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mikeccolella

Is phosphorous deadly?

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http://calorierestrictiondietplan.com/even-mildly-elevated-phosphorus-can-cause-artery-calcification/

 

Kidney patients have long suffered serious heart valve disease and atherosclrotic plaques due to high phosphorous levels. Dr. Rosen is suggesting that this is not limited to this extreme example and that in fact we should all be consciountious (sp) about this important nutrient. I do not ever recall much discussion on this. I checked my cron o meter phosphorous level and it was 240% of the RDA. Generally fruits and vegetables are low and meat, fish and dairy are higher, but there are many exceptions and of course processed foods can be very high in phosphorous. It should also be noted that bone and kidney health are compromised by high phosphorous diets and I can tell you getting phosphorous to near RDA Levels on a 95% vegan diet is not eay As I have recently attempted. Best I could do was get it down to 140% of the RDA.

 

So could phosphorous be one of the smoking guns and a confounder in all these nutrition studies on veganism vs meat eating etc? For instance vegans could be eating enormous amounts of this stuff or not depending on their specific choices.

 

High serum phosphorus concentrations in the general population

High serum phosphorus within the normal range (2.5-4.5 mg/dL) has recently been associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in individuals with normal kidney function. Two studies conducted in the general population and in individuals with prior CVD have linked high-normal serum phosphorus concentrations (≥3.5 mg/dL) to a greater cardiovascular risk (16, 17). Additional observational studies found that serum phosphorus concentrations equal to or above 4 mg/dL were associated with a doubling of the risk of developing incident CKD and end-stage renal disease in individuals free of renal disease at study inception (18). In a prospective cohort study, which followed 4,005 healthy young adults for more than 15 years, higher serum phosphorus within the normal range was also associated with left ventricular hypertrophy, a condition often linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes (19). In another study of 3,088 middle-aged healthy participants followed for over 17 years, serum phosphorus concentrations in the top quartile of the normal range were associated with a two-fold higher risk of heart failure compared to the lowest quartile (≥3.5 mg/dL vs. <2.9 mg/dL) (16). It is thought that vascular calcification, which may explain the relationship between high phosphorus and cardiovascular disease risk in CKD patients (see Hyperphosphatemia in subjects with kidney disease), contributes to this association in individuals with normal kidney function, even when their serum phosphorus is within the normal range and their intakes are below the tolerable upper intake level (UL) (20, 21). http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/minerals/phosphorus

Edited by mikeccolella

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All:
 

I do not ever recall much discussion on this. I checked my cron o meter phosphorous level and it was 240% of the RDA.

 
We've been discussing this intermittently for years: I wish we had access to the Archives, but I specifically saved eg. this from 2009 (I will leave the author anonymous, not knowing what hir wishes are on this subject):
 

[CR] Phosporus intake is an important overlooked concern
 
Al Pater (bless his heart!) posted some studies about phosphorus on 3/27 (below) which show that serum phosphorus levels in the upper part of the normal range are an important concern, relating to increased incidence of arterial calcification and other problems.  I think this is a very important health concern which I was previously completely unaware of, and I think this concern has been overlooked since I have seen no discussion of Al's post since he made it or of phosphorus.

I looked at my blood test results both recently and going back to 1984 and found that my phosphorus level was in the upper part of the normal range on most tests.  The tests which had lower phosphorus levels coincided with periods when I was eating a lower protein mostly vegetarian diet.

The main source of bioavailable phosphorus in the diet is animal protein sources, so those members who follow a low protein mostly vegetarian diet probably have no problem with their phosphorus intake or serum phosphorus levels.  Grains and legumes are also high in phosphorus, but only about one-third of the phosphorus is bioavailable because most is locked up in indigestible phytates.

The recommended daily intake of phosphorus is 1000 mg.  Looking at my dietary records, my own intake was well over 2000 mg on my recent diet.  One unexpected source of phosphorus in my diet was lecithin, which turns out to be very high in phosphorus due to having a lot of phosphatidyl choline!  (Brewers yeast is also somewhat high in phosphorus, although I don't take a lot of that.) My other main sources of phosphorus were salmon (my main source of animal protein) and yogurt.  Yogurt is particularly high in phosphorus, although this is somewhat mitigated because higher calcium intake partly (but not completely) offsets higher phosphorus intake.  Plus I eat a lot of legumes and some grains, which adds up quite a bit even though only one third of the phosphorus is bioavailable.

