:14 PM

The effects of almond consumption on fasting blood lipid levels: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
Kathy Musa-Veloso, Lina Paulionis, Theresa Poon, Han Youl Lee
Journal of Nutritional Science , Volume 5 , 2016, e34
doi: 10.1017/jns.2016.19 (About doi) Published Online on 16th August 2016
http://journals.camb...048679016000197
http://journals.camb...5fb4dfe7e2a40f0
TC, LDL-C and TAG were significantly reduced by −0·153 mmol/l (P < 0·001), −0·124 mmol/l (P = 0·001) and −0·067 mmol/l (P = 0·042), respectively, and that HDL-C was not affected (−0·017 mmol/l; P = 0·207). … consumption of nuts reduces the risk of heart disease.

 
Breakfast Macronutrient Composition Influences Thermic Effect of Feeding and Fat Oxidation in Young Women Who Habitually Skip Breakfast.
Neumann BL, Dunn A, Johnson D, Adams JD, Baum JI.
Nutrients. 2016 Aug 10;8(8). pii: E490.
PMID: 27517958
http://www.mdpi.com/...643/8/8/490/htm
[The high carbohydrate breakfast had a much higher percent sugars and half as much fiber.]
Consumption of PRO breakfast for 8 days increased TEF compared to CHO and [skipping breakfast]

 

DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) Diet and Risk of Subsequent Kidney Disease.
Rebholz CM, Crews DC, Grams ME, Steffen LM, Levey AS, Miller ER 3rd, Appel LJ, Coresh J.
Am J Kidney Dis. 2016 Aug 1. pii: S0272-6386(16)30257-8. doi: 10.1053/j.ajkd.2016.05.019. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27519166
http://sci-hub.cc/10...jkd.2016.05.019
[I find the results somewhat confusing.  Why was blood pressure adjusted for in Model 3 while not adjusting for things like protein and lipids?]
DASH diet score in the lowest tertile were 16% more likely to develop kidney disease than those with the highest score tertile … high red and processed meat intake was adversely associated with kidney disease and high nuts, legumes, and low-fat dairy products intake was associated with reduced risk

 

Association between maternal nutritional status in pregnancy and offspring cognitive function during childhood and adolescence; a systematic review.
Veena SR, Gale CR, Krishnaveni GV, Kehoe SH, Srinivasan K, Fall CH.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2016 Aug 12;16(1):220.
PMID: 27520466
http://bmcpregnancyc...2884-016-1011-z
http://download.spri...e1fb1cd983be64b
There was consistent evidence linking maternal obesity with lower cognitive function in children

Association between a dietary carbohydrate index and cardiovascular disease in the SUN (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra) Project.
Zazpe I, Santiago S, Gea A, Ruiz-Canela M, Carlos S, Bes-Rastrollo M, Martínez-González MA.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Jul 12. pii: S0939-4753(16)30109-0. doi: 10.1016/j.numecd.2016.07.002. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27524801
http://linkinghub.el...939475316301090
[Figure 1B seemed to say substituting sugars for fiber was not a risk.  Glycemic index, liquid carbohydrates and fiber seemed not to be significant factors.]

https://www.scienced...60815064759.htm
Effects of the Dietary Approaches To Stop Hypertension (DASH) Diet and Sodium Intake on Serum Uric Acid.
Juraschek SP, Gelber AC, Choi HK, Appel LJ, Miller ER 3rd.
Arthritis Rheumatol. 2016 Aug 14. doi: 10.1002/art.39813. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27523583
http://sci-hub.cc/10.1002/art.39813
The DASH diet reduced SUA by -0.35 mg/dL (95%CI: -0.65,-0.05; P=0.02) with a higher effect (-1.3 mg/dL; 95% CI -2.50, -0.08) among participants (N=8) with a baseline SUA ≥7 mg/dL. Increasing sodium intake from the low level, decreased SUA by -0.3 mg/dL (95%CI: -0.5,-0.2; P<0.001) during the medium sodium level and by -0.4 mg/dL (95%CI: -0.6,-0.3; P<0.001) during the high sodium level.

Folic Acid Supplementation and the Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases: A MetaAnalysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
Yanping Li, Tianyi Huang, Yan Zheng, Tauland Muka, Jenna Troup, and Frank B. Hu
J Am Heart Assoc. 2016;5:e003768. Originally published August 15, 2016.
doi: 10.1161/JAHA.116.003768
http://jaha.ahajourn.../8/e003768.full
http://jaha.ahajourn...8.full.pdf html

risks of folic acid supplementation compared with controls were 0.90 (95% CI 0.84–0.96; P=0.002) for stroke, 1.04 (95% CI 0.99–1.09; P=0.16) for coronary heart disease, and 0.96 (95% CI 0.92–0.99; P=0.02) for overall CVD. The intervention effects for both stroke and combined CVD were more pronounced among participants with lower plasma folate levels at baseline (both P<0.02 for interaction). In stratified analyses, a greater beneficial effect for overall CVD was seen in trials among participants without preexisting CVD (P=0.006 for interaction) or in trials with larger reduction in homocysteine levels (P=0.009 for interaction).
This research is partly supported by Metagenics
Dr Hu has received research support from Metagenics and
served as a consultant for Metagenics.

General Anesthetics and Neurotoxicity: How Much Do We Know?
Jevtovic-Todorovic V.
Anesthesiol Clin. 2016 Sep;34(3):439-51. doi: 10.1016/j.anclin.2016.04.001. Review.
PMID: 27521190
http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2784653/
[The paper suggest seemingly that general anesthesia is a risk only for the very young.]
Unlike the findings in children whereby some correlation between an early exposure to general anesthesia and
lasting neurocognitive impairments have been suggested, clinical studies of postop-
erative cognitive decline (POCD) in elderly human population have been less conclu-
sive. ...  hallmark lesions of Alzheimer disease, excessive plaque
formation and tauopathy, have been shown to be influenced by general anesthetics,49,50

https://en.wikipedia...#Dental_disease
PMID: 24066124
https://www.ncbi.nlm...one.0074234.pdf
      Coenzyme Q Protects Against Age-Related Alveolar Bone Loss Associated to n-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Rich-Diets by Modulating Mitochondrial Mechanisms.
Varela-Lopez A, Bullon P, Battino M, Ramirez-Tortosa M, Ochoa JJ, Cordero MD, Ramirez-Tortosa CL, Rubini C, Zizzi A, Quiles JL.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 May;71(5):593-600. Epub 2015 Jul 28.
PMID: 26219851
coenzyme Q10 could counteract the negative effects of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid on alveolar bone loss (a major feature of periodontitis) associated to age.

Association Rules Analysis of Comorbidity and Multimorbidity: The Concord Health and Aging in Men Project.
Held FP, Blyth F, Gnjidic D, Hirani V, Naganathan V, Waite LM, Seibel MJ, Rollo J, Handelsman DJ, Cumming RG, Le Couteur DG.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 May;71(5):625-31. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv181. Epub 2015 Oct 27.
PMID: 26508296
Free Full Text (HTML)
http://biomedgeronto...t/71/5/625.long
http://biomedgeronto...5.full.pdf html
[It is a cross-sectional study but seemed to be of interest to me anyway.]
community-dwelling men aged 70 years or older … (75%) of participants had multimorbidity. Several morbidity clusters were apparent (vascular cluster, metabolic cluster, neurodegenerative cluster, mental health and other cluster, and a musculoskeletal and other cluster). ... Anxiety and heart failure had the highest comorbidity interestingness scores while obesity, hearing impairment, and arthritis had the lowest (zero) scores. ... Frailty had a very complex and rich set of frequent and interesting comorbidities, while there were no frequent and interesting sets associated with falls.

Joint Associations of Dual Sensory Impairment and No-Activity Involvement With 1-Year Mortality in Nursing Homes: Results From the SHELTER Study.
Yamada Y, Denkinger MD, Onder G, van der Roest HG, Finne-Soveri H, Bernabei R, Topinkova E.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 May;71(5):643-8. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv191. Epub 2015 Nov 18.
PMID: 26582074
http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv191
[It was interesting to me that either factor alone was more or less neutral or even not significantly inversely associated with mortality, whereas the combination was bad.]

https://en.wikipedia...lotho_(biology)says "Klotho-deficient mice show increased production of vitamin D, and altered mineral-ion homeostasis is suggested to be a cause of premature aging‑like phenotypes, because the lowering of vitamin D activity by dietary restriction reverses the premature aging‑like phenotypes and prolongs survival in these mutants."     
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/26221964: "Expression levels of putative neuroprotective factors, klotho (Kl) and transthyretin (Ttr), are also elevated by CR in adulthood"
         Plasma Klotho and Cognitive Decline in Older Adults: Findings From the InCHIANTI Study.
Shardell M, Semba RD, Rosano C, Kalyani RR, Bandinelli S, Chia CW, Ferrucci L.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 May;71(5):677-82. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv140. Epub 2015 Aug 21.
PMID: 26297657
http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv140
Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Trail-Making Tests A and B (Trails A and Trails B ... Each additional natural logarithm of klotho (pg/mL) was associated with 35% lower risk of meaningful decline in MMSE, defined as decline exceeding three points (relative risk = 0.65; 95% confidence interval 0.45, 0.95; p value = .02), and 0.75-point smaller average 3-year decline (baseline to 3-year visit) in MMSE (95% confidence interval 0.02, 1.48; p value = .04). No statistically significant associations were found between klotho and declining Trails A


Edited by AlPater, 17 August 2016 - 03:18 PM.


#5 AlPater

AlPater
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  • Website URL:https://www.crsociety.org/index.php?app=core&amp;amp;module=global&amp;amp;section=register

Posted 18 August 2016 - 07:33 PM

urinary plasminogen activator (uPA or u-PA … links … to vascular diseases and cancer.
https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Urokinase
Long-Lived αMUPA Mice Show Reduced Sexual Dimorphism in Lifespan, and in Energy and Circadian Homeostasis-Related Parameters.
Steckler R, Shabtay-Yanai A, Pinsky M, Rauch M, Tamir S, Gutman R.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Apr;71(4):451-60. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv019. Epub 2015 Apr 11.
PMID: 25863036
http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv019
Male αMUPA mice showed increased lifespan, reduced body weight and food intake, and aligned endogenous rhythm with a tau of 24.0h versus a tau <24h in WT. However, no differences were found when intake was corrected for metabolic mass in male αMUPA mice. αMUPA's sexual dimorphism was damped or lacking in all studied traits, while … αMUPA's transgene overrides sex-dependent mechanisms involved in lifespan and in energy and circadian homeostasis. … αMUPA's 24-h tau could contribute to their longevity.

Association of Physical Activity History With Physical Function and Mortality in Old Age.
Stenholm S, Koster A, Valkeinen H, Patel KV, Bandinelli S, Guralnik JM, Ferrucci L.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Apr;71(4):496-501. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv111. Epub 2015 Aug 18.
PMID: 26290538
http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv111
Physical inactivity at baseline was associated with greater decline in Short Physical Performance Battery score (mean 9-year change: -2.72, 95% CI: -3.08, -2.35 vs -0.98, 95% -1.57, -0.39) and greater rate of incident mobility disability (hazard ratio 4.66, 95% CI 1.14-19.07) and mortality (hazard ratio 2.18, 95% CI 1.01-4.70)


But if you put the task of remembering aside so that you can go about your work of being a rocket scientist, it's a very good thing — since you can now dedicate all your brain power to this complex cognitive task."
http://www.cbc.ca/ne...ogies-1.3725554
The Association Between Midlife Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms in Late Life: Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study.
Chang M, Snaedal J, Einarsson B, Bjornsson S, Saczynski JS, Aspelund T, Garcia M, Gudnason V, Harris TB, Launer LJ, Jonsson PV.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Apr;71(4):502-7. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv196. Epub 2015 Nov 2.
PMID: 26525090
http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv196
those who were active at midlife were less likely to have high level of depressive symptomatology … (odds ratio = 0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.43-0.86, p = .005).

Gout in Older Adults: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Burke BT, Köttgen A, Law A, Grams M, Baer AN, Coresh J, McAdams-DeMarco MA.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Apr;71(4):536-42. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv120. Epub 2015 Dec 28.
PMID:  26714568
http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv120
The cumulative incidence from middle age to age 65 was 8.6% in men and 2.5% in women; by age 75 the cumulative incidence was 11.8% and 5.0%. In middle age, increased adiposity, beer intake, protein intake, smoking status, hypertension, diuretic use, and kidney function (but not sex) were associated with an increased gout risk in older age. In addition, a 100 µmol/L increase in genetic urate score was associated with a 3.29-fold (95% confidence interval: 1.63-6.63) increased gout risk in older age.

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...nancy-1.3721190
Association of Acetaminophen Use During Pregnancy With Behavioral Problems in Childhood: Evidence Against Confounding.
Stergiakouli E, Thapar A, Davey Smith G.
JAMA Pediatr. 2016 Aug 15. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.1775. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27533796
prenatal acetaminophen use at 18 (n = 4415; 53%) and 32 weeks of pregnancy (n = 3381; 42%) was associated with higher odds of having conduct problems (risk ratio [RR], 1.42; 95% CI, 1.25-1.62) and hyperactivity symptoms (RR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.16-1.49), while maternal acetaminophen use at 32 weeks was also associated with higher odds of having emotional symptoms (RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.09-1.53) and total difficulties (RR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.21-1.77).

http://www.cbc.ca/ra...onger-1.3721553
Longer-Lived Parents and Cardiovascular Outcomes8-Year Follow-Up In 186,000 U.K. Biobank Participants
Janice L. Atkins, PhD; Luke C. Pilling, PhD; Alessandro Ble, MD; Ambarish Dutta, MBBS, PhD; Lorna W. Harries, PhD; Anna Murray, PhD; Carol Brayne, MD; Jean-Marie Robine, PhD; George A. Kuchel, MD; Luigi Ferrucci, MD, PhD; David Melzer, MBBCh, PhD
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2016;68(8):874-875. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2016.05.072
http://linkinghub.el...735109716335446
after adjustment for age, sex, ethnicity, education, income, smoking,
alcohol use,physical activity, and body mass index; with increasing mother’s and father’s
survival(=/>70 years), all-cause mortality declined 16% (hazard
ratio  : 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79
to 0.89) and 17% per decade (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.78
to 0.89). Combined parental longevity was inversely
associated with all-cause mortality (HR per SD increase in parents’
age at death: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.89 to
0.94) and CHD mortality (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.78 to
0.89) but less strongly with cancer mortality (HR:
0.92;95%CI:0.90to0.95).CHDmortalitydeclined
20% and 21% per decade increase with mother’s
(HR:0.80;95%CI:0.68to0.95)andfather’s(HR:
0.79;95%CI:0.63to0.98)survival =/>70 years,
respectively.
Offspring of longer-lived parents had lower inci-
dence of multiple circulatory conditions including
peripheral vascular disease (HR per SD increase in
parents’ age at death: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.76 to 0.87),
heart failure (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.81 to 0.91), stroke
(HR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.83 to 0.93), hypertension (HR:
0.88; 95% CI: 0.86 to 0.91), CHD (HR: 0.91; 95% CI:
0.88 to 0.94), anemia (HR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.86 to 0.96),
hypercholesterolemia (HR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.90 to 0.96)
and atrial fibrillation (HR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.90 to 0.97).
For cancer incidence, associations were smaller,
except for lung cancer. There were no significant associations with incident diab
etes, colorectal/breast/prostate cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease, asthma, hypothyroidism, or depression ac-
counting for multiple statistical testing (p<0.002).
These results were very similar for prevalent disease.

Estimating the Years Lived With and Without Age-Related Sensory Impairment.
Kiely KM, Mitchell P, Gopinath B, Luszcz MA, Jagger C, Anstey KJ.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 May;71(5):637-42. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv198. Epub 2015 Oct 29.
PMID: 26515257
http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv198
      men aged 65 had a total life expectancy of 19.4 years, and were estimated to live for 10.4 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.1, 11.7) with hearing impairment, 2.8 years (95% CI: 2.4, 3.2) with vision impairment, and 2.2 years (95% CI: 1.8, 2.6) with dual sensory impairment.
     Women aged 65 had a total life expectancy of 23.2 years, and were estimated to live for 12.9 years (95% CI: 11.9, 13.9) with hearing impairment, 3.9 years (95% CI: 3.4, 4.4) with vision impairment, and 3.2 years (95% CI: 2.7, 3.7) with dual sensory impairment.
 



#6 AlPater

AlPater
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  • Website URL:https://www.crsociety.org/index.php?app=core&amp;amp;module=global&amp;amp;section=register

Posted 19 August 2016 - 07:52 PM

The papers that are not free full-texts are pdf-availed.

 

 

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...study-1.3723324
https://www.projectb...php?le=1&hosp=0
Measuring Burden of Unhealthy Behaviours Using a Multivariable Predictive Approach: Life Expectancy Lost in Canada Attributable to Smoking, Alcohol, Physical Inactivity, and Diet.
Manuel DG, Perez R, Sanmartin C, Taljaard M, Hennessy D, Wilson K, Tanuseputro P, Manson H, Bennett C, Tuna M, Fisher S, Rosella LC.
PLoS Med. 2016 Aug 16;13(8):e1002082. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002082. eCollection 2016 Aug.
PMID: 27529741
[I believe that Dean has provided evidence that physical activity is the major risk for premature death.]
Smoking, by itself, was associated with 32% to 39% of the difference in life expectancy

Physical activity and survival in breast cancer.
Ammitzbøll G, Søgaard K, Karlsen RV, Tjønneland A, Johansen C, Frederiksen K, Bidstrup P.
Eur J Cancer. 2016 Aug 13;66:67-74. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2016.07.010. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27529756
prospective data … above eight MET h/week compared to lower … overall survival (HR, 0.68; confidence interval [CI]: 0.47-0.99). When comparing participation in exercise to non-participation, … (HR, 0.56; CI: 0.33-0.95). Neither between household nor total PA and overall survival did, we find significant associations.

