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mccoy

Vitamin K2

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Yes, it is plausible that menaquinone is not a necessary vitamin but can be manufactured in the body from phylloquinone (vitamin K1).

 

K2 might sound a little like paleo hype, the fabled X-factor which is found only (almost) in animal derived food, blah blah blah...

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Re. raw milk: other studies found no significant menaquinone in unfermented milk products. Raw doesn't mean fermented. So menaquinone content in foods still exhibits some discrepancies.

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A recent article with novel analyses according to which menaquinone concentrations in cheese are far higher than those previously believed, especially in soft, full fat cheese. MK9 prevails but other forms, including MK10 to MK13 are well represented. If the data are accurate, then we'd have about 10 times as much K2 in cheese as outlined in previous studies. Comparable to concentrations in natto. But as we've seen in previous posts, data are very much erratic on the subject.

Multiple Vitamin K Forms Exist in Dairy Foods 

Current Developments in Nutrition, Volume 1, Issue 6, June 2017, e000638,https://doi.org/10.3945/cdn.117.000638
Published:
 
01 June 2017
 
Article history

 

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Edited by mccoy

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Mccoy, the study you referenced also found K2 content of the dairy products was proportional to the fat content.  Reduced fat versions of every type: milk, yogurts, soft cheeses, hard cheeses, etc. were reduced K2.

Some call it a paradox that among western nations the French eat higher fat and have a lower rate of heart disease.  Is it the red wine or is it just the cheese?

delice-de-bourgogne.jpg.1e56995704889a44754a946a9725ab12.jpg

When ripe and served warm the flavor is intensified and a little goes a long way which I think makes soft French cheeses CR compatible despite their richness.

Edited by Todd Allen

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Thanks Mccoy.  Interesting study.   A few years ago I  read a lot on Vitamin K2 and the data was pretty sparse on food vitamin K2 content.   I ended up deciding to supplement K2 ( along with vitamin D, which I  take to keep above 30 ng/ml.)
 

Quote

...the French eat higher fat and have a lower rate of heart disease.

Whether that's true or not, it's important not to single out any one disease endpoint;  all-cause mortality/healthspan/lifespan must be considered.

Edited by Sibiriak

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8 hours ago, Todd Allen said:

When ripe and served warm the flavor is intensified and a little goes a long way which I think makes soft French cheeses CR compatible despite their richness.

Todd, I'd tend to agree that even in small amounts good cheese is satisfying and satiating. I've been a huge cheese eater in the past. Now I've grown accustomed to other food and the fat gives me some nausea. But I always enjoy a few morsels of our special grass-fed mountain cheese.

 

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