Whey protein and gelatin are two animal protein sources which are very low in phosphorus.  I decreased my intake of salmon and yogurt and subtituted whey protein to make sure I get enough complete protein.  I also substituted sweet potatoes, which are very low in phosphorus, for grains.  I mostly have eliminated lecithin.  The result is that my total intake of bioavailable phosphorus decreased by 50% to under 1000 mg.

I'm looking forward to seeing how my serum phosphorus responds to these changes on my next blood test.  Here is another important diet and blood test parameter we need to be aware of.

 

At 12:55 PM 3/27/09, Al Pater wrote: [i (MR) have edited this down somewhat and inserted my own comments].
 
[CRCOMMUNITY] Phosphate intake vs cardiovascular health?
 
How bad phosphate intake and the serum level of phosphate may be for our cardiovascular health may be indicated in the below (1) pdf-availed paper, which had as maybe the most convincing evidence the below (12) reference therein, a paper that is not in our archives and free full-text.


12.  Relations of serum phosphorus and calcium levels to the incidence of cardiovascular disease in the community.
Dhingra R, Sullivan LM, Fox CS, Wang TJ, D'Agostino RB Sr, Gaziano JM, Vasan RS.
Arch Intern Med. 2007 May 14;167(9):879-85.
PMID: 17502528 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free article at journal site

http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/167/9/879
http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/167/9/879/IOI70002T3

http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/167/9/879


1.  Is Lowering Phosphate Exposure The Key To Preventing Arterial Stiffening With Age?
Ferro CJ, Chue CD, Steeds RP, Townend JN.
Heart. 2009 Mar 24. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 19321494

Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Although atheroma is clearly important, the role of arteriosclerotic vascular disease is often overlooked. Arteriosclerosis causes increased arterial stiffness with consequent systolic hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. Serum phosphate is increasingly being recognised as a cardiovascular risk factor and has been implicated in the development of arteriosclerosis and arterial calcification. Its determinants are unclear, but both diet and minor reductions in renal function may be important. Diets in affluent populations are high in phosphate because of increased consumption of animal protein and the use of phosphate containing preservatives. We suggest that the consumption of a phosphate rich diet, exacerbated by the high prevalence of chronic kidney disease found in ageing populations, accelerates the development of arteriosclerosis. We hypothesise that reducing phosphate intake will attenuate the progression of arterial stiffness with major beneficial effects upon cardiovascular mortality and morbidity.

Keywords: arterial stiffness; arteriosclerosis; chronic kidney disease; diet; phosphate.

Arterial Stiffness
... [in addition to atherosclerosis], there is an additional form of arterial disease that contributes greatly to current high levels of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Arteriosclerosis is a disease of the arterial media, rather than the intima, that increases the stiffness of the arterial system and thus impairs one of the important functions of the aorta and conduit arteries, namely the conversion of pulsatile to continuous blood flow.[2] In health, the arterial system is highly distensible ensuring that most tissues receive near steady flow with no exposure to peak systolic pressures; this mechanism is so efficient that there is almost no drop in peripheral mean arterial pressure compared to ascending aortic pressure. The importance of this is most apparent when it is lost. Increased arterial stiffness results in higher ascending aortic systolic and pulse pressure as a result of loss of the "cushioning effect" of the aorta. ... These factors expose the cerebral micro- and macro-circulations to high-pressure fluctuations and increased cyclic stress leading to an increased risk of stroke, as well as causing left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and fibrosis predisposing to heart failure and arrhythmias. This principle also applies to other vascular beds including the renal circulation. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with cardiovascular mortality in patients with hypertension, diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) as well as previously healthy subjects.[5]
 
The increase in arterial stiffness that occurs with age in Western populations appears to be a result of prolonged exposure to environmental factors rather than an inevitable age-related effect. [This is not true; however, it's quite clear that a lot of lifestyle factors exacerbate the pure age effect, and I actually suspect that they are the more important ones in the poulation -MR]/ Many studies of populations in Africa and China living hunter-gatherer or subsistence-farming lifestyles have shown that in such communities blood pressure is low and systolic blood pressure does not rise with age. [These studies are too small, cross-sectional, and prone to survivor bias to draw that conclusion -MR] Systolic pressure only increases with advancing age when such populations migrate to urban areas and assume "Western" lifestyles.[6]