Melanoma and the Microenvironment--Age Matters.
Wellbrock C.
N Engl J Med. 2016 Aug 18;375(7):696-8. doi: 10.1056/NEJMcibr1606907. No abstract available.
PMID: 27532838 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMcibr1606907
http://sci-hub.cc/10...NEJMcibr1606907
Advancing  age  is  a  risk  factor  for  cancer,  and  
there is no doubt that the accumulation of DNA
damage over time contributes to the correlation
of age with cancer risk: an increase in the num-
ber of oncogenic mutations in precancerous cells
increases the odds of cellular transformation. In
addition,  age-related  changes  in  the  immune  
system can result in reduced adaptive immunity
and  a  protumorigenic  inf lammatory  microenvi-
ronment, which may fuel tumor progression and
contribute to poor prognoses in older persons.
Approximately 50% of persons who receive a
diagnosis of melanoma are older than 65 years
of age, and although the activating mutations in
oncogenes that confer susceptibility to melano
-ma (e.g., BRAF V600E) have been linked with old
age,1  not  much  is  known  about  the  effects  of  
an    aging  microenvironment.  A  study  from  the  
Weeraratna laboratory, reported by Kaur et al.,2
has  shed  some  light  on  how  fibroblasts  in  an  
aging microenvironment can contribute to mela-
noma growth and progression.
Normally, melanocytes occur at the basement
membrane  of  the  epidermal  layer  of  the  skin,  
and although they are usually not in direct con-
tact with dermal fibroblasts, they are exposed to
factors secreted by these cells. During aging, the
architecture  of  the  skin  changes  substantially  
(Fig.  1),  and  the  DNA  of  fibroblasts,  similar  to  
that of melanocytes, accrues damage, the extent
of which is correlated with an altered composi-
tion of secreted proteins. And, with age, fibro-
blasts have a higher tendency to enter senescence,
a state of stable proliferative arrest induced by
cellular stresses such as telomere erosion, DNA
damage, or oncogenic signaling.3
Kaur  et  al.  addressed  the  role  of  the  older  
microenvironment by injecting mouse melanoma
cells  that  had  the  Braf  V600E  driver  mutation  
into immunocompetent young or old mice. The
tumors  in  the  older  mice  grew  much  more  
slowly than those in young mice but with a more
aggressive  phenotype:  the  authors  observed  en-
hanced angiogenesis and a higher number of lung
metastases in the older mice than in the young
mice  (Fig.  1).  Corroborating  observations  were  
made  in  three-dimensional  models  of  human  
skin  containing  fibroblasts  from  either  young  
persons (<35 years of age) or older persons (>55
years of age), in which the fibroblasts from older
persons  had  a  profound  proinvasive  effect  on  
melanoma cells.
Detailed analysis of the fibroblasts from older
persons  revealed  properties  that  not  only  con-
tributed  to  the  prometastatic  activity  but  also  
interfered with the efficacy of BRAF V600E–tar-
geted  therapy.  Older  fibroblasts  produced  high  
amounts  of  secreted  frizzled-related  protein  2  
(sFRP2),  a  secreted  protein,  which  was  detect-
able  in  the  serum  of  the  older  mice  and  when  
administered  to  young  mice,  enhanced  tumor  
angiogenesis  and  lung  metastasis  in  the Braf
V600E  model.  In  addition,  older  fibroblasts  se-
crete lower levels of scavengers of reactive oxygen
species (ROS). Therefore, it seems that melano-
ma cells in the vicinity of older fibroblasts may
have higher levels of oxidative stress than those
in  the  vicinity  of  younger  fibroblasts.  Elevated  
levels  of  sFRP2  reduce  the  ability  of  melanoma  
cells to respond to oxidative stress. So together,
the relative scarcity of scavengers of ROS and the
relative  abundance  of  sFRP2  represent  a  double  
whammy on the oxidative stress levels of mela-
noma cells. Indeed, fibroblasts from older mice
induced a high level of oxidative stress in mela-
noma cells, which in turn led to DNA damage.
Enhanced oxidative stress and DNA damage have
been  linked  not  only  with  a  more  aggressive  
tumor  phenotype  but  also  with  resistance  to  
BRAF-targeted drugs, such as vemurafenib. Kaur
et al. found that allografts of melanoma with the
Braf  V600E  mutation  are  less  sensitive  to  vemu-
rafenib in older mice than in younger mice.
The clinical relevance of this study is support-
ed  by  data  showing  significantly  higher  serum  
levels of sFRP2 in patients with melanoma who
are  older  than  55  years  of  age  than  in  those  
who  are  younger  than  40.  Furthermore,  mela-
noma samples from older patients showed lower
expression  of  oxidative-stress  regulators  and  
higher expression of DNA-damage markers than
samples  from  younger  patients,  a  finding  that  
should be evaluated for its correlation with dis-
ease stage (and hence progression). In the con-
text of BRAF-targeted therapy, the authors tested
whether  age  was  associated  with  response  to  
therapy  in  a  small  cohort  of  patients,  with  the  
idea  that  rate  of  response  might  be  lower  in  
older patients than in younger patients. A com-
parison  of  patients  65  years  of  age  or  younger  
with  those  older  than  65  revealed  a  significant  
difference in the response to therapy.
In summary, Kaur et al. describe a novel mo-
lecular link, involving sFRP2, that connects the
age of the patient with progression and therapy
response  in  melanoma.  Perhaps  pharmacologic  
inhibition  of  sFRP2  would  enhance  tumor  re-
sponse to therapies, such as inhibitors of BRAF,
in  older  patients.  It  is  nevertheless  uncertain  
whether sFRP2 is a candidate biomarker for re-
sponse (or lack thereof ) to BRAF inhibitors, be-
cause  the  cohort  of  patients  was  too  small  for  
investigators to observe a significant association
between sFRP2 level and response to therapy. It
is  also  unclear  whether  the  cutoff  ages  in  the  
different experiments were prespecified, and so
tests of replication by other groups will be im-
portant. The authors proposed that antioxidants
might  be  considered  in  the  treatment  of  older  
patients  with  melanoma,  but  such  an  approach  
would  require  further  investigation:  in  certain  
experimental contexts,4  antioxidants can promote
experimental metastasis. That said, the explora-
tion of age as an inf luence on clinical outcome
in  melanoma  is  stimulating  and  will  no  doubt  
play a role in future studies.
2.   sFRP2 in the aged microenvironment drives melanoma metastasis and therapy resistance.
Kaur A, Webster MR, Marchbank K, Behera R, Ndoye A, Kugel CH 3rd, Dang VM, Appleton J, O'Connell MP, Cheng P, Valiga AA, Morissette R, McDonnell NB, Ferrucci L, Kossenkov AV, Meeth K, Tang HY, Yin X, Wood WH 3rd, Lehrmann E, Becker KG, Flaherty KT, Frederick DT, Wargo JA, Cooper ZA, Tetzlaff MT, Hudgens C, Aird KM, Zhang R, Xu X, Liu Q, Bartlett E, Karakousis G, Eroglu Z, Lo RS, Chan M, Menzies AM, Long GV, Johnson DB, Sosman J, Schilling B, Schadendorf D, Speicher DW, Bosenberg M, Ribas A, Weeraratna AT.
Nature. 2016 Apr 14;532(7598):250-4. doi: 10.1038/nature17392. Epub 2016 Apr 4.
PMID: 27042933
http://sci-hub.cc/10.1038/nature17392
4. Oxidative stress inhibits distant metastasis by human melanoma cells.
Piskounova E, Agathocleous M, Murphy MM, Hu Z, Huddlestun SE, Zhao Z, Leitch AM, Johnson TM, DeBrardinis RJ, Morrison SJ.
Nature. 2015 Nov 12;527(7577):186-91. doi: 10.1038/nature15726. Epub 2015 Oct 14.
PMID: 26466563
Free PMC Article
https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4644103/

The effect of dietary sodium modification on blood pressure in adults with systolic blood pressure less than 140 mmHg: a systematic review.
Kelly J, Khalesi S, Dickinson K, Hines S, Coombes JS, Todd AS.
JBI Database System Rev Implement Rep. 2016 Jun;14(6):196-237.
PMID: 27532658
[The not pdf-availed paper seems to say for those without hypertension, low sodium intake does not help for blood pressure reduction.]

"curcumin, which constitutes 3.14% (on average) of powdered turmeric.[11] "
https://en.wikipedia...cal_composition
Efficacy of Turmeric Extracts and Curcumin for Alleviating the Symptoms of Joint Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials.
Daily JW, Yang M, Park S.
J Med Food. 2016 Aug;19(8):717-729.
PMID: 27533649
RCTs provide scientific evidence that supports the efficacy of turmeric extract (about 1000 mg/day of curcumin) in the treatment of arthritis.

The Prevalence of Resident-to-Resident Elder Mistreatment in Nursing Homes.
Lachs MS, Teresi JA, Ramirez M, van Haitsma K, Silver S, Eimicke JP, Boratgis G, Sukha G, Kong J, Besas AM, Luna MR, Pillemer KA.
Ann Intern Med. 2016 Aug 16;165(4):229-36. doi: 10.7326/M15-1209. Epub 2016 Jun 14.
PMID: 27295575
[You or your loved one may end up in such patients and the study is not prospective  and does not describe how mistreatment affects those subjected to it, but does say there can be injuries and popular press reports give accounts of deaths also.  The pdfs are pdf-availed.]
Resident-to-resident elder mistreatment (R-REM) … 407 of 2011 residents experienced at least 1 R-REM event; the total 1-month prevalence was 20.2% (95% CI, 18.1% to 22.5%). The most common forms were verbal (9.1% [CI, 7.7% to 10.8%]), other (such as invasion of privacy or menacing gestures) (5.3% [CI, 4.4% to 6.4%]), physical (5.2% [CI, 4.1% to 6.5%]), and sexual (0.6% [CI, 0.3% to 1.1%]).
Elder Abuse in Nursing Homes: How Do We Advance the Field of Elder Justice?
Dong X.
Ann Intern Med. 2016 Aug 16;165(4):288-9. doi: 10.7326/M16-1161. Epub 2016 Jun 14. No abstract available.
PMID: 27294410

Normal-Weight Central Obesity: Implications for Total and Cardiovascular Mortality.
Sahakyan KR, Somers VK, Rodriguez-Escudero JP, Hodge DO, Carter RE, Sochor O, Coutinho T, Jensen MD, Roger VL, Singh P, Lopez-Jimenez F.
Ann Intern Med. 2015 Dec 1;163(11):827-35. doi: 10.7326/M14-2525. Epub 2015 Nov 10.
PMID: 26551006
[follow-up of 14.3 years]
a man with a normal BMI (22 kg/m2) and central obesity had greater total mortality risk than one with similar BMI but no central obesity (hazard ratio  , 1.87 [95% CI, 1.53 to 2.29]), and this man had twice the mortality risk of participants who were overweight or obese according to BMI only (HR, 2.24 [CI, 1.52 to 3.32] and 2.42 [CI, 1.30 to 4.53], respectively). Women with normal-weight central obesity also had a higher mortality risk than those with similar BMI but no central obesity (HR, 1.48 [CI, 1.35 to 1.62]) and those who were obese according to BMI only (HR, 1.32 [CI, 1.15 to 1.51]). Expected survival estimates were consistently lower for those with central obesity when age and BMI were controlled for.
Comment in
The Many Paradoxes of Our Modern World: Is There Really an Obesity Paradox or Is It Only a Matter of Adiposity Assessment?
Poirier P.
Ann Intern Med. 2015 Dec 1;163(11):880-1. doi: 10.7326/M15-2435. Epub 2015 Nov 10. No abstract available.
PMID: 26551376
Fat middle section is less healthy than being obese, say researchers.
Wise J.
BMJ. 2015 Nov 9;351:h5975. doi: 10.1136/bmj.h5975. No abstract available.
PMID: 26556679
http://sci-hub.cc/10.1136/bmj.h5975
Summary for patients in
Summaries for Patients. Normal-Weight Central Obesity and Mortality.
[No authors listed]
Ann Intern Med. 2015 Dec 1;163(11):I-30. doi: 10.7326/P15-9040. Epub 2015 Nov 10. No abstract available.
PMID: 26551531
http://annals.org/ar...ticleid=2468809
Letters
Normal-Weight Central Obesity and Mortality Risk.
Yu Y.
Ann Intern Med. 2016 Aug 16;165(4):298. doi: 10.7326/L16-0074. No abstract available.
PMID:  27538167
Normal-Weight Central Obesity and Mortality Risk.
Carter RE, Hodge DO, Lopez-Jimenez F.
Ann Intern Med. 2016 Aug 16;165(4):298-299. doi: 10.7326/L16-0073. No abstract available.
PMID: 27538166



#7 AlPater

AlPater
  • Member
  • 1,120 posts
  • Website URL:https://www.crsociety.org/index.php?app=core&amp;amp;module=global&amp;amp;section=register

Posted 20 August 2016 - 08:03 PM

Alcohol intake, drinking patterns, and prostate cancer risk and mortality: a 30-year prospective cohort study of Finnish twins.

Dickerman BA, Markt SC, Koskenvuo M, Pukkala E, Mucci LA, Kaprio J.

Cancer Causes Control. 2016 Sep;27(9):1049-58. doi: 10.1007/s10552-016-0778-6. Epub 2016 Jun 28.

PMID:  27351919

http://sci-hub.cc/10...0552-016-0778-6

Compared to light drinkers (≤3 drinks/week; non-abstainers), heavy drinkers (>14 drinks/week) were at a 1.46-fold higher risk (HR 1.46; 95 % CI 1.12, 1.91) ... Among current drinkers, binge drinkers were at a significantly increased risk of prostate cancer (HR 1.28; 95 % CI 1.06, 1.55) compared to non-binge drinkers. Abstainers were at a 1.90-fold higher risk (HR 1.90; 95 % CI 1.04, 3.47)

 

Nature | Editorial

ExAC project pins down rare gene variants.

[No authors listed]

Nature. 2016 Aug 17;536(7616):249. doi: 10.1038/536249a. No abstract available.

PMID: 27535499

http://www.nature.co...ariants-1.20425

More than one million people have now had their genome sequenced, or its protein-coding regions (the exome). … only a small fraction of these data are publicly available. … Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC)… from some 60,000 people … is already a crucial resource (http://exac.broadinstitute.org).

Related stories

Human genomics: A deep dive into genetic variation.

Shendure J.

Nature. 2016 Aug 17;536(7616):277-8. doi: 10.1038/536277a. No abstract available.

PMID: 27535530

http://sci-hub.cc/10.1038/536277a

Analysis of protein-coding genetic variation in 60,706 humans.

Lek M, Karczewski KJ, Minikel EV, Samocha KE, Banks E, Fennell T, O'Donnell-Luria AH, Ware JS, Hill AJ, Cummings BB, Tukiainen T, Birnbaum DP, Kosmicki JA, Duncan LE, Estrada K, Zhao F, Zou J, Pierce-Hoffman E, Berghout J, Cooper DN, Deflaux N, DePristo M, Do R, Flannick J, Fromer M, Gauthier L, Goldstein J, Gupta N, Howrigan D, Kiezun A, Kurki MI, Moonshine AL, Natarajan P, Orozco L, Peloso GM, Poplin R, Rivas MA, Ruano-Rubio V, Rose SA, Ruderfer DM, Shakir K, Stenson PD, Stevens C, Thomas BP, Tiao G, Tusie-Luna MT, Weisburd B, Won HH, Yu D, Altshuler DM, Ardissino D, Boehnke M, Danesh J, Donnelly S, Elosua R, Florez JC, Gabriel SB, Getz G, Glatt SJ, Hultman CM, Kathiresan S, Laakso M, McCarroll S, McCarthy MI, McGovern D, McPherson R, Neale BM, Palotie A, Purcell SM, Saleheen D, Scharf JM, Sklar P, Sullivan PF, Tuomilehto J, Tsuang MT, Watkins HC, Wilson JG, Daly MJ, MacArthur DG; Exome Aggregation Consortium.

Nature. 2016 Aug 17;536(7616):285-291. doi: 10.1038/nature19057.

PMID: 27535533

http://sci-hub.cc/10.1038/nature19057

Nature | News

Protective gene offers hope for next blockbuster heart drug

Rare genetic variant in Icelanders lowers risk of heart attack by more than one-third.

Ewen Callaway

19 May 2016

http://www.nature.co...rt-drug-1.19952

http://www.nature.co...=www.nature.com

 

Human Genetics

Genetic variation and coronary artery disease

Laura M. Zahn

Most genetic variants lie outside protein-coding genes, but their effects, especially in human health, are not well understood. Franzén et al. examined gene expression in tissues affected by coronary artery disease (CAD). They found that individuals with loci that have been associated with CAD in genome-wide analyses had different patterns of tissue-specific gene expression than individuals without these genetic variants. Similarly, tissues not associated with CAD did not have CAD-like expression patterns. Thus, tissue-specific data can be used to dissect the genetic effects that predispose individuals to CAD.