We suggest that an important mechanism for the development of arterial stiffness in societies that have become affluent is exposure of the vascular system to high levels of phosphate. This is caused by the consumption of a phosphate-rich diet and exacerbated by a high prevalence of CKD, which impairs phosphate excretion. Animal protein is rich in bioavailable phosphate and the use of phosphate-containing additives such as phosphoric acid (E338), used as an acidulate and preservative in many foods, including beer, cheese, jam and especially cola soft drinks, is widespread.[7] Although "primitive" diets based on grains and legumes often have a high phosphate content they provide little bio-available phosphate as most of this occurs in the form of non-absorbable phytates. Effectively these diets result in prolonged eating of low phosphate foods rather than the "binge-eating" of high phosphate foods associated with large increases in post-prandial serum phosphate levels, common in today's fast-food society. This mechanism in no way underestimates the contribution of a high sodium intake to the development of hypertension. Indeed by reducing arterial distensibility with age, phosphate exposure would exacerbate the effect of sodium loading. ...

Phosphate As A Cardiovascular Risk Factor In The General Population
Serum phosphate (at values within the normal reference range) has also been shown to be associated with cardiovascular mortality in the general population in two recent independent studies.[12, 13] In a prospective analysis of over 3000 Framingham Offspring study participants free of overt cardiovascular disease and with normal renal function, higher serum phosphate levels were associated with increased cardiovascular risk in a continuous graded relationship.[12] A similar association between higher levels of serum phosphate and the risk of death and cardiovascular events has also been demonstrated in survivors of myocardial infarction.[13]

Many cross sectional studies have reported an association between low bone mineral density and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the general population.[14] There is an inverse relationship between bone mineral content and vascular calcification and several longitudinal studies have shown that individuals with the greatest rate of bone loss demonstrate the fastest progression of vascular calcification.[14] In simple terms, it would appear that affected individuals, like patients with CKD, are characterised by a redistribution of calcium and phosphate from the skeleton into the vasculature with an associated increase in arterial stiffness.[15]

The determinants of serum phosphate concentration within apparently healthy populations are unclear but both diet and minor reductions in renal function may be important. In individuals with normal renal function, normal phosphate and calcium levels are maintained despite wide variation in dietary intake by modulation of vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH). ... Elevated serum phosphate, calcium and PTH and vitamin D deficiency are all associated with increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.[17] The mortality risk for phosphate appears greater than with these other parameters, however,[17] suggesting a primary role for phosphate in the development of this pathophysiology. This is supported by the observation that phosphate, even within the normal range, remains a cardiovascular risk factor in patients with normal renal function.[12, 13]

By What Mechanism Might Phosphate Cause Increased Arterial Stiffness?
The cell biology of increasing vascular stiffness and calcification is complex and there may be multiple influences of phosphate. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and osteoblasts derive from a common mesenchymal precursor cell and it appears that VSMCs retain their ability to mineralise. Core binding factor alpha-1 (cbfa1) is likely to be the switch that turns mesenchymal cells into osteoblasts and this protein is upregulated by exposure of VSMCs to phosphate.[15] In the media of calcified arteries, cbfa1 is highly expressed in association with osteopontin and collagen type 1, suggesting that cbfa1 may lead to de-differentiation of VSMCs to osteoblast-like cells.[15] Secondly, when VSMCs are exposed to phosphate a calcium-phosphate precipitate forms in association with the extracellular matrix. ... Thirdly, calcium and phosphate induce VSMC death and apoptotic body release (associated with inflammation and calcification), as well as matrix vesicle release from living cells.[18] Vesicles released by VSMCs after prolonged exposure to calcium and phosphate contain preformed calcium-phosphate-apatite and calcify intensively. Finally, increasing phosphate levels suppress vitamin D synthesis and increase PTH secretion.[10] Lower levels of vitamin D are powerfully associated with increased cardiovascular risk.[10] Hypovitaminosis D is also associated with increased arterial calcification,[19] decreased cardiac contractility,[20] dilated cardiomyopathy,[21] upregulation of the renin-angiotensin axis, hypertension and LVH.[21, 22, 23] PTH receptors are found on VSMCs and hyperparathyroidism is also strongly associated with hypertension,[24] increased arterial stiffness,[24] LVH, cardiac fibrosis,[25] impaired cardiac contractility[26] and impaired endothelial function.[27]

Lowering serum phosphate by either dietary or pharmacological means may well improve arterial stiffness by any one of the mechanisms mentioned, or by a combination of these, or indeed by other mechanisms not yet discovered.

 

 
I also have several posts on this subject saved from later in 2009, from 2012, and 2013.
 

I checked my cron o meter phosphorous level and it was 240% of the RDA.


Indeed: it's because many CR folks' dietary (and, when tested, serum) P is quite high that it has garnered so much discussion.