Science, this issue p. 827

http://science.scien.../353/6301/786.4

Cardiometabolic risk loci share downstream cis- and trans-gene regulation across tissues and diseases

Oscar Franzén, Raili Ermel, Ariella Cohain, Nicholas K. Akers, Antonio Di Narzo, Husain A. Talukdar, Hassan Foroughi-Asl, Claudia Giambartolomei, John F. Fullard, Katyayani Sukhavasi, Sulev Köks, Li-Ming Gan, Chiara Giannarelli, Jason C. Kovacic, Christer Betsholtz, Bojan Losic, Tom Michoel, Ke Hao, Panos Roussos, Josefin Skogsberg, Arno Ruusalepp, Eric E. Schadt, Johan L. M. Björkegren

Science 19 Aug 2016 : 827-830

http://sci-hub.cc/10...science.aad6970

 

Protein quality as determined by the Digestible Indispensable Amino Acid Score: evaluation of factors underlying the calculation.

Wolfe RR, Rutherfurd SM, Kim IY, Moughan PJ.

Nutr Rev. 2016 Jul 24. pii: nuw022. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID: 27452871

http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/nutrit/nuw022

circumstances such as aging, athletic performance, and

serious illness may also influence both the amount and

profile of the optimal amounts of IAA intake,5

5. Optimal protein intake in the elderly.

Wolfe RR, Miller SL, Miller KB.

Clin Nutr. 2008 Oct;27(5):675-84. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2008.06.008. Epub 2008 Sep 25. Review.

PMID: 18819733

http://sci-hub.cc/10...lnu.2008.06.008

1.5 g protein/kg/day, or about 15-20% of total caloric intake

 

Reproduction Does Not Adversely Affect Liver Mitochondrial Respiratory Function but Results in Lipid Peroxidation and Increased Antioxidants in House Mice.

Mowry AV, Kavazis AN, Sirman AE, Potts WK, Hood WR.

PLoS One. 2016 Aug 18;11(8):e0160883. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0160883. eCollection 2016.

PMID: 27537547

http://journals.plos...al.pone.0160883

Despite increased oxidative damage (p = 0.05) and elevated CuZnSOD (p = 0.002) and catalase (p = 0.04) protein levels … post-reproductive, maintenance state the mitochondrial coupling … trend (p = 0.059) to suggest increased maximal oxygen consumption by liver mitochondria

 

[The below paper is not pdf-availed.]

Omega-3 fatty acids (ῳ-3 fatty acids) in epilepsy: animal models and human clinical trials.

DeGiorgio CM, Taha A.

Expert Rev Neurother. 2016 Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27534261

Phase II RCT evidence suggests that low to moderate dose ῳ-3 fatty acids reduce seizures

 

Atrial fibrillation and stroke: unrecognised and undertreated

http://sci-hub.cc/10...6736(16)31412-x

See Articles page 761

See Series pages 806, 818, and 829

For the Lancet Articles on occurrence of death and stroke see http://www.thelancet...t/issue/current

 

Weighing up dietary patterns - The Lancet

http://www.thelancet...ulltext?rss=yes

http://www.thelancet...ulltext?rss=yes

JB-M reports non-financial support from Glycemic Index Foundation and Sydney University Glycemic Index Research Service (SUGiRS), and royalties from books about glycaemic index. DJAJ consults with the food industry and has received research funding. His wife is Scientific Director of Glycemic Index Laboratories. GL holds shares in Independent Nutrition Logic, UK, a company that works with a wide range of food companies, academics, health professionals, and governmental organisations, some of which seek information and advice about glycaemic index.

http://www.thelancet...(16)31337-X.pdf



#8 AlPater

AlPater
  • Member
  • 1,120 posts
  • Website URL:https://www.crsociety.org/index.php?app=core&amp;amp;module=global&amp;amp;section=register

Posted 21 August 2016 - 01:31 PM

Reproduction Does Not Adversely Affect Liver Mitochondrial Respiratory Function but Results in Lipid Peroxidation and Increased Antioxidants in House Mice.
Mowry AV, Kavazis AN, Sirman AE, Potts WK, Hood WR.
PLoS One. 2016 Aug 18;11(8):e0160883. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0160883. eCollection 2016.
PMID: 27537547
http://journals.plos...al.pone.0160883
[The title seems enough information for this paper.]

[The below paper is not pdf-availed.]
Omega-3 fatty acids (ῳ-3 fatty acids) in epilepsy: animal models and human clinical trials.
DeGiorgio CM, Taha A.
Expert Rev Neurother. 2016 Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27534261
Phase II RCT evidence suggests that low to moderate dose ῳ-3 fatty acids reduce seizures

Atrial fibrillation and stroke: unrecognised and undertreated
http://sci-hub.cc/10...6736(16)31412-x
See Articles page 761
See Series pages 806, 818, and 829
For the Lancet Articles on occurrence of death and stroke see http://www.thelancet...t/issue/current
[I kind of thought that the stor(ies) were a given.]

Weighing up dietary patterns - The Lancet
http://www.thelancet...ulltext?rss=yes
http://www.thelancet...(16)31337-X.pdf
[The paper seems to suggest throwing in the towel on diets to lose weight long term and a healthy diet (such as a low glycemic index diet?) is better.]
JB-M reports non-financial support from Glycemic Index Foundation and Sydney University Glycemic Index Research Service (SUGiRS), and royalties from books about glycaemic index. DJAJ consults with the food industry and has received research funding. His wife is Scientific Director of Glycemic Index Laboratories. GL holds shares in Independent Nutrition Logic, UK, a company that works with a wide range of food companies, academics, health professionals, and governmental organisations, some of which seek information and advice about glycaemic index.

https://en.wikipedia...urgh_compound_B“is a radioactive analog of thioflavin T, which can be used in positron emission tomography scans to image beta-amyloid plaques in neuronal tissue.”
Predicting Alzheimer disease from a blood-based biomarker profile: A 54-month follow-up.
Burnham SC, Rowe CC, Baker D, Bush AI, Doecke JD, Faux NG, Laws SM, Martins RN, Maruff P, Macaulay SL, Rainey-Smith S, Savage G, Ames D, Masters CL, Wilson W, Villemagne VL.
Neurology. 2016 Aug 17. pii: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000003094. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27534714
http://sci-hub.cc/10...000000000003094
Twelve percent of HCs with estimated high NAB progressed in comparison to 5% of HCs with estimated low NAB (odds ratio = 2.4). Forty percent of the participants with MCI who had estimated high NAB progressed in comparison to 5% of the participants with MCI who had estimated low NAB (odds ratio = 12.3). These ratios are in line with those reported for Pittsburgh compound B-PET results.

Consumption of whole grains in relation to mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes: Dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
Li B, Zhang G, Tan M, Zhao L, Jin L, Tang X, Jiang G, Zhong K.
Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Aug;95(33):e4229.
PMID: 27537552
[The paper is pdf-availed and trends seemed to be beneficial for stroke and diabetes, especially the latter for which there were few subjects.]
0.93 (95% confidence intervals [CIs]: 0.91-0.95; Pheterogeneity < 0.001) for all-cause mortality, 0.95 (95% CIs: 0.92-0.98; Pheterogeneity < 0.001) for CVD-specific mortality, and 0.92 (95% CIs: 0.88-0.97; Pheterogeneity < 0.001) for CHD-specific mortality for an increment of 1 serving (30 g) a day of whole grain intake. The combined estimates were robust across subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Higher consumption of whole grains was not appreciably associated with risk of mortality from stroke and diabetes.

[The below papers seem to say that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is associated with obesity and sudden cardiac death, is prevented with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy.  The mechanism involves potassium channels.]
Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Circulating Potassium Channel Levels
http://jaha.ahajourn.../8/e003666.full
Disclosures
A provisional patent has been submitted based on this work.
Ion Channel Remodeling—A Potential Mechanism Linking Sleep Apnea and Sudden Cardiac Death
http://jaha.ahajourn.../e004195?cpetoc
Disclosures
Somers declares that he has received grant support from a Philips Respironics Foundation gift to Mayo Foundation; is a consultant for GlaxoSmithKline, Price Waterhouse Coopers, ResMed, Respicardia, Rhonda Grey, Dane Garvin, Philips, and U‐Health; and is working with Mayo Health Solutions and their industry partners on intellectual property related to sleep and CVD.

Metabolic shifts and structural changes in the gut microbiota upon branched-chain amino acid supplementation in middle-aged mice.
Yang Z, Huang S, Zou D, Dong D, He X, Liu N, Liu W, Huang L.
Amino Acids. 2016 Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27539648
BCAAem-supplementation in mice slowed the change speed of gut microbiota which is due to age. … lower serum concentrations of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein[LBP]. The changes are indicative of lower antigen loads in the host gut. These results suggest that dietary supplementation with BCAAem may be considered for improving health and promoting healthy aging.
[The paper is pdf-availed.]
[Fig. 4 Serum LBP concentrations in the two groups at 11 and
15 months. …. At 15 months, in the sup-plemented group and control group, the LBP concentrations were
20.3 and 39.7 μg/ml, respectively, the P value was 2.68E−14]

Association between serum thyrotropin levels and mortality among euthyroid adults in the United States.
Inoue K, Tsujimoto T, Saito J, Sugiyama T.
Thyroid. 2016 Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27539006
[The below paper is pdf-availed.]
all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio  , 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.47) and cardiovascular (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.02-1.67) and cancer mortality (HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.01-2.01) was observed in the high normal TSH group than in the medium normal TSH group. Additionally, the low normal TSH group had an increased risk of all-cause mortality. In stratum-specific analyses, we found a significant association between high normal TSH levels and all-cause mortality among males, females, and participants < 60 years. Continuous NHANES cohorts demonstrated a non-significant increase in the HR for all-cause mortality in the high normal TSH group. [1.17 (1.02–1.35)

Effect of vitamin D supplementation on cardiovascular disease risk factors and exercise performance in healthy participants: a randomized placebo-controlled preliminary study.
Al-Dujaili EA, Munir N, Iniesta RR.
Ther Adv Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Aug;7(4):153-65. doi: 10.1177/2042018816653357. Epub 2016 Jun 20.
PMID: 27540461
https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4973406/
https://www.ncbi.nlm...18816653357.pdf
A randomized placebo-controlled single-blinded parallel trial was conducted in healthy participants (n = 15). They received 2000 IU (50 µg) vitamin D3 per day (n = 9) or placebo (lactose) (n = 6) for 14 days. … systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and arterial elasticity (as measured by pulse wave velocity, PWV) were recorded at baseline, day 7 and day 14 of intervention. … rate of perceived exertion (RPE) … at day 14, vitamin D supplementation significantly reduced SBP and DBP from 115.8 ± 17.1 and 75.4 ± 10.3 at baseline to 106.3 ± 10.9 (p = 0.022) and 68.5 ± 10.1 mmHg (p = 0.012) respectively. Also arterial stiffness was markedly reduced in the vitamin D group (from 7.45 ± 1.55 to 6.11 ± 1.89, p = 0.049). .... Exercise-induced SBP and DBP were significantly reduced post vitamin D intake from 130.7 ± 12.2 to 116.1 ± 8.1 (p = 0.012) and from 76.2 ± 8.4 to 70.5 ± 7.7 mmHg (p = 0.042) respectively. The distance cycled in 20 minutes significantly increased from 4.98 ± 2.65 to 6.51 ± 2.28km (p = 0.020), while the Borg Scale RPE reduced from 5.13 ± 1.36 to 4.25 ± 0.71 RPE (p = 0.021).

Dietary Vitamin E Is More Effective than Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acid for Improving The Kinematic Characteristics of Rat Sperm.
Alizadeh A, Taleb Z, Ebrahimi B, Esmaeili V, Shaverdi A, Nasr J, Kheimeh A, Yazdi RS.
Cell J. 2016 Jul-Sep;18(2):262-70. Epub 2016 May 30.
https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4988426/
https://www.ncbi.nlm...ll-J-18-262.pdf
PMID: 27540532
vitamin E (VITE) and fatty acid (FA) … i. Control (CTR): standard diet; ii. Vitamin E diet (VITE): 2 times greater than recommendations; iii. Sunflower oil group (n-6) [gavaged with 0.5 ml/day/rat sunflower oil+VITE diet]; iv. Fish oil group (n-3): [gavaged with 0.5 ml/day/rat fish oil+VITE diet] and v. n-3+n-6 group [gavaged with 0.3 ml fish oil/day/rat+0.2 ml sunflower oil/day/rat+VITE diet]. … Feed intake decreased in groups which were administered sunflower oil compared with the other groups (P<0.05). The groups which received only VITE or fish oil+VITE had a significantly higher concentration of sperm compared with the n-6+n-3 and CTR group (P<0.05). VITE and n-3 showed significant improved progressive motility compared to the CTR group, whereas the n-6 and n-6+n-3 groups were in the middle (P<0.05). The highest sperm kinematic parameters were observed in the VITE only group. There was no strong correlation between sperm parameters and blood lipid profiles.

https://www.scienced...60818093425.htm
Association of Adipose Tissue Fatty Acids With Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality in Elderly Men.
Iggman D, Ärnlöv J, Cederholm T, Risérus U.
JAMA Cardiol. 2016 Aug 17. doi: 10.1001/jamacardio.2016.2259. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27541681
http://sci-hub.cc/10...ardio.2016.2259
 (median follow-up, 14.8 years). … age 71 years, 1221 (73%) of the 1681 invited men participated. … Cox proportional hazards regression analyses, … none of the 4 primary fatty acids were associated with cardiovascular mortality (HR, 0.92-1.05 for each standard deviation increase; P ≥ .27). Linoleic acid was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.98; P = .02) and directly associated with intake (P < .001). In secondary analyses, palmitoleic acid, 16:1n-7 (HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.02-1.21; P = .02) was associated with higher all-cause mortality, whereas heptadecanoic acid, 17:0, tended to be associated with lower all-cause mortality (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.79-1.00; P = .05). Arachidonic:linoleic acid ratio was associated with both cardiovascular (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05-1.31; P = .04) and all-cause (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.04-1.23; P = .005) mortality.

Fatigue is associated with excess mortality in the general population: results from the EPIC-Norfolk study.
Basu N, Yang X, Luben RN, Whibley D, Macfarlane GJ, Wareham NJ, Khaw KT, Myint PK.
BMC Med. 2016 Aug 20;14(1):122.
PMID: 27543008
https://bmcmedicine....2916-016-0662-y
hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality was 1.40 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.25-1.56) for those reporting the highest fatigue (bottom SF36-VT quartile) compared with those reporting the lowest fatigue (top SF36-VT quartile). This significant association was specifically observed for those deaths related to cardiovascular disease (HR 1.45, 95 % CI 1.18-1.78) but not cancer (HR 1.09, 95 % CI 0.90-1.32). Of the considered mechanisms, thyroid function was most notable for attenuating this association. The risk of all-cause mortality, however, remained significant even after considering all putative confounders and mechanisms (HR 1.26, 95 % CI 1.10-1.45).
[unadjusted mortality risk of high fatigue (HR 1.63, 95 % CI 1.40–.89) is similar to being a current smoker (HR 1.35, 95 % CI 1.24–1.48 ]

Regional aging and longevity characteristics in China.
Wang L, Li Y, Li H, Holdaway J, Hao Z, Wang W, Krafft T.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 Aug 12;67:153-159. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2016.08.002. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27544461
http://linkinghub.el...167494316301406
[Not a prospective study but the centenarian subjects have done something right compared to their younger compatriots who are unlikely to live so long.  Although health care systems and economic well-being are considered, healthy, lower calorie foods with less spices and fats and lots of vegetables and fruit play big in the paper.]
influence of economic development … regions with higher socio-economic development and that have a favorable climate. Centenarian distribution pattern is less influenced by economic but only for few regions. Lifestyle factors, such as sufficient sleep, positive mental state and a light diet

Dietary n-3 PUFA, fish consumption and depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.
Grosso G, Micek A, Marventano S, Castellano S, Mistretta A, Pajak A, Galvano F.
J Affect Disord. 2016 Aug 16;205:269-281. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.08.011. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27544316
http://sci-hub.cc/10...jad.2016.08.011
[It seemed that fish and fish fats were more beneficial in Europe than Asia or USA and less beneficial in high quality studies.]
fish consumption and depression resulted in significant reduced risk (RR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.69, 0.89), with a linear dose-response … total n-3 PUFA and fish-derived n-3 PUFA [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)+docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] resulted in decreased risk for the highest compared with the lowest intake (RR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.92 and RR=0.82, 95% CI: 0.73, 0.92, respectively) and dose-response analysis revealed a J-shaped association with a peak decreased risk for 1.8g/d intake of n-3 PUFA (RR=0.30, 95% CI: 0.09, 0.98).

The impact of liquid preloads varying in macronutrient content on postprandial kinetics of amino acids relative to appetite in healthy adults.
Korompokis K, Östman E, Dougkas A.
Appetite. 2016 Aug 17. pii: S0195-6663(16)30415-9. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2016.08.099. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 27544805
amino acid concentrations peaked at 90 min after all preloads and returned to the baseline values until 210 min. Protein intake affected amino acid profiles (P < 0.05), while no differences (P > 0.05) were detected between the two high protein preloads despite the different CHO:fat ratio (40%/0.4 CHO:fat and 40%/3.6 CHO:fat) … glutamate was positively associated with prospective consumption and inversely related to ghrelin (P < 0.05). Valine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine and α-aminobutyric acid were inversely associated with energy intake (P < 0.05).
[From the full-text, which is availed, I thought the most interesting results were:]
“The impact of individual postprandial AA responses in combination with GLP-1, ghrelin, insulin and glucose on appetite sensations and appetite-related hormones was estimated. No significant associations of the total AA and gut hormones with the appetite sensations were found (P > 0.05), while there was a modest positive relationship of insulin with hunger (β = 0.009; P = 0.03) and an inverse relationship of glucose with desire to eat (β = −13.90; P = 0.04) and hunger (β = −15.51; P = 0.03) ( Table 7). The responses of the rest of AA were not related to appetite responses (data not shown). Only glutamate tended to have an effect on the desire to eat (β = 0.047; P = 0.06), but glucose had a greater inverse effect (β = −15.78; P = 0.015). Additionally, prospective consumption was positively influenced by glutamate (β = 0.012; P = 0.03). Regarding the influence of AA on energy intake, the total AA concentration as well as the majority of the concentration of individual AA did not relate to ad libitum energy intake. However, histidine (β = 0.01; P = 0.04) was positively related to energy intake, whereas valine (β = −0.01; P = 0.04), lysine (β = −0.01; P = 0.01), leucine (β = −0.01; P 0.02), isoleucine (β = −0.04; P = 0.03) and α-aminobutyric acid (β = −0.06; P = 0.03) had an inverse association with energy intake. As far as hormone responses are concerned, only glutamate had a significant inverse association with ghrelin (β = −0.65; P = 0.025), while GLP-1 and insulin were unaffected by the circulating AA (data not shown).”
 