 

Generally fruits and vegetables are low and meat, fish and dairy are higher,

So could phosphorous be one of the smoking guns and a confounder in all these nutrition studies on veganism vs meat eating etc? For instance vegans could be eating enormous amounts of this stuff or not depending on their specific choices.


I wouldn't draw the conclusion you seem to be drawing. Pulses are very high in P, tho' the bioavailability of such is lower than from some other sources; seeds are quite high, and nuts grains also somewhat high tho' not as high as the above. I get >500 mg daily each from my various legume stew lunches (pulses and nuts), another 130ish mg each from MegaMuffins and Quorn Tenders, an average of that much from cheese (and a lot more on the specific days when I eat it) and >1000 mg from almost entirely vegetables. Ditching the cheese (and the milk in my breakfast) still leaves me with way more P than I need.

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Goldilocks: 

 

Heart attacks more likely in those with low blood phosphate levels

 

"Low phosphate in the blood is linked to the risk of heart attack and coronary artery disease, a new study in the journal PLOS One reports.

Researchers from the University of Surrey found that insufficient levels of phosphate in the blood may pose a particular danger to cardiovascular health, contradicting previous research in this area, which suggested low volumes of the mineral was beneficial to the heart." [emph. mine, TB]

 

That's why it's hard to get attached to any particular conclusion in medicine - what might be recommeded yesterday (keep your blood phosphates low), will be contradicted today, and what is recommeded today, will be overturned tomorrow.

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Goldilocks: 

 

Heart attacks more likely in those with low blood phosphate levels

 

"Low phosphate in the blood is linked to the risk of heart attack and coronary artery disease, a new study in the journal PLOS One reports.

 

Researchers from the University of Surrey found that insufficient levels of phosphate in the blood may pose a particular danger to cardiovascular health, contradicting previous research in this area, which suggested low volumes of the mineral was beneficial to the heart." [emph. mine, TB]

 

That's why it's hard to get attached to any particular conclusion in medicine - what might be recommeded yesterday (keep your blood phosphates low), will be contradicted today, and what is recommeded today, will be overturned tomorrow.

 

There's no contradiction or overturning here: your opening "Goldilocks" is exactly correct:

 

The researchers found that those with low levels (below 0.75 mmol/L) of the mineral in their blood were at a similar risk of developing coronary problems as those with elevated levels (above 1.5 mmol/L). Instances of both conditions were high amongst those with low and excessive levels of phosphate in the blood, however cardiac events in those with mid-range (1-1.25 mmol/L) levels were significantly less.

 

Or, as the paper's title puts it, thre is a "U-shaped relationship between serum phosphate and cardiovascular risk." In fact, "similar" is a bit of an overstatement: although the integrated odd ratios are similar, the curve for survival free of events was at least nominally much worse for people with high levels than for low:

 

The only "contradiction" is in the journalist's mind, apparently.

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Interestingly, I just had some urine and bloodwork tested yesterday.  My urine phosphorous is right in the middle of normal; it's been similar almost every time that I tested it.  I'll check serum phosphorous next.

 

  --  Saul

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Hmmm...

 

The last time serum phosphorus was tested was about a year ago.  It was in the middle of the normal range -- previous tests have been similar; with one excedption, when it was high.

 

IMO, the only wat to know if you're out of line (or in line) for some nutrient, is blood and urine work.  (Dietary intake only hints at that.)

 

  --  Saul

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I started this post a year ago almost to the day. I had been diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis as a result of childhood rheumatic fever ( twice) and the subsequent time effect. The valve lasted 60 years and my surgeon was impressed. IAC, I had the valve replaced in February with open heart surgery. I am back to normal life and appreciating it!!!

 

Phosphorous is one of the components often mentioned in aortic stenosis which becomes relatively common in old age unrelated to rheumatic fever. Also smoking, chlesterol, diabetes and possibly vitamin k2

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This news story caught my eye recently:

 

For pitta's sake: EU kebab meat move could make doner a goner

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/dec/01/for-pittas-sake-eu-parliament-threatens-to-make-doner-kebab-a-goner

 

[...]A move by the European parliament to ban the phosphates necessary to keep seasoned kebab meat moist and flavoursome, even after the most arduous periods on a spit, is said to pose a direct threat to the future of the high street delicacy.

 

An estimated 1.3m doner kebabs are sold every day in the UK from more than 20,000 outlets. The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, was even guest of honour last year at the British kebab awards. Across the whole of Europe, some 200,000 people work in the industry.

 

In Germany, where the doner kebab is by far and away the most popular fast food, consternation at the development has prompted some apocalyptic visions.

 

“If the European parliament gets its way, this would be the death sentence for the entire doner kebab industry in the European Union,” said Kenan Koyuncu of the German association of doner kebab producers.

 

[...]A scientific review in 2012 suggested a possible link between phosphates, when used as food additives, and heart disease, although the evidence remains inconclusive.

 

EU rules normally prohibit the use of phosphate additives in meat preparation, where they are used to protect flavour and retain water, but there are exceptions, and the law is currently silent on their use in frozen kebab meat.

 

The European parliament’s health committee this week voted down a proposal from the European commission that would have allowed the use of phosphoric acid, phosphates and polyphosphates in kebab meat made of mutton, lamb, veal, beef or poultry.

 

The illustrious Dr. Greger addresses the topic of phosphate additives here:

Phosphate Additives in Meat Purge & Cola

https://nutritionfacts.org/video/phosphate-additives-in-meat-purge-and-cola/

 

Soy, almond, and rice milk etc. often contain calcium phosphate, magnesium phosphate, or tri-calcium phosphate.   I'm not sure though if the amounts are large enough to be of any concern.

 

See also:

Phosphate Additives in Food—a Health Risk

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3278747/

 

Why phosphate additives will be the next taboo ingredient

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/wellness/why-phosphate-additives-will-be-the-next-taboo-ingredient/2017/03/29/7dd3247a-02cf-11e7-b1e9-a05d3c21f7cf_story.html?utm_term=.c64188eca4ef

Edited by Sibiriak

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Thank you Sibirak! Intersting links with lots of relevant information. Again we see reason to avoid corporate food industries frankenfoods. Stick to the foods with no tampering or minimal tampering.

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Excess phosphorus causes heart tissue calcification and here we see a connection with cancer. Processed foods tend to be high, but quite a few healthier options are high in phosphorus. My Cronometer levels for phosphorus are generally in the 200-250% rda range and that is with me making a fairly determined effort to keep them low.

 

Have you checked your phosphorous levels lately??

 

Al Pater recently posted:

 

Phosphate toxicity and tumorigenesis.

Brown RB, Razzaque MS.

Biochim Biophys Acta. 2018 Apr 20. pii: S0304-419X(18)30042-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bbcan.2018.04.007. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID: 29684520

Abstract

In this brief opinion article, we briefly summarized evidence that cellular phosphate burden from phosphate toxicity is a pathophysiological determinant of cancer cell growth. Tumor cells express more phosphate cotransporters and store more inorganic phosphate than normal cells, and dysregulated phosphate homeostasis is associated with the genesis of various human tumors. High dietary phosphate consumption causes the growth of lung and skin tumors in experimental animal models. Experimental studies show that excessive phosphate burden induces growth-promoting cell signaling, stimulates neovascularization, and is associated with chromosome instability and metastasis. Studies have also shown phosphate is a mitogenic factor that affects various tumor cell growth. Among epidemiological evidence linking phosphorus and tumor formation, the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study found that high dietary phosphorus levels were independently associated with lethal and high-grade prostate cancer. Further research is needed to determine how excessive dietary phosphate consumption influences initiation and promotion of tumorigenesis, and to elucidate prognostic benefits of reducing phosphate burden to decrease tumor cell growth and delay metastatic progression. The results of such studies could provide the basis for therapeutic modulation of phosphate metabolism for the improved patient outcome.

KEYWORDS:

Diet; FGF23; Klotho; Phosphate toxicity; Tumorigenesis

Edited by mikeccolella

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mikeccolella:  Processed foods tend to be high, but quite a few healthier options are high in phosphorus. My Cronometer levels for phosphorus are generally in the 200-250% rda range...

 

 

I'm curious: what items in your diet are most responsible for pushing up the phosphorous total?

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An earlier study by the same authors,  Brown RB  &  Razzaque MS, with full text:

 

Dysregulation of phosphate metabolism and conditions associated with phosphate toxicity

https://www.nature.com/bonekeyreports/2015/150603/bonekey201574/full/bonekey201574.html

 

 

Cf. Dietary phosphorus intake and health

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/99/2/247/4571459

Edited by Sibiriak

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As you can see it is primarily vegan, whole food. No particular items are pushing up the phosphorus. Its just something that is all over the place; however I am thinking that a typical diet probably contains 400% or so Rda so this particular one is a bit above 200% even though cron o meter incorrectly shows it at 143%

 

https://cronometer.com/printfood.html?name=Lowphosphorous&food=3358818

Edited by mikeccolella

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mikeccolella:  Processed foods tend to be high, but quite a few healthier options are high in phosphorus. My Cronometer levels for phosphorus are generally in the 200-250% rda range...