Edited by AlPater, 22 August 2016 - 08:54 PM.


#9 AlPater

AlPater
  • Member
  • 1,120 posts
  • Website URL:https://www.crsociety.org/index.php?app=core&amp;amp;module=global&amp;amp;section=register

Posted 22 August 2016 - 08:45 PM

aaa

 

 

bbb

 

Reproduction Does Not Adversely Affect Liver Mitochondrial Respiratory Function but Results in Lipid Peroxidation and Increased Antioxidants in House Mice.

Mowry AV, Kavazis AN, Sirman AE, Potts WK, Hood WR.

PLoS One. 2016 Aug 18;11(8):e0160883. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0160883. eCollection 2016.

PMID: 27537547

http://journals.plos...al.pone.0160883

[The title seems enough information for this paper.]

 

[The below paper is not pdf-availed.]

Omega-3 fatty acids (ῳ-3 fatty acids) in epilepsy: animal models and human clinical trials.

DeGiorgio CM, Taha A.

Expert Rev Neurother. 2016 Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27534261

Phase II RCT evidence suggests that low to moderate dose ῳ-3 fatty acids reduce seizures

 

Atrial fibrillation and stroke: unrecognised and undertreated

http://sci-hub.cc/10...6736(16)31412-x

See Articles page 761

See Series pages 806, 818, and 829

For the Lancet Articles on occurrence of death and stroke see http://www.thelancet...t/issue/current

[I kind of thought that the stor(ies) were a given.]

 

Weighing up dietary patterns - The Lancet

http://www.thelancet...ulltext?rss=yes

http://www.thelancet...(16)31337-X.pdf

[The paper seems to suggest throwing in the towel on diets to lose weight long term and a healthy diet (such as a low glycemic index diet?) is better.]

JB-M reports non-financial support from Glycemic Index Foundation and Sydney University Glycemic Index Research Service (SUGiRS), and royalties from books about glycaemic index. DJAJ consults with the food industry and has received research funding. His wife is Scientific Director of Glycemic Index Laboratories. GL holds shares in Independent Nutrition Logic, UK, a company that works with a wide range of food companies, academics, health professionals, and governmental organisations, some of which seek information and advice about glycaemic index.

 

https://en.wikipedia...urgh_compound_B“is a radioactive analog of thioflavin T, which can be used in positron emission tomography scans to image beta-amyloid plaques in neuronal tissue.”

Predicting Alzheimer disease from a blood-based biomarker profile: A 54-month follow-up.

Burnham SC, Rowe CC, Baker D, Bush AI, Doecke JD, Faux NG, Laws SM, Martins RN, Maruff P, Macaulay SL, Rainey-Smith S, Savage G, Ames D, Masters CL, Wilson W, Villemagne VL.

Neurology. 2016 Aug 17. pii: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000003094. [Epub ahead of print]

 

PMID: 27534714

http://sci-hub.cc/10...000000000003094

Twelve percent of HCs with estimated high NAB progressed in comparison to 5% of HCs with estimated low NAB (odds ratio = 2.4). Forty percent of the participants with MCI who had estimated high NAB progressed in comparison to 5% of the participants with MCI who had estimated low NAB (odds ratio = 12.3). These ratios are in line with those reported for Pittsburgh compound B-PET results.

 

Consumption of whole grains in relation to mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes: Dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

Li B, Zhang G, Tan M, Zhao L, Jin L, Tang X, Jiang G, Zhong K.

Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Aug;95(33):e4229.

PMID: 27537552

[The paper is pdf-availed and trends seemed to be beneficial for stroke and diabetes, especially the latter for which there were few subjects.]

0.93 (95% confidence intervals [CIs]: 0.91-0.95; Pheterogeneity < 0.001) for all-cause mortality, 0.95 (95% CIs: 0.92-0.98; Pheterogeneity < 0.001) for CVD-specific mortality, and 0.92 (95% CIs: 0.88-0.97; Pheterogeneity < 0.001) for CHD-specific mortality for an increment of 1 serving (30 g) a day of whole grain intake. The combined estimates were robust across subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Higher consumption of whole grains was not appreciably associated with risk of mortality from stroke and diabetes.

 

[The below papers seem to say that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is associated with obesity and sudden cardiac death, is prevented with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy.  The mechanism involves potassium channels.]

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Circulating Potassium Channel Levels

http://jaha.ahajourn.../8/e003666.full

Disclosures

A provisional patent has been submitted based on this work.

Ion Channel Remodeling—A Potential Mechanism Linking Sleep Apnea and Sudden Cardiac Death

http://jaha.ahajourn.../e004195?cpetoc

Disclosures

Somers declares that he has received grant support from a Philips Respironics Foundation gift to Mayo Foundation; is a consultant for GlaxoSmithKline, Price Waterhouse Coopers, ResMed, Respicardia, Rhonda Grey, Dane Garvin, Philips, and U‐Health; and is working with Mayo Health Solutions and their industry partners on intellectual property related to sleep and CVD.

 

Metabolic shifts and structural changes in the gut microbiota upon branched-chain amino acid supplementation in middle-aged mice.

Yang Z, Huang S, Zou D, Dong D, He X, Liu N, Liu W, Huang L.

Amino Acids. 2016 Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27539648

BCAAem-supplementation in mice slowed the change speed of gut microbiota which is due to age. … lower serum concentrations of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein[LBP]. The changes are indicative of lower antigen loads in the host gut. These results suggest that dietary supplementation with BCAAem may be considered for improving health and promoting healthy aging.

[The paper is pdf-availed.]

[Fig. 4 Serum LBP concentrations in the two groups at 11 and

15 months. …. At 15 months, in the sup-plemented group and control group, the LBP concentrations were

20.3 and 39.7 μg/ml, respectively, the P value was 2.68E−14]

 

Association between serum thyrotropin levels and mortality among euthyroid adults in the United States.

Inoue K, Tsujimoto T, Saito J, Sugiyama T.

Thyroid. 2016 Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27539006

[The below paper is pdf-availed.]

all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio  , 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.47) and cardiovascular (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.02-1.67) and cancer mortality (HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.01-2.01) was observed in the high normal TSH group than in the medium normal TSH group. Additionally, the low normal TSH group had an increased risk of all-cause mortality. In stratum-specific analyses, we found a significant association between high normal TSH levels and all-cause mortality among males, females, and participants < 60 years. Continuous NHANES cohorts demonstrated a non-significant increase in the HR for all-cause mortality in the high normal TSH group. [1.17 (1.02–1.35)

 

Effect of vitamin D supplementation on cardiovascular disease risk factors and exercise performance in healthy participants: a randomized placebo-controlled preliminary study.

Al-Dujaili EA, Munir N, Iniesta RR.

Ther Adv Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Aug;7(4):153-65. doi: 10.1177/2042018816653357. Epub 2016 Jun 20.

PMID: 27540461

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4973406/

https://www.ncbi.nlm...18816653357.pdf

A randomized placebo-controlled single-blinded parallel trial was conducted in healthy participants (n = 15). They received 2000 IU (50 µg) vitamin D3 per day (n = 9) or placebo (lactose) (n = 6) for 14 days. … systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and arterial elasticity (as measured by pulse wave velocity, PWV) were recorded at baseline, day 7 and day 14 of intervention. … rate of perceived exertion (RPE) … at day 14, vitamin D supplementation significantly reduced SBP and DBP from 115.8 ± 17.1 and 75.4 ± 10.3 at baseline to 106.3 ± 10.9 (p = 0.022) and 68.5 ± 10.1 mmHg (p = 0.012) respectively. Also arterial stiffness was markedly reduced in the vitamin D group (from 7.45 ± 1.55 to 6.11 ± 1.89, p = 0.049). .... Exercise-induced SBP and DBP were significantly reduced post vitamin D intake from 130.7 ± 12.2 to 116.1 ± 8.1 (p = 0.012) and from 76.2 ± 8.4 to 70.5 ± 7.7 mmHg (p = 0.042) respectively. The distance cycled in 20 minutes significantly increased from 4.98 ± 2.65 to 6.51 ± 2.28km (p = 0.020), while the Borg Scale RPE reduced from 5.13 ± 1.36 to 4.25 ± 0.71 RPE (p = 0.021).

 

Dietary Vitamin E Is More Effective than Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acid for Improving The Kinematic Characteristics of Rat Sperm.

Alizadeh A, Taleb Z, Ebrahimi B, Esmaeili V, Shaverdi A, Nasr J, Kheimeh A, Yazdi RS.

Cell J. 2016 Jul-Sep;18(2):262-70. Epub 2016 May 30.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4988426/

https://www.ncbi.nlm...ll-J-18-262.pdf

PMID: 27540532

vitamin E (VITE) and fatty acid (FA) … i. Control (CTR): standard diet; ii. Vitamin E diet (VITE): 2 times greater than recommendations; iii. Sunflower oil group (n-6) [gavaged with 0.5 ml/day/rat sunflower oil+VITE diet]; iv. Fish oil group (n-3): [gavaged with 0.5 ml/day/rat fish oil+VITE diet] and v. n-3+n-6 group [gavaged with 0.3 ml fish oil/day/rat+0.2 ml sunflower oil/day/rat+VITE diet]. … Feed intake decreased in groups which were administered sunflower oil compared with the other groups (P<0.05). The groups which received only VITE or fish oil+VITE had a significantly higher concentration of sperm compared with the n-6+n-3 and CTR group (P<0.05). VITE and n-3 showed significant improved progressive motility compared to the CTR group, whereas the n-6 and n-6+n-3 groups were in the middle (P<0.05). The highest sperm kinematic parameters were observed in the VITE only group. There was no strong correlation between sperm parameters and blood lipid profiles.

 

https://www.scienced...60818093425.htm

Association of Adipose Tissue Fatty Acids With Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality in Elderly Men.

Iggman D, Ärnlöv J, Cederholm T, Risérus U.

JAMA Cardiol. 2016 Aug 17. doi: 10.1001/jamacardio.2016.2259. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27541681

http://sci-hub.cc/10...ardio.2016.2259

 (median follow-up, 14.8 years). … age 71 years, 1221 (73%) of the 1681 invited men participated. … Cox proportional hazards regression analyses, … none of the 4 primary fatty acids were associated with cardiovascular mortality (HR, 0.92-1.05 for each standard deviation increase; P ≥ .27). Linoleic acid was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.98; P = .02) and directly associated with intake (P < .001). In secondary analyses, palmitoleic acid, 16:1n-7 (HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.02-1.21; P = .02) was associated with higher all-cause mortality, whereas heptadecanoic acid, 17:0, tended to be associated with lower all-cause mortality (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.79-1.00; P = .05). Arachidonic:linoleic acid ratio was associated with both cardiovascular (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05-1.31; P = .04) and all-cause (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.04-1.23; P = .005) mortality.

 

Fatigue is associated with excess mortality in the general population: results from the EPIC-Norfolk study.

Basu N, Yang X, Luben RN, Whibley D, Macfarlane GJ, Wareham NJ, Khaw KT, Myint PK.

BMC Med. 2016 Aug 20;14(1):122.

PMID: 27543008

https://bmcmedicine....2916-016-0662-y

hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality was 1.40 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.25-1.56) for those reporting the highest fatigue (bottom SF36-VT quartile) compared with those reporting the lowest fatigue (top SF36-VT quartile). This significant association was specifically observed for those deaths related to cardiovascular disease (HR 1.45, 95 % CI 1.18-1.78) but not cancer (HR 1.09, 95 % CI 0.90-1.32). Of the considered mechanisms, thyroid function was most notable for attenuating this association. The risk of all-cause mortality, however, remained significant even after considering all putative confounders and mechanisms (HR 1.26, 95 % CI 1.10-1.45).

[unadjusted mortality risk of high fatigue (HR 1.63, 95 % CI 1.40–.89) is similar to being a current smoker (HR 1.35, 95 % CI 1.24–1.48 ]

 

Regional aging and longevity characteristics in China.

Wang L, Li Y, Li H, Holdaway J, Hao Z, Wang W, Krafft T.

Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 Aug 12;67:153-159. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2016.08.002. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27544461

http://linkinghub.el...167494316301406

[Not a prospective study but the centenarian subjects have done something right compared to their younger compatriots who are unlikely to live so long.  Although health care systems and economic well-being are considered, healthy, lower calorie foods with less spices and fats and lots of vegetables and fruit play big in the paper.]

influence of economic development … regions with higher socio-economic development and that have a favorable climate. Centenarian distribution pattern is less influenced by economic but only for few regions. Lifestyle factors, such as sufficient sleep, positive mental state and a light diet

 

Dietary n-3 PUFA, fish consumption and depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

Grosso G, Micek A, Marventano S, Castellano S, Mistretta A, Pajak A, Galvano F.

J Affect Disord. 2016 Aug 16;205:269-281. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.08.011. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27544316

http://sci-hub.cc/10...jad.2016.08.011

[It seemed that fish and fish fats were more beneficial in Europe than Asia or USA and less beneficial in high quality studies.]

fish consumption and depression resulted in significant reduced risk (RR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.69, 0.89), with a linear dose-response … total n-3 PUFA and fish-derived n-3 PUFA [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)+docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] resulted in decreased risk for the highest compared with the lowest intake (RR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.92 and RR=0.82, 95% CI: 0.73, 0.92, respectively) and dose-response analysis revealed a J-shaped association with a peak decreased risk for 1.8g/d intake of n-3 PUFA (RR=0.30, 95% CI: 0.09, 0.98).

 

The impact of liquid preloads varying in macronutrient content on postprandial kinetics of amino acids relative to appetite in healthy adults.

Korompokis K, Östman E, Dougkas A.

Appetite. 2016 Aug 17. pii: S0195-6663(16)30415-9. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2016.08.099. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27544805

amino acid concentrations peaked at 90 min after all preloads and returned to the baseline values until 210 min. Protein intake affected amino acid profiles (P < 0.05), while no differences (P > 0.05) were detected between the two high protein preloads despite the different CHO:fat ratio (40%/0.4 CHO:fat and 40%/3.6 CHO:fat) … glutamate was positively associated with prospective consumption and inversely related to ghrelin (P < 0.05). Valine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine and α-aminobutyric acid were inversely associated with energy intake (P < 0.05).

[From the full-text, which is availed, I thought the most interesting results were:

“The impact of individual postprandial AA responses in combination with GLP-1, ghrelin, insulin and glucose on appetite sensations and appetite-related hormones was estimated. No significant associations of the total AA and gut hormones with the appetite sensations were found (P > 0.05), while there was a modest positive relationship of insulin with hunger (β = 0.009; P = 0.03) and an inverse relationship of glucose with desire to eat (β = −13.90; P = 0.04) and hunger (β = −15.51; P = 0.03) ( Table 7). The responses of the rest of AA were not related to appetite responses (data not shown). Only glutamate tended to have an effect on the desire to eat (β = 0.047; P = 0.06), but glucose had a greater inverse effect (β = −15.78; P = 0.015). Additionally, prospective consumption was positively influenced by glutamate (β = 0.012; P = 0.03). Regarding the influence of AA on energy intake, the total AA concentration as well as the majority of the concentration of individual AA did not relate to ad libitum energy intake. However, histidine (β = 0.01; P = 0.04) was positively related to energy intake, whereas valine (β = −0.01; P = 0.04), lysine (β = −0.01; P = 0.01), leucine (β = −0.01; P 0.02), isoleucine (β = −0.04; P = 0.03) and α-aminobutyric acid (β = −0.06; P = 0.03) had an inverse association with energy intake. As far as hormone responses are concerned, only glutamate had a significant inverse association with ghrelin (β = −0.65; P = 0.025), while GLP-1 and insulin were unaffected by the circulating AA (data not shown).”



#10 AlPater

AlPater
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Posted 26 August 2016 - 06:33 PM

Relations of Postload and Fasting Glucose With Incident Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality Late in Life: The Cardiovascular Health Study.

Brutsaert EF, Shitole S, Biggs ML, Mukamal KJ, deBoer IH, Thacker EL, Barzilay JI, Djoussé L, Ix JH, Smith NL, Kaplan RC, Siscovick DS, Psaty BM, Kizer JR.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Mar;71(3):370-7. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv106. Epub 2015 Aug 27.

PMID: 26314953

http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv106

follow-up of 11.2 years. In fully adjusted models, both fasting and 2-hour glucose were associated with ASCVD (HR per SD, 1.13 [1.03-1.25] and 1.17 [1.07-1.28], respectively) and all-cause mortality (HR 1.12 [1.07-1.18] and 1.14 [1.08-1.20]). After mutual adjustment, however, the associations for fasting glucose with both outcomes were abolished, but those for postload glucose were largely unchanged. Consistent findings were observed for ASCVD in competing-risks models … robust association of postload glucose with ASCVD and death late in life.