 

 

I'm curious: what items in your diet are most responsible for pushing up the phosphorous total?

 

 

I got curious as well. My daily average phosporous intake for last week is 1821 mg = 260% RDA.

 

Main contributors:

  1. Almonds 29%
  2. Cacao powder 24 %
  3. Mushrooms 18%
  4. Soymilk 18%
  5. walnuts 16%
  6. Cashews 15%
  7. Tahini 12%
  8. Chia seeds 12%
  9. Pumpernickel bread 10%
  10. Fresh oranges 9%

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Again, before freaking out about how much phosphorus there's in any given food, check to see how bioavailable it is, as mentioned above in one of the posts. So Mccoy mentioned almonds, which I consume quite a bit of, but I am not as worried, because it appears bound up with phytate, so not quite as bioavailable as f.ex. salmon (which I also consume 1-2 times a week). Apparently you get about 50% of the phosphorus in almonds as bioavailable.

 

https://nuts.com/healthy-eating/phosphorus

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mikeccolella:  Processed foods tend to be high, but quite a few healthier options are high in phosphorus. My Cronometer levels for phosphorus are generally in the 200-250% rda range...

 

 

I'm curious: what items in your diet are most responsible for pushing up the phosphorous total?

 

 

I get a ton from sundry pulses and nuts — and 77 mg on an average day from Ambronite, which I only eat once a week except in multi-day stretches when traveling.

 

 

Again, before freaking out about how much phosphorus there's in any given food, check to see how bioavailable it is, as mentioned above in one of the posts. So Mccoy mentioned almonds, which I consume quite a bit of, but I am not as worried, because it appears bound up with phytate, so not quite as bioavailable as f.ex. salmon (which I also consume 1-2 times a week). Apparently you get about 50% of the phosphorus in almonds as bioavailable.

 

https://nuts.com/healthy-eating/phosphorus

 

Don't believe the anti-hype ;) . I, and a lot of other CR folks, have persistently high serum P despite ostensibly healthy kidneys and negligible additive-derived P.

 

 

Hoka hey! Today is a good day to fight! Today is a good day to die!

 

Yeah ... only an insane beast of burden (equine) would believe there's a good day for either. Days when — for situational reasons — it's necessary or noble, sure.

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@Michael R      You are fighting Death.   One day your opponent will win.   In the end, you will have lived, and fought and died--like every other human being.   That is the "situation".

 

Edited by Sibiriak

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@Michael R      You are fighting Death.   One day your opponent will win.   In the end, you will have lived, and fought and died--like every other human being.   That is the "situation".

Of course. That doesn't mean there's a good day for it to happen.

 

I'll concede there are plenty of good days to "fight" in non-physical ways, such as the fight against death waged in the laboratory, the gym, the E/R, or electronic medical libraries. CH was talking about shooting people.

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A list of foods I picked to compare phosphorus levels per 100 calories based on Cron o meter. Keep in mind that the RDA for phosphorus is 700 mg so for example 1 cup of broccoli gives you 27% of your days needs. Dean’s dietary emphasis on fruit may have one more benefit.

 

 

Cranberries 23

Papaya 23

Banana 24

Orange 29

Avocodo 32

Strawberry 37

Pecans 40

Walnuts 52

Peanut butter 54

Raspberries 55

Sweet potato 66

Almonds 83

Carrot 85

Collards 97

Peas 98

Chickpeas 98

Oats 108

Turnips 118

Flax seed 120

Chicken breast 125

Tomato 133

Milk whole 137

Rutabaga 137

Green cabbage 143

Napa 158

Broc 191

Bok choy 241

Green squash 246

Edited by mikeccolella

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Guest Guest

I eleminated brewyers yeast from my diet. Its a very high source of phosprous.

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Interesting. The brewer's yeast I used to take - Lewis Labs - it's shown as zero:

 

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/custom/1323569/2

 

And now I take the Solgar brand, and phosphorus isn't shown at all, implying that there is zero of it in this brand also.

 

http://www.solgar.com/SolgarProducts/Brewers-Yeast-Powder.htm

 

I'm not doubting that your brewer's yeast has the phosphorus you say, but maybe it depends on the brand?

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