 

Body Mass Index and Mortality: A 10-Year Prospective Study in China.

Wang JB, Gu MJ, Shen P, Huang QC, Bao CZ, Ye ZH, Wang YQ, Mayila M, Ye D, Gu ST, Lin HB, Chen K.

Sci Rep. 2016 Aug 22;6:31609. doi: 10.1038/srep31609.

PMID: 27546611

http://ije.oxfordjou...t/41/2/472.long

http://ije.oxfordjou...2.full.pdf html

adjusted HRs for persons with BMIs of <15.0, 15.0-17.4, 17.5-19.9, and 20.0-22.4 were 1.61(95% CI: 1.17-2.23), 1.07(0.94-1.20), 1.04(0.98-1.10), 1.06(1.02-1.11)

 

Vitamin D Intake and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones.

Ferraro PM, Taylor EN, Gambaro G, Curhan GC.

J Urol. 2016 Aug 18. pii: S0022-5347(16)31070-9. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2016.08.084. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27545576

http://linkinghub.el...022534716310709

 in HPFS (HR for ≥1,000 vs <100 IU/day 1.08, 95% CI 0.80, 1.47, p-value for trend = 0.92) and NHS I (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.73, 1.35, p-value for trend = 0.70) … NHS II (HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.94, 1.48, p-value for trend = 0.02).

 

Evidence from randomised controlled trials does not support current dietary fat guidelines: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Harcombe Z, Baker JS, DiNicolantonio JJ, Grace F, Davies B.

Open Heart. 2016 Aug 8;3(2):e000409. doi: 10.1136/openhrt-2016-000409. eCollection 2016.

PMID: 27547428

http://openheart.bmj.../2/e000409.full

http://openheart.bmj...9.full.pdf html

 

Inflammatory and Glutamatergic Homeostasis Are Involved in Successful Aging.

Hascup ER, Wang F, Kopchick JJ, Bartke A.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Mar;71(3):281-9. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv010. Epub 2015 Feb 22.

PMID: 25711529

http://biomedgeronto...t/71/3/281.full

http://biomedgeronto...content/by/year

 

Serum thyroid function, mortality and disability in advanced old age: The Newcastle 85+ study.

Pearce SH, Razvi S, Yadegarfar ME, Martin-Ruiz C, Kingston A, Collerton J, Visser TJ, Kirkwood TB, Jagger C.

J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Aug 23:jc20161935. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27552542

http://press.endocri...10/jc.2016-1935

[I have seen other evidence that the very old having higher TSH live longer, but the disabilities data is something I do not recall having seen previously.]

After adjustment for age and sex, all cause mortality was associated with baseline serum rT3 and FT3 (both p<0.001), but not FT4 or TSH. After additional adjustment for potential confounders only rT3 remained significantly associated with mortality (p=0.001). Baseline serum TSH and rT3 predicted future disability trajectories in men and women, respectively.

 

Longitudinal associations between micronutrient consumption and leukocyte telomere length.

Lee JY, Shin C, Baik I.

J Hum Nutr Diet. 2016 Aug 22. doi: 10.1111/jhn.12403. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27550625

http://sci-hub.cc/do....1111/jhn.12403

leukocyte telomere length (LTL) … LTL was positively associated with the consumption of vitamin C (P < 0.05), folate (P = 0.05) and potassium (P = 0.05) in all participants. In the age-stratified analysis, the association between the consumption of vitamin C (P < 0.01), folate (P < 0.05) and potassium (P < 0.05) with LTL was significant only among participants aged <50 years.

 

Maternal creatine in pregnancy: a retrospective cohort study.

Dickinson H, Davies-Tuck M, Ellery SJ, Grieger JA, Wallace EM, Snow RJ, Walker DW, Clifton VL.

BJOG. 2016 Aug 23. doi: 10.1111/1471-0528.14237. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27550725

[The paper is pdf-availed and interested me since creatine relates to meat intake and the paper may suggest that it may improve pregnancy outcomes and seems to affect pregnant women depending on their lifestyle not related to meat intake.]

Maternal smoking, body mass index, asthma and socio-economic status were positively and parity negatively associated with maternal plasma and/or urine creatine. Maternal urine creatine concentration was positively associated with birthweight centile and birth length. After adjustment, each μmol/l increase in maternal urinary creatine was associated with a 1.23 (95% CI 0.44-2.02) unit increase in birthweight centile and a 0.11-cm (95% CI 0.03-0.2) increase in birth length.

 

[The next study examined cancer patients which I hope is not the case for anyone here, but it might be somewhat a parallel of what might happen for us if we believe we are going to benefit from nutrition, exercise, CR, etcetera.]

Is it best to expect the worst? Influence of patients' side-effect expectations on endocrine treatment outcome in a 2-year prospective clinical cohort study.

Nestoriuc Y, von Blanckenburg P, Schuricht F, Barsky AJ, Hadji P, Albert US, Rief W.

Ann Oncol. 2016 Aug 22. pii: mdw266. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27551051

http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/annonc/mdw266

After 2 years of endocrine treatment, patients reported high rates of side-effects (arthralgia: 71.3%, weight gain: 53.4%, hot flashes: 46.5%), including symptoms not directly attributable to the medication (breathing problems: 28.1%, dizziness: 25.6%). Pre-treatment expectations significantly predicted patient-reported long-term side-effects and quality of life … side-effects after 2 years of endocrine treatment was higher in patients with high negative expectations at baseline than in those with low negative expectations (RR = 1.833, CI 95%, 1.032-3.256).

 

Effect of Caffeine on Perceived Soreness and Functionality following an Endurance Cycling Event.

Caldwell AR, Tucker MA, Butts CL, McDermott BP, Vingren JL, Kunces LJ, Lee EC, Munoz CX, Williamson K, Armstrong LE, Ganio MS.

J Strength Cond Res. 2016 Aug 19. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27552210

[The below paper is pdf-availed.]

ratings of perceived muscle soreness (RPMS) and perceived lower extremity functionality (LEF) … 3 mg/kg body mass of caffeine or placebo … Afternoon ratings of LEF were greater with caffeine ingestion the 1 day post ride (65.0± 6.1 vs 72.3± 6.7 … p=0.04), but at no other time points (p>0.05). The caffeine group tended to have lower overall RPMS in the afternoon versus placebo (i.e., main effect of group; 1.1 ± 0.2 vs. 0.5 ± 0.2; p=0.09). Afternoon RPMS for the legs was significantly lower in the caffeine group (main effect of caffeine; 1.3 ± 0.2 vs 0.5 ± 0.3; p=0.05).

 

Association between dietary protein intake and risk of stroke: A meta-analysis of prospective studies.

Zhang XW, Yang Z, Li M, Li K, Deng YQ, Tang ZY.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Aug 6;223:548-551. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.08.106. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID: 27552579

http://sci-hub.cc/10...ard.2016.08.106

[Vegetable protein only protected from ischemic but not bleeding stroke.]

 

Body Fatness and Cancer--Viewpoint of the IARC Working Group.

Lauby-Secretan B, Scoccianti C, Loomis D, Grosse Y, Bianchini F, Straif K; International Agency for Research on Cancer Handbook Working Group.

N Engl J Med. 2016 Aug 25;375(8):794-8. doi: 10.1056/NEJMsr1606602. No abstract available.

PMID: 27557308

The International Agency for Research on Cancer convened a workshop on the relationship between body fatness and cancer, from which an IARC handbook on the topic will appear. An executive summary of the evidence is presented.

36.  Thompson HJ, Zhu Z, Jiang W.

Dietary energy restriction in breast  cancer  prevention. 

J  Mammary  Gland  Biol  Neoplasia 2003; 8: 133-42.

DOI: 10.1056/NEJMsr1606602

http://sci-hub.cc/10...-540-69297-3_11

 

The Role of Existential Beliefs Within the Relation of Centenarians' Health and Well-Being.

Araújo L, Ribeiro O, Paúl C.

J Relig Health. 2016 Aug 23. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27553459

[From the pdf-availed full-text: “significant and positive relationship with satisfaction with life (β = .227, p < .01), revealing that centenarians with higher score in ADL (more independent) feel more satisfied with their life. After controlling for existential beliefs, ADL was no longer associated with Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) (β = .130, p > .05)”]

existential resources are a crucial element for mitigating the impact of health constraints in subjective well-being in this population.

 

Having a Healthy Birth With a 100-Year-Old Liver.

Tolan K, Kayaalp C, Ispir M, Kirmizi S, Yilmaz S.

Prog Transplant. 2016 Aug 23. pii: 1526924816664088. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27555075

[Livers are remarkable organs.  The paper is not available.]

In March 2008, a 19-year-old woman required emergency liver transplantation due to acute-on-chronic liver failure. … liver belonged to a 93-year-old woman and contained a hydatid cyst. ... Five years after transplantation, the woman became pregnant and gave birth to a healthy female baby. Today, the ages of the baby, mother, and the transplanted liver are 1, 26, and 100 years, respectively. A nonagenarian liver with hydatid disease was able to sustain its viability in a younger woman after transplant and also helped her bring in a new life into the world.

 

Socioecological Risk Predictors of Physical Activity and Associated Mortality.

Loprinzi PD, Davis RE.

Am J Health Promot. 2016 Aug 23. pii: 0890117116662943. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27553059

Compared to those with 0 social risk factors, those with 1 and 2+ social risk factors engaged in 11% and 10% less MVPA, respectively. Those with 1 (vs 0) social risk factor had a 2.0-fold increase in mortality risk, and those with 2+ (vs 0) social risk factors had a 2.3-fold increase in mortality risk. Interaction effects for various socioecological factors on both MVPA and mortality were observable.

 

Obesity and Subtypes of Incident Cardiovascular Disease.

Ndumele CE, Matsushita K, Lazo M, Bello N, Blumenthal RS, Gerstenblith G, Nambi V, Ballantyne CM, Solomon SD, Selvin E, Folsom AR, Coresh J.

J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Jul 28;5(8). pii: e003921. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.116.003921.

PMID: 27468925

Free Article

http://jaha.ahajourn.../8/e003921.full

http://jaha.ahajourn...1.full.pdf html

higher body mass index [risk of heart failure] (hazard ratio 2.27, 95% CI 1.94-2.64).

 

Different Combinations of Glucose Tolerance and Blood Pressure Status and Incident Diabetes, Hypertension, and Chronic Kidney Disease.

Derakhshan A, Bagherzadeh-Khiabani F, Arshi B, Ramezankhani A, Azizi F, Hadaegh F.

J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Aug 20;5(8). pii: e003917. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.116.003917.

PMID: 27543801

Free Article

http://jaha.ahajourn.../8/e003917.full

http://jaha.ahajourn...7.full.pdf html

 T2DM, HTN, and CKD was 12.2, 29.8, and 24.8 per 1000 person-years. For incident T2DM, considering normal glucose tolerance/normal blood pressure as reference, prediabetes (PreDM)/HTN had the highest risk (hazard ratio: 7.22 [5.71-9.12]) while PreDM/normal blood pressure also showed a significant risk (5.58 [4.41-7.05]). Furthermore, risk of PreDM/HTN was higher than PreDM/normal blood pressure (P<0.05). For incident HTN, normal glucose tolerance/prehypertension was a strong predictor (3.28 [2.91-3.69]); however, addition of PreDM or T2DM did not increase the risk. For incident CKD, every category that included HTN and/or T2DM showed significant risk; this risk was marginally significant for the PreDM/HTN group (1.19 [0.98-1.43], P=0.06). In addition, PreDM/ normal blood pressure was a marginally significant risk factor for incident HTN while normal glucose tolerance/prehypertension was a significant predictor of T2DM.



#11 AlPater

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 08:11 PM

Ketogenic Diet and Cancer-a Perspective.

Smyl C.

Recent Results Cancer Res. 2016;207:233-40. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-42118-6_11.

PMID: 27557542

http://sci-hub.cc/10...-319-42118-6_11

[This diet may not be so good for handling cancer without syngery withanti-cancer drugs.]

 

Efficacy of Resveratrol Supplementation against Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials.

Zhang C, Yuan W, Fang J, Wang W, He P, Lei J, Wang C.

PLoS One. 2016 Aug 25;11(8):e0161792. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0161792. eCollection 2016.

PMID:  27560482

http://journals.plos...al.pone.0161792

http://journals.plos...one.0161792.PDF

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) ... Levels of low-density lipoprotein (MD = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.74, P < 0.05) and total cholesterol (MD = 0.49, 95% CI: 0.18, 0.80, P < 0.05) were higher in the resveratrol treatment groups than in placebo control groups, whereas other parameters were not altered.

 

Coffee and green tea consumption in relation to brain tumor risk in a Japanese population.

Ogawa T, Sawada N, Iwasaki M, Budhathoki S, Hidaka A, Yamaji T, Shimazu T, Sasazuki S, Narita Y, Tsugane S; Japan PUBLIC Health Center-Based Prospective Study Group.

Int J Cancer. 2016 Aug 25. doi: 10.1002/ijc.30405. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27560973

http://sci-hub.cc/10.1002/ijc.30405

No association was seen between green tea and brain tumor risk. In conclusion, our study suggested that coffee consumption might reduce the risk of brain tumor, including that of glioma, in the Japanese population.

 

Effect of Garlic and Lemon Juice Mixture on Lipid Profile and Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors in People 30-60 Years Old with Moderate Hyperlipidaemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Aslani N, Entezari MH, Askari G, Maghsoudi Z, Maracy MR.

Int J Prev Med. 2016 Jul 29;7:95. doi: 10.4103/2008-7802.187248. eCollection 2016.

PMID: 27563431

http://www.ijpvmjour...5;aulast=Aslani

[I think that subjects eating 20 g of garlic daily would know they ate it and would have placebo effects.  The results were remarkable, though.]

 (1) Received 20 g of garlic daily, plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice, (2) received 20 g garlic daily, (3) received 1 tablespoon of lemon juice daily, and (4) did not receive garlic or lemon juice. … 3 days of dietary records and 3 days of physical activity records during 8 weeks. Blood samples were obtained at study baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention … a significant decrease in total cholesterol (changes from baseline: 40.8 ± 6.1, P < 0.001), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (29.8 ± 2.6, P < 0.001), and fibrinogen (111.4 ± 16.1, P < 0.001) in the Group 1, in comparison with other groups. A greater reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed in Group 1 compared with the Groups 3 and 4 (37 ± 10, P = 0.01) (24 ± 1, P = 0.02); respectively. Furthermore, a great reduction in body mass index was observed in the mixed group compared with the lemon juice and control groups (1.6 ± 0.1, P = 0.04).

 

Re-evaluation of the mechanisms of dietary fibre and implications for macronutrient bioaccessibility, digestion and postprandial metabolism.

Grundy MM, Edwards CH, Mackie AR, Gidley MJ, Butterworth PJ, Ellis PR.

Br J Nutr. 2016 Sep;116(5):816-33. doi: 10.1017/S0007114516002610. Epub 2016 Jul 7.

PMID: 27385119

Free PMC Article

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4983777/

https://www.ncbi.nlm...4516002610a.pdf

[NSP refers to non-starch polysaccharide.]

wide variety of dietary fibre materials, comprising mainly of NSP that are not digested by enzymes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. … properties of fibre are affected during food processing … can impact on nutrient digestibility. … GI transit time and increased digesta viscosity, thereby affecting flow and mixing … cell wall encapsulation influences macronutrient digestibility … encapsulation of starch can limit the extent of gelatinisation during hydrothermal processing … diverse forms of fibre on rates and extents of starch and lipid digestion ...  potential of dietary fibre on health and well-being of humans.

 

Dietary intake of manganese and the risk of the metabolic syndrome in a Chinese population.

Zhou B, Su X, Su D, Zeng F, Wang MH, Huang L, Huang E, Zhu Y, Zhao D, He D, Zhu X, Yeoh E, Zhang R, Ding G.

Br J Nutr. 2016 Sep;116(5):853-63. doi: 10.1017/S0007114516002580. Epub 2016 Jul 7.

PMID:  27385039

Free PMC Article

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4983775/

https://www.ncbi.nlm...4516002580a.pdf

The mean intake of Mn was 6·07 (sd 2·94) mg/d for men (n 998) and 5·13 (sd 2·65) mg/d for women (n 1113). ... Higher Mn intake … MetS in men (Q4 v. Q1 OR 0·62; 95 % CI 0·42, 0·92; P trend=0·043) but an increased risk in women (Q4 v. Q1 OR 1·56; 95 % CI 1·02, 2·45; P trend=0·078). In addition, Mn intake was inversely associated with abdominal obesity (P trend=0·016) and hypertriacylglycerolaemia (P trend=0·029) in men, but positively associated with low HDL-cholesterol in both men (P trend=0·003) and women (P trend<0·001). Our results suggest that higher Mn intakes may be protective against the MetS in men.

 

Nutrition and mortality in the elderly over 10 years of follow-up: the Three-City study.

Letois F, Mura T, Scali J, Gutierrez LA, Féart C, Berr C.

Br J Nutr. 2016 Sep;116(5):882-9. doi: 10.1017/S000711451600266X. Epub 2016 Jul 25.

PMID: 27452277

http://sci-hub.cc/10...00711451600266X

Abstract

risk of death was significantly lower among subjects with the highest fruit and vegetable consumption (HR 0·90; 95 % CI 0·82, 0·99, P=0·03) and with regular fish consumption (HR 0·89; 95 % CI 0·81, 0·97, P=0·01). The benefit of olive oil use was found only in women (moderate olive oil use: HR 0·80; 95 % CI 0·68, 0·94, P=0·007; intensive use: HR 0·72; 95 % CI 0·60, 0·85, P=0·0002). Conversely, daily meat consumption increased the mortality risk (HR 1·12; 95 % CI, 1·01, 1·24, P=0·03). No association was found between risk of death and diet diversity and use of various fats.

 

The Impact of Interventions that Integrate Accelerometers on Physical Activity and Weight Loss: A Systematic Review.

Goode AP, Hall KS, Batch BC, Huffman KM, Hastings SN, Allen KD, Shaw RJ, Kanach FA, McDuffie JR, Kosinski AS, Williams JW Jr, Gierisch JM.

Ann Behav Med. 2016 Aug 26. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27565168

http://sci-hub.cc/10...2160-016-9829-1

standardized mean differences (SMDs) … increasing physical activity (SMD 0.26; 95 % CI 0.04 to 0.49; I 2 = 64.7 %). … small significant effect for weight loss ([mean difference] -1.65 kg; 95 % CI -3.03 to -0.28; I 2  = 81 %), and no moderators were significant.

 

Association between whole grain intake and all-cause mortality: a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

Ma X, Tang WG, Yang Y, Zhang QL, Zheng JL, Xiang YB.

Oncotarget. 2016 Aug 22. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.11491. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27566558

http://www.impactjou...91&path[]=36399

[Not surprisingly, the study found whole grain intake to associate with lower all-cause mortality, but the subgroup and sensitivity analysis in Table 1 dampen the enthusiasm I felt.]

 

 

Availability, affordability, and consumption of fruits and vegetables in 18 countries across income levels: findings from the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study.

Miller V, Yusuf S, Chow CK, Dehghan M, Corsi DJ, Lock K, Popkin B, Rangarajan S, Khatib R, Lear SA, Mony P, Kaur M, Mohan V, Vijayakumar K, Gupta R, Kruger A, Tsolekile L, Mohammadifard N, Rahman O, Rosengren A, Avezum A, Orlandini A, Ismail N, Lopez-Jaramillo P, Yusufali A, Karsidag K, Iqbal R, Chifamba J, Oakley SM, Ariffin F, Zatonska K, Poirier P, Wei L, Jian B, Hui C, Xu L, Xiulin B, Teo K, Mente A.

Lancet Glob Health. 2016 Aug 23. pii: S2214-109X(16)30186-3. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X(16)30186-3. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27567348

http://www.thelancet...ulltext?rss=yes

http://www.thelancet...(16)30186-3.pdf

[It is pretty predictable that poor people eat fewer fruit and vegetable servings, but I thought that the cost of two servings of fruits and three servings of vegetables varying from 51·97% to 1·85% of income was a remarkable factor for the poor to eat less fruit and vegetables.



#12 AlPater

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 08:14 PM

[Survival rates between patients in low (< 18.0 kg/m2) and intermediate (18-24.9 and 25-29.9 kg/m2) BMI categories were not significant.]

Metabolic Health Status and the Obesity Paradox in Older Adults.

Cheng FW, Gao X, Mitchell DC, Wood C, Rolston DD, Still CD, Jensen GL.

J Nutr Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 Jul-Sep;35(3):161-176.

PMID: 27559852

http://sci-hub.cc/10...97.2016.1199004

The "obesity paradox" may be partially explained by the inclusion of metabolically healthy overweight and obese older persons, who do not have elevated mortality risk, in population studies of BMI and mortality.



#13 AlPater

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 02:31 PM

[The below paper is not pdf-availed.]

An Oral Aβ Vaccine Using a Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vector in Aged Monkeys: Reduction in Plaque Amyloid and Increase in Aβ Oligomers.

Hara H, Ono F, Nakamura S, Matsumoto SE, Jin H, Hattori N, Tabira T.

J Alzheimers Dis. 2016 Aug 24. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27567868

amyloid-β (Aβ) … oral vaccine with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector carrying a signal sequence and Aβ1-43 cDNA (rAAV/Aβ) in old non-human primates, 12 African green and 10 cynomolgus monkeys. The enteric-dissolving coated capsules … significant reduction of the amyloid plaque burden and intracellular Aβ ... However, soluble Aβ and some Aβ oligomers were increased

 

[The below paper is not pdf-availed.  The brains seems to me to be remarkable organs.]

Perceptual learning leads to long lasting visual improvement in patients with central vision loss.

Maniglia M, Pavan A, Sato G, Contemori G, Montemurro S, Battaglini L, Casco C.

Restor Neurol Neurosci. 2016 Aug 11. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27567754

Macular Degeneration (MD) … peripheral retinal locus (PRL) … perceptual learning (PL) with lateral masking … PL with a lateral masking configuration has strong, non-invasive and long lasting rehabilitative potential to improve residual vision in the PRL of patients with central vision loss.

 

[I just thought that even if we do not know our genetic makeup, that if the effect applies to the possible significance of telomeres generally, then that too may apply only to women of a certain age.]

Telomerase Gene (hTERT) and Survival: Results From Two Swedish Cohorts of Older Adults.

Kalpouzos G, Rizzuto D, Keller L, Fastbom J, Santoni G, Angleman S, Graff C, Bäckman L, Fratiglioni L.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Feb;71(2):188-95. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glu222. Epub 2014 Nov 30.

PMID: 25452402

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4707686/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.../pdf/glu222.pdf

human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) ... In both cohorts, mortality was lower in female T/T carriers, aged 75+ years in KP (HR = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.5–0.9) and 78+ years in SNAC-K (HR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4–0.8) compared with female C/C carriers. T/T carriers died 1.8–3 years later than the C/C carriers. This effect was not present in men, neither in SNAC-K women aged 60–72 years.

 

Inflammation, Depression, and Slow Gait: A High Mortality Phenotype in Later Life.

Brown PJ, Roose SP, Zhang J, Wall M, Rutherford BR, Ayonayon HN, Butters MA, Harris T, Newman AB, Satterfield S, Simonsick EM, Yaffe K.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Feb;71(2):221-7. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv156. Epub 2015 Sep 20.

PMID: 26392405

http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv156

Trajectories of slow gait were associated with inflammation (r = .40, p < .001) and depression (r = .49, p < .001). Although worsening trajectories of inflammation were independently associated with mortality (p < .001), the association between worsening trajectories of slow gait and mortality was only present in participants with worsening depression trajectories (p < .01). Participants with increasing/consistently high trajectories of depression and consistently high trajectories of inflammation and slow gait (n = 247) have an adjusted-morality rate of 85.2%, greater than all other classification permutations.

 

[I have had vertigo/sea-sickness/motion sickness all my life.  Ouch.]

Association Between Vestibular and Cognitive Function in U.S. Adults: Data From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Semenov YR, Bigelow RT, Xue QL, du Lac S, Agrawal Y.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Feb;71(2):243-50. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv069. Epub 2015 Jul 28.

PMID: 26219850

http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glv069

Vestibular dysfunction was present in 58% of the study population. In multivariate analyses, vestibular dysfunction was associated with a 3.4-point lower DSS score (95% confidence interval: -5.2, -1.6; p < .0001), equivalent to the effect of 5 years of age. Vestibular dysfunction was also associated with a significantly higher odds of ADL difficulty (p = .001), and with a 2.6-fold increase in the odds of falling (p = .017). SEMs suggested that vestibular function mediates 14.3% of the effect of age on cognitive performance. Further SEMs suggested that lower cognitive performance mediates the association between vestibular loss and ADL difficulty as well as falls.


Edited by AlPater, 30 August 2016 - 02:34 PM.


#14 AlPater

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 08:21 PM

Health-related quality of life, rehabilitation and mortality in a nursing home population.

Hartog LC, Landman GW, Cimzar-Sweelssen M, Knipscheer A, Groenier KH, Kleefstra N, Bilo HJ, van Hateren KJ.

Neth J Med. 2016 Jul;74(6):247-56.

PMID: 27571722

http://www.njmonline...pdf.php?id=1734

Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) … vitality (HR 0.88 (95% CI 0.77-0.99)) and mental health (HR 0.86 (95% CI 0.75-0.98)) were inversely associated and role functioningphysical (HR 1.08 (95%CI 1.02-1.15)) was positively associated with mortality. The Harrell's C value and the R2 were ≤ 0.02 and ≤ 0.03 higher in the adjusted models with the dimensions role functioning- physical, mental health or vitality ... None … were related to successful rehabilitation.

 

Plasma trimethylamine-N-oxide following supplementation with vitamin D or D plus B-vitamins.

Obeid R, Awwad HM, Kirsch SH, Waldura C, Herrmann W, Graeber S, Geisel J.

Mol Nutr Food Res. 2016 Aug 28. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201600358. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27569255

http://sci-hub.cc/do.../mnfr.201600358

1200 IE vitamin D3 and 800 mg calcium and 25 received additionally 0.5 mg folic acid, 50 mg B6, and 0.5 mg B12 for 1 year ... TMAO declined in the vitamin D arm by 0.5 vs. 2.8 μmol/L in the D+B arm (P = 0.005). Hcy decreased and betaine increased in the D+B compared with the D arm. Within-subject levels of plasma choline and dimethylglycine and urine betaine increased in both arms and changes did not differ between the arms. TMAO reduction was predicted by higher baseline TMAO and lowering Hcy … variations of TMAO were greater in the D+B arm compared with vitamin D arm.

 

Exploring the association between low socioeconomic status and cardiovascular disease risk in healthy Greeks, in the years of financial crisis (2002-2012): The ATTICA study.

Kollia N, Panagiotakos DB, Georgousopoulou E, Chrysohoou C, Tousoulis D, Stefanadis C, Papageorgiou C, Pitsavos C.

Int J Cardiol. 2016 Aug 20;223:758-763. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.08.294. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27573601

http://linkinghub.el...167527316320137

Low compared to high SES class, at the ages above 45years, was independently associated with increased 10-year CVD incidence [adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval: 2.7 (1.5, 4.9)] but not among the younger participants. SES was also negatively associated with psychological components (all p-values<0.001), diabetes mellitus (p=0.002), obesity (p=0.087) and physical activity (p=0.056).



#15 AlPater

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 08:10 PM

[Interesting title to the news report but there may be something of a disconnect between it and the science.]
http://www.telegraph...ests-new-study/
Laziness is a sign of high intelligence, suggests new study
Helena Horton
http://www.telegraph...ests-new-study/
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
The physical sacrifice of thinking: Investigating the relationship between thinking and physical activity in everyday life.
McElroy T, Dickinson DL, Stroh N, Dickinson CA.
J Health Psychol. 2016 Aug;21(8):1750-7. doi: 10.1177/1359105314565827. Epub 2015 Jan 20.
PMID: 25609406
http://hpq.sagepub.c.../21/8/1750.long
http://hpq.sagepub.c...0.full.pdf html
low-need-for-cognition individuals were more physically active, but this difference was most pronounced during the 5-day work week and lessened during the weekend.

Inositol Hexakisphosphate Kinase 3 Regulates Metabolism and Lifespan in Mice.
Moritoh Y, Oka M, Yasuhara Y, Hozumi H, Iwachidow K, Fuse H, Tozawa R.
Sci Rep. 2016 Aug 31;6:32072. doi: 10.1038/srep32072.
PMID: 27577108
http://www.nature.co...icles/srep32072
[The enzyme seems to be important in things related to energy intake, including blood glucose levels and lifespan.]

Is poor oral health a risk marker for incident cardiovascular disease hospitalisation and all-cause mortality? Findings from 172 630 participants from the prospective 45 and Up Study.
Joshy G, Arora M, Korda RJ, Chalmers J, Banks E.
BMJ Open. 2016 Aug 30;6(8):e012386. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012386.
PMID: 27577588
[Yup, poor oral health bodes poorly with other aspects of health.]
http://bmjopen.bmj.c.../8/e012386.long

Relationship between plasma 25-hydroxymitamin D and leucocyte telomere length by sex and race in a US study.
Liu JJ, Cahoon EK, Linet MS, Little MP, Dagnall CL, Higson H, Savage SA, Freedman DM.
Br J Nutr. 2016 Sep;116(6):953-960. Epub 2016 Aug 12.
PMID: 27515444
[There was basically not evidence that vitamin D has anything to do with telomere length, which is thought by some to be an important factor in aging.  The paper is pdf-availed.  White males deficient in the vitamin had better telomere length.]

Resveratrol primes the effects of physical activity in old mice.
Rodríguez-Bies E, Tung BT, Navas P, López-Lluch G.
Br J Nutr. 2016 Sep;116(6):979-988. Epub 2016 Aug 4.
PMID:  27488121
http://sci-hub.cc/10...007114516002920
Resveratrol (RSV)… improves muscle performance in mature and old animals but not in young animals. Without showing significant effect by itself, RSV primed the effect of exercise by increasing endurance, coordination and strength in old animals.

https://www.whi.org/... 05Sept2014.pdf
Association between inflammatory potential of diet and risk of depression in middle-aged women: the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.
Shivappa N, Schoenaker DA, Hebert JR, Mishra GD.
Br J Nutr. 2016 Sep;116(6):1077-1086. Epub 2016 Aug 8.
PMID: 27498949
http://sci-hub.cc/10...007114516002853
dietary inflammatory index (DII) … Women with the most anti-inflammatory diet had an approximately 20 % lower risk of developing depression compared with women with the most pro-inflammatory diet (RRDII quartile 1 v. 4: 0·81; 95 % CI 0·69, 0·96; P trend=0·03).
========================================
Inflammatory dietary pattern and risk of depression among women.
Lucas M, Chocano-Bedoya P, Schulze MB, Mirzaei F, O'Reilly ÉJ, Okereke OI, Hu FB, Willett WC, Ascherio A.
Brain Behav Immun. 2014 Feb;36:46-53. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2013.09.014. Epub 2013 Oct 1. Erratum in: Brain Behav Immun. 2015 May;46:327. Shulze, Mathias B [corrected to Schulze, Matthias B].
PMID: 24095894
Free PMC Article
https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC3947176/
https://www.ncbi.nlm...nihms530243.pdf
relative risks comparing extreme quintiles of the inflammatory dietary pattern were 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22, 1.63; P-trend <.001) for the strict definition and 1.29 (95% CI, 1.18, 1.41; P-trend <.001) for the broader definition of depression.

[The two below papers have been well described in the Forum and the titles pretty much tell the story synopsis.]
https://www.crsociet...ugh/#entry18499
Alzheimer's disease: Attack on amyloid-β protein.
Reiman EM.
Nature. 2016 Aug 31;537(7618):36-7. doi: 10.1038/537036a. No abstract available.
PMID: 27582214
 http://sci-hub.cc/10.1038/537036a
An antibody therapy markedly reduces aggregates of amyloid-β, the hallmark protein of Alzheimer's disease, and might slow cognitive decline in patients. Confirmation of a cognitive benefit would be a game-changer. See Article p.50
=========================
The antibody aducanumab reduces Aβ plaques in Alzheimer's disease.
Sevigny J, Chiao P, Bussière T, Weinreb PH, Williams L, Maier M, Dunstan R, Salloway S, Chen T, Ling Y, O'Gorman J, Qian F, Arastu M, Li M, Chollate S, Brennan MS, Quintero-Monzon O, Scannevin RH, Arnold HM, Engber T, Rhodes K, Ferrero J, Hang Y, Mikulskis A, Grimm J, Hock C, Nitsch RM, Sandrock A.
Nature. 2016 Aug 31;537(7618):50-6. doi: 10.1038/nature19323.
PMID: 27582220
 http://sci-hub.cc/10.1038/nature19323

[The below paper impressed me with its pointing out to papers describing the benefits of exercise.]
Muscling In on Cancer.
Lucia A, Ramírez M.
N Engl J Med. 2016 Sep;375(9):892-4. doi: 10.1056/NEJMcibr1606456. No abstract available.
PMID: 27579642
http://sci-hub.cc/10...NEJMcibr1606456
1.   Elite athletes live longer than the general population: a meta-analysis.
Garatachea N, Santos-Lozano A, Sanchis-Gomar F, Fiuza-Luces C, Pareja-Galeano H, Emanuele E, Lucia A.
Mayo Clin Proc. 2014 Sep;89(9):1195-200. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2014.06.004. Epub 2014 Aug 12.
PMID: 25128074
http://sci-hub.cc/10...ocp.2014.06.004
 2.   Voluntary Running Suppresses Tumor Growth through Epinephrine- and IL-6-Dependent NK Cell Mobilization and Redistribution.
Pedersen L, Idorn M, Olofsson GH, Lauenborg B, Nookaew I, Hansen RH, Johannesen HH, Becker JC, Pedersen KS, Dethlefsen C, Nielsen J, Gehl J, Pedersen BK, Thor Straten P, Hojman P.
Cell Metab. 2016 Mar 8;23(3):554-62. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2016.01.011. Epub 2016 Feb 16.
PMID: 26895752
http://sci-hub.cc/10...met.2016.01.011

 

[Al - I summarized the above study (Pedersen et al) in this post back in March as follows:

 

The evidence [from Pedersen et al + other related studies] suggests that exercise coupled with cold exposure, or cold exposure alone, can reduce cancer growth and boost important aspects of immune system function (e.g. natural killer or NK cells) by increasing circulating levels of norepinephrine and interleukin-6.
 
--Dean]
 
 

[It surprised me that pancreatic β-cells's function improved with age.]

Searching for the β-Cell Fountain of Youth.
Jouvet N, Estall JL.
Endocrinology. 2016 Sep;157(9):3388-90. doi: 10.1210/en.2016-1561.
PMID: 27580804
http://press.endocri...=cr_pub=pubmed
Abstract
Aging affects every species and tissue but not in equal ways. Human pancreatic β-cells lose their ability to replicate, regenerate, and secrete insulin as one gets older. This natural process increases risk of developing diabetes as you age and is a concern for donor islets and stem cells obtained from older subjects destined for transplantation or emerging regenerative therapies. Using fluidic sorting and RNA sequencing on single cells, Xin et al describe a transcriptional signature of mouse β-cell aging between adulthood and a very old age. Amazingly, expression levels of more than 99% of genes do not change over time, despite the long lifespan of this specialized tissue. They identify a novel set of transcription factors that can explain decreases in cell survival and proliferation genes and potentially drive age-associated decline in regenerative capacity. Yet somehow, mouse β-cells maintain pathways regulating glucose metabolism and β-cell function despite experiencing challenges commonly associated with old age, including increased weight and fat mass. The authors conclude that β-cells of old mice are overall strikingly similar to young β-cells, implying that mechanisms may exist to resist aging and maintain their 'youth'. These new discoveries have interesting implications for efforts to preserve or improve function of human β-cells, providing potential clues toward prolonging the life and health of donor tissues or islets of people with diabetes.
Single-Cell RNAseq Reveals That Pancreatic β-Cells From Very Old Male Mice Have a Young Gene Signature.
Xin Y, Okamoto H, Kim J, Ni M, Adler C, Cavino K, Na E, Murphy AJ, Yancopoulos GD, Lin C, Gromada J.
Endocrinology. 2016 Sep;157(9):3431-8. doi: 10.1210/en.2016-1235. Epub 2016 Jul 28.
PMID: 27466694
http://sci-hub.cc/10...NEJMcibr1606456
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Aging and glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J male mice.
Leiter EH, Premdas F, Harrison DE, Lipson LG.
FASEB J. 1988 Sep;2(12):2807-11.
PMID: 3044905
Free Article
http://www.ncbi.nlm....d/?term=3044905
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Aging-Dependent Demethylation of Regulatory Elements Correlates with Chromatin State and Improved β Cell Function.
Avrahami D, Li C, Zhang J, Schug J, Avrahami R, Rao S, Stadler MB, Burger L, Schübeler D, Glaser B, Kaestner KH.
Cell Metab. 2015 Oct 6;22(4):619-32. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2015.07.025. Epub 2015 Aug 27.
PMID: 26321660
http://sci-hub.cc/10...met.2015.07.025


Edited by Dean Pomerleau, 04 September 2016 - 02:36 AM.
Added comment about Pedersen et al


#16 AlPater

AlPater
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Posted 04 September 2016 - 07:41 PM

Frailty and post-operative outcomes in older surgical patients: a systematic review.

Lin HS, Watts JN, Peel NM, Hubbard RE.

BMC Geriatr. 2016 Aug 31;16(1):157. doi: 10.1186/s12877-016-0329-8.

PMID: 27580947

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC5007853/

[It is best not to be frail when one has surgery.]

 

Screening for Skin Cancer in Adults: An Updated Systematic Evidence Review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force [Internet].

Wernli KJ, Henrikson NB, Morrison CC, Nguyen M, Pocobelli G, Whitlock EP.

Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); 2016 Jul.

PMID: 27583318

Free Books & Documents

https://www.ncbi.nlm...lth/PMH0089122/

[From the paper, my impression is that https://en.wikipedia...iser_Permanente would not like to pay for the screening.]

a clear statement cannot be made about the benefit of skin cancer screening

 

Renal function and attributable risk of death and cardiovascular hospitalization in patients with cardiovascular risk factors from a registry-based cohort: the Estudio Cardiovascular Valencia-risk study.

Tellez-Plaza M, Orozco-Beltran D, Gil-Guillen V, Pita-Fernandez S, Navarro-Pérez J, Pallares V, Valls F, Fernandez A, Perez-Navarro AM, Sanchis C, Dominguez-Lucas A, Martin-Moreno JM, Redon J; ESCARVAL STUDY GROUP.

J Hypertens. 2016 Aug 31. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27584973

[The below paper is pdf-availed.]

(12.8%) patients had eGFR below 60 ml/min per 1.73 m and among them 1782 (3.4%) had 45 ml/min per 1.73 m or lower. … population attributable risks associated with having a GFR lower than 60 ml/min per 1.73 m were 6.9% (95% confidence interval = 2.07, 10.65) for all-cause mortality, 6.8% (4.3, 9.4) for CHD hospitalization, and 4.1% (1.02, 7.00) for stroke hospitalization. Participants with increasing number of cardiovascular risk factors displayed increasing population attributable risks associated to a GFR less than 60 ml/min per 1.73 m for all-cause mortality and CHD (P heterogeneity 0.002 and 0.05, respectively).

 

[Yup, that would be me, relatively low birth weight and high-risk if I had obesity.]

Weight for gestational age and metabolically healthy obesity in adults from the Haguenau cohort.

Matta J, Carette C, Levy Marchal C, Bertrand J, Pétéra M, Zins M, Pujos-Guillot E, Comte B, Czernichow S.

BMJ Open. 2016 Aug 31;6(8):e011367. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011367.

PMID: 27580829

http://bmjopen.bmj.c.../8/e011367.long

'metabolically healthy obese' (MHO) … small weight for gestational age (SGA) and the risk of metabolically unhealthy obesity (MUHO).

The SGA-obese group had a higher risk of MUHO versus the AGA-obese group: RR=1.27 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.6) independently of age and sex.

 

True, true, unrelated? A review of recent evidence for a causal influence of breakfast on obesity.

Dhurandhar EJ.

Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2016 Oct;23(5):384-388.

PMID: 27584010

[The paper is pdf-availed.]

"skipping breakfast, compared to eating breakfast, does not have a causative, substantial, or lasting effect on energy balance and body weight in the context of free-living populations maintaining or losing weight. However, there is some evidence that eating breakfast may stabilize glycemic control and prevent insulin resistance compared with breakfast skipping."

"the effect of eggs on energy intake and satiety may be specific to overweight and obese adults"

"A 12-week RCT compared a high-fiber, low-fat breakfast with a control group that consumed their ‘usual’ breakfast, and found no effect of the high-fiber breakfast on body weight [ https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4344586/  ]”

 

Social support and ambulatory blood pressure in older people.

Sanchez-Martínez M, López-García E, Guallar-Castillón P, Cruz JJ, Orozco E, García-Esquinas E, Rodríguez-Artalejo F, Banegas JR.

J Hypertens. 2016 Oct;34(10):2045-2052.

PMID: 27584797

[The paper is pdf-availed.  Nighttime dipping was also significantly affected by some social support factors.]

Being married, cohabiting, and being accompanied when out of home were the support items significantly associated with SBP variables. After adjustment for sociodemographic (age, sex, education), behavioral (BMI, alcohol, tobacco, salt consumption, physical activity, Mediterranean diet score), and clinical variables [sleep quality, mental stress, comorbidity, BP medication, and ambulatory BP levels and heart rate (HR)], one additional point in the social support score built with the abovementioned three support variables, was associated with a decrease of 0.93 mmHg in night-time SBP (P = 0.039), totaling 2.8 mmHg decrease for a score of 3 vs. 0. The three-item social support score was also inversely associated with the night/day SBP ratio (β = -0.006, P = 0.010).

 

Plasma folate, vitamin B-6, and vitamin B-12 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutation carriers: a prospective study

Shana J Kim, Anna Zuchniak, Kyoung-Jin Sohn, Jan Lubinski, Rochelle Demsky, Andrea Eisen, Mohammad R Akbari, Young-In Kim, Steven A Narod, and Joanne Kotsopoulos

Am J Clin Nutr 2016; 104:671-677 doi:10.3945/ajcn.116.133470

PMID: 27465373

http://sci-hub.cc/10...ajcn.116.133470

[Low plasma folate(<24.4 ng/mL) (n= 123) High plasma folate(=/>24.4 ng/mL) (n= 41)]

Women with high plasma folate concentrations (>24.4 ng/mL) were associated with significantly increased breast cancer risk (HR: 3.20; 95% CI: 1.03, 9.92; P = 0.04, P-trend across quintiles = 0.07) compared with that of women with low plasma folate concentrations (≤24.4 ng/mL).

 

Higher concentrations of serum iron and transferrin saturation but not serum ferritin are associated with cancer outcomes

Anita CG Chua, Matthew W Knuiman, Debbie Trinder, Mark L Divitini, and John K Olynyk

Am J Clin Nutr 2016; 104:736-742 doi:10.3945/ajcn.115.129411

http://sci-hub.cc/10...ajcn.115.129411

PMID: 27488234

[They looked at tertile values.]

higher serum iron concentrations and transferrin saturation were associated with increased risks of incident nonskin cancer [HR for iron: 1.83 (95% CI: 1.21, 2.76; P < 0.01); HR for transferrin saturation: 1.68 (95% CI: 1.18, 2.38; P < 0.01)] including breast cancer [HR for iron: 2.45 (95% CI:1.12, 5.34; P < 0.05); HR for transferrin saturation: 1.90 (95% CI:1.02, 3.56; P < 0.05)] in women. Transferrin saturation was also associated with a greater risk of cancer death (HR: 2.48; 95% CI: 1.28, 4.82; P < 0.01). In men, higher iron concentrations were associated with reduced risks of incident nonskin cancer (HR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.99; P < 0.05) including colorectal cancer (HR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.95; P < 0.05).

 

Diets higher in animal and plant protein are associated with lower adiposity and do not impair kidney function in US adults.

Berryman CE, Agarwal S, Lieberman HR, Fulgoni VL 3rd, Pasiakos SM.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Sep;104(3):743-9. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.116.133819. Epub 2016 Jul 27.

PMID: 27465374

 http://sci-hub.cc/10...ajcn.116.133819

[The full-text gives details in addition to those in the abstract and leave me with the impression that plant proteins are healthier than animal and dairy proteins.]



#17 AlPater

AlPater
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Posted 05 September 2016 - 07:16 PM

Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

Navarrete-Muñoz EM, Wark PA, Romaguera D, Bhoo-Pathy N, Michaud D, Molina-Montes E, Tjønneland A, Olsen A, Overvad K, Boutron-Ruault MC, Clavel-Chapelon F, Fagherazzi G, Katzke VA, Kühn T, Steffen A, Trichopoulou A, Klinaki E, Papatesta EM, Masala G, Krogh V, Tumino R, Naccarati A, Mattiello A, Peeters PH, Rylander C, Parr CL, Skeie G, Weiderpass E, Quirós JR, Duell EJ, Dorronsoro M, Huerta JM, Ardanaz E, Wareham N, Khaw KT, Travis RC, Key T, Stepien M, Freisling H, Riboli E, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Sep;104(3):760-8. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.116.130963. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

PMID : 27510540

http://sci-hub.cc/10...ajcn.116.130963

Juice and nectar consumption was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk (HR per 100 g/d: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99)

 

http://www.telegraph...ests-new-study/

Laziness is a sign of high intelligence, suggests new study

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 

The physical sacrifice of thinking: Investigating the relationship between thinking and physical activity in everyday life.

McElroy T, Dickinson DL, Stroh N, Dickinson CA.

J Health Psychol. 2016 Aug;21(8):1750-7. doi: 10.1177/1359105314565827. Epub 2015 Jan 20.

PMID: 25609406

http://hpq.sagepub.c.../21/8/1750.long

http://hpq.sagepub.c...0.full.pdf html

low-need-for-cognition individuals were more physically active, but this difference was most pronounced during the 5-day work week and lessened during the weekend.

 

Patterns of Hospitalization Risk for Women Surviving Into Very Old Age: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

Dolja-Gore X, Harris ML, Kendig H, Byles JE.

Med Care. 2016 Aug 30. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27579907

[There is a lot of to me interesting data in the pdf-availed full-text.  Heart disease and widowhood were big risks.  Smoking seemed not to matter significantly while arthritis but not diabetes and COPD were hospitalization risks.]

the majority of women demonstrated relatively low hospital use over an extended period, even in the presence of chronic health conditions. High hospitalization risk was found to be concentrated among a small minority of these long-term survivors.

 

Inositol Hexakisphosphate Kinase 3 Regulates Metabolism and Lifespan in Mice.

Moritoh Y, Oka M, Yasuhara Y, Hozumi H, Iwachidow K, Fuse H, Tozawa R.

Sci Rep. 2016 Aug 31;6:32072. doi: 10.1038/srep32072.

PMID: 27577108

http://www.nature.co...icles/srep32072

We detected high levels of both mouse and human IP6K3 mRNA in myotubes and muscle tissues. In human myotubes, IP6K3 was upregulated by dexamethasone treatment, which is known to inhibit glucose metabolism. Furthermore, Ip6k3 expression was elevated under diabetic, fasting, and disuse conditions in mouse skeletal muscles. Ip6k3(-/-) mice demonstrated lower blood glucose, reduced circulating insulin, deceased fat mass, lower body weight, increased plasma lactate, enhanced glucose tolerance, lower glucose during an insulin tolerance test, and reduced muscle Pdk4 expression under normal diet conditions. Notably, Ip6k3 deletion extended animal lifespan

 

Is poor oral health a risk marker for incident cardiovascular disease hospitalisation and all-cause mortality? Findings from 172 630 participants from the prospective 45 and Up Study.

Joshy G, Arora M, Korda RJ, Chalmers J, Banks E.

BMJ Open. 2016 Aug 30;6(8):e012386. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012386.

PMID: 27577588

http://bmjopen.bmj.c.../8/e012386.long

[My thinking as people with poor oral health are less likely to chomp down on celery and raw salads.]

All-cause mortality and incident CVD hospitalisation risk increased significantly with increasing tooth loss for all outcomes except ischaemic stroke (ptrend<0.05). In those reporting no teeth versus ≥20 teeth left, risks were increased for HF (HR, 95% CI 1.97, 1.27 to 3.07), PVD (2.53, 1.81 to 3.52) and all-cause mortality (1.60, 1.37 to 1.87). The risk of IHD, PVD and all-cause mortality (but not HF or ischaemic stroke) increased significantly with worsening self-rated health of teeth and gums (ptrend<0.05). In those reporting poor versus very good health of teeth and gums, risks were increased for IHD (1.19, 1.03 to 1.38), PVD (1.66, 1.13 to 2.43) and all-cause mortality (1.76, 1.50 to 2.08).

 

Relationship between plasma 25-hydroxymitamin D and leucocyte telomere length by sex and race in a US study.

Liu JJ, Cahoon EK, Linet MS, Little MP, Dagnall CL, Higson H, Savage SA, Freedman DM.

Br J Nutr. 2016 Sep;116(6):953-960. Epub 2016 Aug 12.

PMID: 27515444

[Just as well, since I share with some the relevance of telomere length anyway, for the pdf-availed below paper.]

we found little evidence to support associations between 25(OH)D and long LTL

 

Resveratrol primes the effects of physical activity in old mice.

Rodríguez-Bies E, Tung BT, Navas P, López-Lluch G.

Br J Nutr. 2016 Sep;116(6):979-988. Epub 2016 Aug 4.

PMID: 27488121

http://sci-hub.cc/10...007114516002920

we have found that RSV improves muscle performance in mature and old animals but not in young animals. Without showing significant effect by itself, RSV primed the effect of exercise by increasing endurance, coordination and strength in old animals.

 

https://www.whi.org/... 05Sept2014.pdf

Association between inflammatory potential of diet and risk of depression in middle-aged women: the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

Shivappa N, Schoenaker DA, Hebert JR, Mishra GD.

Br J Nutr. 2016 Sep;116(6):1077-1086. Epub 2016 Aug 8.

PMID: 27498949

http://sci-hub.cc/10...007114516002853

[See http://sci-hub.cc/10...5/jn.115.228718 also.  I noted age was not but menopause status was related to depression.  It seemed to me that the index was not a big factor in depression.]

Women with the most anti-inflammatory diet had an approximately 20 % lower risk of developing depression compared with women with the most pro-inflammatory diet (RRDII quartile 1 v. 4: 0·81; 95 % CI 0·69, 0·96; P trend=0·03).

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 

Inflammatory dietary pattern and risk of depression among women.

Lucas M, Chocano-Bedoya P, Schulze MB, Mirzaei F, O'Reilly ÉJ, Okereke OI, Hu FB, Willett WC, Ascherio A.

Brain Behav Immun. 2014 Feb;36:46-53. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2013.09.014. Epub 2013 Oct 1. Erratum in: Brain Behav Immun. 2015 May;46:327. Shulze, Mathias B [corrected to Schulze, Matthias B].

PMID: 24095894

Free PMC Article

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC3947176/

https://www.ncbi.nlm...nihms530243.pdf

relative risks comparing extreme quintiles of the inflammatory dietary pattern were 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22, 1.63; P-trend <.001) for the strict definition and 1.29 (95% CI, 1.18, 1.41; P-trend <.001) for the broader definition of depression.

 

[The below papers have been discussed in https://www.crsociet...ugh/#entry18499 .]

Alzheimer's disease: Attack on amyloidprotein.

Reiman EM.

Nature. 2016 Aug 31;537(7618):36-7. doi: 10.1038/537036a. No abstract available.

PMID: 27582214

 http://sci-hub.cc/10.1038/537036a

An antibody therapy markedly reduces aggregates of amyloid-β, the hallmark protein of Alzheimer's disease, and might slow cognitive decline in patients. Confirmation of a cognitive benefit would be a game-changer. See Article p.50

=========================

The antibody aducanumab reduces Aβ plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

Sevigny J, Chiao P, Bussière T, Weinreb PH, Williams L, Maier M, Dunstan R, Salloway S, Chen T, Ling Y, O'Gorman J, Qian F, Arastu M, Li M, Chollate S, Brennan MS, Quintero-Monzon O, Scannevin RH, Arnold HM, Engber T, Rhodes K, Ferrero J, Hang Y, Mikulskis A, Grimm J, Hock C, Nitsch RM, Sandrock A.

Nature. 2016 Aug 31;537(7618):50-6. doi: 10.1038/nature19323.

PMID: 27582220

 http://sci-hub.cc/10.1038/nature19323

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, accompanied by synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Antibody-based immunotherapy against Aβ to trigger its clearance or mitigate its neurotoxicity has so far been unsuccessful. Here we report the generation of aducanumab, a human monoclonal antibody that selectively targets aggregated Aβ. In a transgenic mouse model of AD, aducanumab is shown to enter the brain, bind parenchymal Aβ, and reduce soluble and insoluble Aβ in a dose-dependent manner. In patients with prodromal or mild AD, one year of monthly intravenous infusions of aducanumab reduces brain Aβ in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is accompanied by a slowing of clinical decline measured by Clinical Dementia Rating—Sum of Boxes and Mini Mental State Examination scores. The main safety and tolerability findings are amyloid-related imaging abnormalities. These results justify further development of aducanumab for the treatment of AD. Should the slowing of clinical decline be confirmed in ongoing phase 3 clinical trials, it would provide compelling support for the amyloid hypothesis.



#18 AlPater

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 05:24 PM

Lancet Volume 388, Issue 10048, 3–9 September 2016, Pages 943–945

Cover image

Comment

Why do people not take life-saving medications? The case of statins

Salim Yusufa,

http://dx.doi.org.qe...6736(16)31532-X

... Studies without a randomised blinded comparator group cannot distinguish between symptoms that individuals naturally have versus those caused by the medication. Matthews and colleagues6 investigated the impact of this media coverage on use of statins in UK primary care. They found that …

The media usually prefer a good news story that sensationalises ... This is true for positive news (“breakthroughs”) and negative news (“scares”). … Journalists often base their stories on press releases issued by the authors' institutions or the journal in which the article is published, and they might not read the original article—placing responsibility on authors not to exaggerate their results, to appropriately reflect the weaknesses of their studies, and to avoid misrepresentations in their articles and press releases. Spin in press releases can exaggerate the importance of findings (eg, by extrapolating from surrogate outcomes to projected effect on clinical outcomes, or sometimes even from laboratory studies to effects in people) or minimise adverse effects. … Although lifestyle changes are preferred by many as initial steps for prevention of cardiovascular disease, the effect of simple advice during consultations to promote healthy lifestyles (other than a moderate effect on smoking cessation) is disappointing. ... The public health challenge is not overuse of statins, but their underuse even in high-risk populations …

SY is principal investigator of several trials of interventions in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease, including the recent HOPE-3 study which evaluated statins and blood pressure lowering, and was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and AstraZeneca.

http://www.telegraph...ests-new-study/

 

Mortality and Disease Prevalence among the Oldest Old.

Wesley D.

J Insur Med. 2015;45(1):6-8. doi: 10.17849/0743-6661-45.1.6.

PMID: 27584803

[The paper is not pdf-availed.]

Due to the "bathtub" relationship between incidence, recovery, death, and prevalence, the prevalence of such chronic conditions may actually drop at the oldest ages, even without medical improvements in prevention or treatment.

 

Association between maximum occlusal force and 3-year all-cause mortality in community-dwelling elderly people.

Iinuma T, Arai Y, Takayama M, Abe Y, Ito T, Kondo Y, Hirose N, Gionhaku N.

BMC Oral Health. 2016 Sep 1;16(1):82. doi: 10.1186/s12903-016-0283-z.

PMID: 27586200

https://bmcoralhealt...2903-016-0283-z

[It was interesting to me to compare the various factors for their risk of mortality in Table 3.]

... In model 2, we added handgrip strength as a confounder and found that the HR for [maximum occlusal force] was attenuated (HR = 0.73, 95 % CI = 0.54-0.99)

 

Effect of various doses of vitamin D supplementation on pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus: A randomized controlled trial.

Zhang Q, Cheng Y, He M, Li T, Ma Z, Cheng H.

Exp Ther Med. 2016 Sep;12(3):1889-1895. Epub 2016 Jul 13.

PMID: 27588106

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4998009/

… insulin, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance and total cholesterol were significantly reduced by high dosage vitamin D supplementation (P<0.05). … (50,000 IU every 2 weeks)

 

 

"we cannot exclude the possibility that other dietary compounds could be responsible for the performance changes"

Effects of a Short-Term High-Nitrate Diet on Exercise Performance.

Porcelli S, Pugliese L, Rejc E, Pavei G, Bonato M, Montorsi M, La Torre A, Rasica L, Marzorati M.

Nutrients. 2016 Aug 31;8(9). pii: E534.

PMID: 27589795

http://www.mdpi.com/...643/8/9/534/htm

… high (HND) or control (CD) nitrate diet (~8.2 mmol∙day-1 or ~2.9 mmol∙day-1, respectively). ... In HND (vs. CD) were observed: (a) a significant reduction of oxygen consumption during moderate-intensity constant work-rate cycling exercise (1.178 ± 0.141 vs. 1.269 ± 0.136 L·min-1); (b) a significantly higher total muscle work during fatiguing, intermittent sub-maximal isometric knee extension (357.3 ± 176.1 vs. 253.6 ± 149.0 Nm·s·kg-1); © an improved performance in Repeated Sprint Ability test.

 

http://www.the-scien...ing-a-Warning-/

fMRI Randomized Study of Mental and Motor Task Performance and Cortisol Levels to Potentiate Cortisol as a New Diagnostic Biomarker

Simon B N Thompson, Souhir Daly, Alain Le Blanche, Malek Abidi, Charma Belkhira and Giovanni de Marco

J Neurol Neu­rosci, 7:92, 2016

http://www.jneuro.co...ke.php?aid=9199

Yawning, fatigue, and cortisol: expanding the Thompson Cortisol Hypothesis.

Thompson SB.

Med Hypotheses. 2014 Oct;83(4):494-6. doi: 10.1016/j.mehy.2014.08.009. Epub 2014 Aug 15.

PMID: 25169036

Free Article

http://www.medical-h...0280-1/fulltext

Born to yawn? Understanding yawning as a warning of the rise in cortisol levels: randomized trial.

Thompson SB, Bishop P.

Interact J Med Res. 2012 Sep 20;1(2):e4. doi: 10.2196/ijmr.2241.

PMID: 23611879

Free PMC Article

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC3626133/

 

Neuropathology of supercentenarians - four autopsy case studies.

Takao M, Hirose N, Arai Y, Mihara B, Mimura M.

Acta Neuropathol Commun. 2016 Sep 2;4(1):97.

PMID: 27590044

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC5010697/

Neuropathological alterations associated with aging were mild to moderate in the supercentenarian brain

 

Fish intake during pregnancy or infancy and allergic outcomes in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Zhang GQ, Liu B, Li J, Luo CQ, Zhang Q, Chen JL, Sinha A, Li ZY.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2016 Sep 3. doi: 10.1111/pai.12648. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID: 27590571

Consumption of fish during the first year of life reduced the risk of eczema (RR 0.61; 95% CI 0.47, 0.80; P = 0.0003; I2 = 68%) and allergic rhinitis (RR 0.54; 95% CI 0.36, 0.81; P = 0.003; I2 = 74%).

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 

Is there a march from early food sensitization to later childhood allergic airway disease? Results from two prospective birth cohort studies.

Alduraywish SA, Standl M, Lodge CJ, Abramson MJ, Allen KJ, Erbas B, V Berg A, Heinrich J, Lowe AJ, Dharmage SC.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2016 Sep 3. doi: 10.1111/pai.12651. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27590890

sensitization to food only at 12 months in MACS and 24 months in LISAplus was associated with increased risk of current asthma (aOR=2.2; 95%CI 1.1, 4.6 in MACS and aOR=4.9; 2.4,10.1 in LISAplus). Similar results were seen for allergic rhinitis. Additionally, co-sensitization to food and aeroallergen in both cohorts at any tested point was a stronger predictor of asthma (at 24 months, aOR=8.3; 3.7, 18.8 in MACS and aOR=14.4; 5.0, 41.6 in LISAplus) and allergic rhinitis (at 24 months, aOR=3.9;1.9,8.1 in MACS and aOR=7.6;3.0,19.6 in LISAplus).



#19 AlPater

AlPater
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Posted 06 September 2016 - 08:11 PM

Associations of Premenopausal Hysterectomy and Oophorectomy With Breast Cancer Among Black and White Women: The Carolina Breast Cancer Study, 1993-2001.
Robinson WR, Nichols HB, Tse CK, Olshan AF, Troester MA.
Am J Epidemiol. 2016 Sep 1;184(5):388-99. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwv448. Epub 2016 Aug 23.
PMID: 27555487
http://sci-hub.cc/10.1093/aje/kwv448
Compared with no history of premenopausal surgery, bilateral oophorectomy and hysterectomy without oophorectomy were associated with lower odds of breast cancer (for bilateral oophorectomy, multivariable-adjusted odds ratios = 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.47, 0.77; for hysterectomy without oophorectomy, multivariable-adjusted odds ratios = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.55, 0.84). Estimates did not vary by race and were similar for hormone receptor-positive and hormone receptor-negative cancers. Use of estrogen-only menopausal hormone therapy did not attenuate the associations.
 
Nutritional Geometry
http://joshmitteldor...ional-geometry/
If you are looking for bottom-line advice, [he]’d say:
  • High-fluid, high fiber content are consistent recommendationsno tradeoffs, no qualifications. Leafy greens rule!
  • Low-protein when you’re young, higher protein when you’re old
  • Vegetable protein is preferable to meat or dairy
  • If you’re game to try something new, a high-fat ketogenic diet may offer advantages.
Physical Activity, Parental History of Premature Coronary Heart Disease, and Incident Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Florido R, Zhao D, Ndumele CE, Lutsey PL, McEvoy JW, Windham BG, Pankow JS, Guallar E, Michos ED.
J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Aug 30;5(9). pii: e003505. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.116.003505.
PMID: 27577582
http://jaha.ahajourn.../9/e003505.long
Free Article
[Physical activity benefit for reducing Incident Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease was not affected by Parental History of Premature Coronary Heart Disease.]
 
Participant-Reported Health Status Predicts Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality Independent of Established and Nontraditional Biomarkers: Evidence From a Representative US Sample.
Barger SD, Cribbet MR, Muldoon MF.
J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Aug 29;5(9). pii: e003741. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.116.003741.
PMID: 27572824
Free Article
http://jaha.ahajourn.../9/e003741.long
“Would you say your health in general is excellent, very good, good, fair or poor?”
a 1-SD decrease in self-rated health was associated with increased risk of CVD mortality (hazard ratio {HR}, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.51-2.45; P<0.001), and this hazard remained strong after adjusting for ASCVD risk and nontraditional biomarkers (HR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.42-2.26; P<0.001). Self-rated health also predicted all-cause mortality even after adjustment for ASCVD risk and nontraditional biomarkers (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.35-1.66; P<0.001).
 
Intranasal Insulin Improves Age-Related Cognitive Deficits and Reverses Electrophysiological Correlates of Brain Aging.
Maimaiti S, Anderson KL, DeMoll C, Brewer LD, Rauh BA, Gant JC, Blalock EM, Porter NM, Thibault O.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Jan;71(1):30-9. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glu314. Epub 2015 Feb 6.
PMID: 25659889
http://sci-hub.cc/10...3/gerona/glu314
Low-dose intranasal insulin improved memory recall in aged animals such that their performance was similar to that seen in younger animals.
 
Gait Speed Predicts Incident Disability: A Pooled Analysis.
Perera S, Patel KV, Rosano C, Rubin SM, Satterfield S, Harris T, Ensrud K, Orwoll E, Lee CG, Chandler JM, Newman AB, Cauley JA, Guralnik JM, Ferrucci L, Studenski SA.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Jan;71(1):63-71. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv126. Epub 2015 Aug 22.
PMID: 26297942
http://biomedgeronto...nt/71/1/63.long
The age-adjusted relative risk ratio per 0.1 m/s greater speed for bathing or dressing dependence in men was 0.68 (0.57-0.81) and in women: 0.74 (0.66-0.82); for mobility difficulty, men: 0.75 (0.68-0.82), women: 0.73 (0.67-0.80). Results were similar for combined disability and mortality. Effects were largely consistent across subgroups based on age, gender, race, body mass index, prior hospitalization, and selected chronic conditions. In the presence of multiple other risk factors for disability, gait speed significantly increased the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve.
 
The Effect of Pulse Pressure on All-Cause and Cardiovascular-Specific Mortality Risks in US Adults.
Borrell LN, Samuel L.
Ethn Dis. 2015 Spring;25(2):152-6.
PMID: 26118141
https://ethndis.org/...download/121/84
 “Q1: 15 to </=39, Q2: >39 to </=47, Q3: >47 to </=59, Q4: >59 to 175”
“Non-Hispanic Whites had
death rates of 1.34 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.77)
and 1.58 (95%CI: 1.18, 2.10) associated
with pulse pressures in Q3 and Q4 as
compared with their counterparts with
pulse pressure in Q1.”

Edited by AlPater, 22 August 2017 - 03:38 PM.


#20 AlPater

AlPater
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Posted 08 September 2016 - 08:47 PM

https://en.wikipedia...rotein#Function

Familial longevity study reveals a significant association of mitochondrial DNA copy number between centenarians and their offspring.

He YH, Chen XQ, Yan DJ, Xiao FH, Lin R, Liao XP, Liu YW, Pu SY, Yu Q, Sun HP, Jiang JJ, Cai WW, Kong QP.

Neurobiol Aging. 2016 Aug 6. pii: S0197-4580(16)30163-4. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2016.07.026. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27600867

http://sci-hub.cc/10...ing.2016.07.026

we found a positive association of mtDNA copy number in centenarians with that in F1 offspring (r = 0.54, p = 0.0008) but not with that in F1 spouses. … single-stranded DNA-binding protein 4 was significantly associated with mtDNA copy number and was highly expressed in centenarians as well as F1 offspring versus the F1 spouses, thus likely regulates the mtDNA copy number in the long-lived family members. … high mtDNA copy number is likely inheritable, which may act as a favorable factor to familial longevity through assuring adequate energy supply.

 

Meta-analysis on the risk of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular death in the early stage of hypertension.

Yue M, Zhang H, Li R.

Pak J Pharm Sci. 2016 Jul;29(4 Suppl):1343-51.

PMID: 27592484

The pdf is availed from the https://www.google.c...66NAsvNeILlsbgB site.

Compared with ideal blood pressure, the corrected risk factors, the pre-hypertension couldn't increase the RR of the all caused mortality; but it could increase remarkably the mortality of cardiovascular, coronary heart disease and stroke, and there was a significant difference between the two later (P<0.001).

 

Positive effects of resistant starch supplementation on bowel function in healthy adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Shen D, Bai H, Li Z, Yu Y, Zhang H, Chen L.

Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2016 Sep 4:1-9. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27593182

http://sci-hub.cc/10...86.2016.1226275

resistant starch significantly increased fecal wet weight (WMD 35.51 g/d, 95% CI 1.21, 69.82) and butyrate concentration (SMD 0.61, 95% CI 0.32, 0.89). Also, it significantly reduced fecal PH (WMD -0.19, 95% CI -0.35, -0.03), but the increment of defecation frequency were not statistically significant (WMD 0.04stools/g, 95% CI -0.08, 0.16).

 

Potential health hazards of eating red meat.

Wolk A.

J Intern Med. 2016 Sep 6. doi: 10.1111/joim.12543. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID: 27597529

Risk estimates from pooled analyses and meta-analyses are presented together with recently published findings. Based on at least six cohorts, summary results for the consumption of unprocessed red meat of 100 g day-1 varied from nonsignificant to statistically significantly increased risk (11% for stroke and for breast cancer, 15% for cardiovascular mortality, 17% for colorectal and 19% for advanced prostate cancer); for the consumption of 50 g day-1 processed meat, the risks were statistically significantly increased for most of the studied diseases (4% for total prostate cancer, 8% for cancer mortality, 9% for breast, 18% for colorectal and 19% for pancreatic cancer, 13% for stroke, 22% for total and 24% for cardiovascular mortality and 32% for diabetes). … some European countries have already integrated these two issues, human health and the 'health of the planet'

 

Associations of Bowel Movement Frequency with Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality among US Women.

Ma W, Li Y, Heianza Y, Staller KD, Chan AT, Rimm EB, Rexrode KM, Qi L.

Sci Rep. 2016 Sep 6;6:33005. doi: 10.1038/srep33005.

PMID: 27596972

as compared with women with daily bowel movement, having bowel movements more than once daily was significantly associated with increased risk of CVD (hazard ratio  : 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.21), total mortality (HR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.12-1.22), and cardiovascular mortality (HR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.07-1.28). With further adjustment for body mass index and diabetes status, the association with total mortality remained significant (HR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.06-1.15), whereas the associations with incident CVD and cardiovascular mortality were no longer significant.

 

Inhibition of the glycaemic response by onion: a comparison between lactose-tolerant and lactose-intolerant adults.

Hoffman R, Ranjbar G, Madden AM.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Mar 30. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2016.44. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 27026422

http://sci-hub.cc/10.1038/ejcn.2016.44

in lactose-tolerant people (44.2 versus 19.3%, P=0.04). Incremental area under the blood glucose curve was reduced more in lactose-intolerant people, but was not statistically significant (54.5 versus 42.1%, P=0.42). A diet containing quercetin glucosides may be of greater benefit for glycaemic control in lactose-intolerant people than in lactose-tolerant people.







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