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Hello healthy people, I am new here and I would like to inquire about more sources of the healthy fats for muscle body building. Here is the thing, recently I have been working out and going to the gym and I am following a healthy diet schedules and I eat everything healthy even carbs and fats. Furthermore, I am aware that Avocados, Nuts and Olive oil are the most common sources of healthy fats and I am currently using them.

 

Is there any other sources of fats that will be helpful for body building ??

 

Kind regards,

- Gustavo Woltmann 

 

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Hello healthy people, I am new here and I would like to inquire about more sources of the healthy fats for muscle body building. Here is the thing, recently I have been working out and going to the gym and I am following a healthy diet schedules and I eat everything healthy even carbs and fats. Furthermore, I am aware that Avocados, Nuts and Olive oil are the most common sources of healthy fats and I am currently using them.

 

Is there any other sources of fats that will be helpful for body building ??

 

Kind regards,

- Gustavo Woltmann 

 

Gustavo, it would depend if you are following a vegan diet or not.

Vegan-wise, you cited the most healthy ones, to which I would add, as per this forum suggestions, ground flaxseed, which provide a large amount of omega3s in the form of ALA.

 

If you are not vegan, fat in organic dairy products from pastured cattle is pretty good. And fish oil is a source of omega3s favourite of bodybuilders.

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I suppose the other way to look at this is what are unhealthy fats?

 

Consensus seems to be that trans fats are the worst.  Also bad are polyunsaturated fats damaged by oxidation or excessive heat which can create trans fat among other issues.  Many common vegetable oils such as soybean oil are supposedly stripped of most beneficial aspects in the refining process and have a lot of omega 6 which may boost the need for omega 3 and being high in polyunsaturates are a poor choice for high temp cooking.

 

Saturated fats are thought by many to be awful but there is controversy and the evidence is mixed.  Some believe coconut oil is very healthy and others believe lard is a health food.

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I eat avocados, large variety of nuts, especially walnuts, high phenol extra virgin olive oil, ground flax seed, sunflower seeds, chia seed on a daily basis.  I'm not quite sure what this has to do with bodybuilding though.  What is your goal?  I avoid spiking my growth factors, and eat a low protein plant based whole food diet.

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I don't know that there are specific fats that are "good for" bodybuilding - there are just fats that are more and less healthy, period. Generally speaking trans fats and saturated fats are to be avoided. You can live without them. There are fats that you cannot live without - essential fatty acids - so you must make sure you get enough of those. Unfortunately, there is no firm consensus as to what are the best forms, sources and proportions. 

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I eat avocados, large variety of nuts, especially walnuts, high phenol extra virgin olive oil, ground flax seed, sunflower seeds, chia seed on a daily basis.  I'm not quite sure what this has to do with bodybuilding though.  What is your goal?  I avoid spiking my growth factors, and eat a low protein plant based whole food diet.

Good advice and variety of sources.. !! Thanks a lot..

 

However, working out requires eating fully healthy to respond to your body by eating Proteins, healthy carbs, healthy fats, vitamins/minerals/fibers and in order to supply body with healthy fats I have to find good sources.

 

- Gustavo Woltmann

 

I don't know that there are specific fats that are "good for" bodybuilding - there are just fats that are more and less healthy, period. Generally speaking trans fats and saturated fats are to be avoided. You can live without them. There are fats that you cannot live without - essential fatty acids - so you must make sure you get enough of those. Unfortunately, there is no firm consensus as to what are the best forms, sources and proportions. 

I am aware of that and try to stay away from Unhealthy fats. 

 

However, working out requires eating fully healthy to respond to your body by eating Proteins, healthy carbs, healthy fats, vitamins/minerals/fibers and in order to supply body with healthy fats I have to find good sources.

 

- Gustavo Woltmann

 

 

 

Hello healthy people, I am new here and I would like to inquire about more sources of the healthy fats for muscle body building. Here is the thing, recently I have been working out and going to the gym and I am following a healthy diet schedules and I eat everything healthy even carbs and fats. Furthermore, I am aware that Avocados, Nuts and Olive oil are the most common sources of healthy fats and I am currently using them.

 

Is there any other sources of fats that will be helpful for body building ??

 

Kind regards,

- Gustavo Woltmann 

 

Gustavo, it would depend if you are following a vegan diet or not.

Vegan-wise, you cited the most healthy ones, to which I would add, as per this forum suggestions, ground flaxseed, which provide a large amount of omega3s in the form of ALA.

 

If you are not vegan, fat in organic dairy products from pastured cattle is pretty good. And fish oil is a source of omega3s favourite of bodybuilders.

 

Thanks a lot.

- Gustavo Woltmann

 

 

I suppose the other way to look at this is what are unhealthy fats?

 

Consensus seems to be that trans fats are the worst.  Also bad are polyunsaturated fats damaged by oxidation or excessive heat which can create trans fat among other issues.  Many common vegetable oils such as soybean oil are supposedly stripped of most beneficial aspects in the refining process and have a lot of omega 6 which may boost the need for omega 3 and being high in polyunsaturates are a poor choice for high temp cooking.

 

Saturated fats are thought by many to be awful but there is controversy and the evidence is mixed.  Some believe coconut oil is very healthy and others believe lard is a health food.

Thanks for the useful information :) !!! I really appreciate it. I would definitely try soybean oil.

 

- Gustavo Woltmann 

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Thanks for the useful information :) !!! I really appreciate it. I would definitely try soybean oil.

 

Gustavo, I think you misunderstood my comments as I was describing what I understand to be reasons to minimize soybean oil consumption.   Perhaps it is different in Germany, but here in the US soybean oil is found in the ingredient list of many commercially prepared/manufactured food products because it is cheap and many people probably eat more of it than they should.

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Thanks for the useful information :) !!! I really appreciate it. I would definitely try soybean oil.

 

Gustavo, I think you misunderstood my comments as I was describing what I understand to be reasons to minimize soybean oil consumption.   Perhaps it is different in Germany, but here in the US soybean oil is found in the ingredient list of many commercially prepared/manufactured food products because it is cheap and many people probably eat more of it than they should.

 

Well I believe that saturated fats are very healthy for the body but in the normal amounts not too much !! However, I wrote it wrongly I meant the Coconut oil not soybean :).. Sorry my bad.

 

Kind regards,

Gustavo Woltmann 

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Fatty acids in cardiovascular health and disease: a comprehensive update.

Baum SJ, Kris-Etherton PM, Willett WC, Lichtenstein AH, Rudel LL, Maki KC, Whelan J, Ramsden CE, Block RC.

J Clin Lipidol. 2012 May-Jun;6(3):216-34. doi: 10.1016/j.jacl.2012.04.077. Review.

PMID: 22658146

Abstract

Research dating back to the 1950s reported an association between the consumption of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and risk of coronary heart disease. Recent epidemiological evidence, however, challenges these findings. It is well accepted that the consumption of SFAs increases low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), whereas carbohydrates, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) do not. High-density lipoprotein (HDL)-C increases with SFA intake. Among individuals who are insulin resistant, a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet typically has an adverse effect on lipid profiles (in addition to decreasing HDL-C, it also increases triglyceride and LDL particle concentrations). Consequently, a moderate fat diet in which unsaturated fatty acids replace SFAs and carbohydrates are not augmented is advised to lower LDL-C; compared with a low-fat diet, a moderate-fat diet will lower triglycerides and increase HDL-C. Now, there is some new evidence that is questioning the health benefits of even MUFAs and PUFAs. In addition, in a few recent studies investigators have also failed to demonstrate expected cardiovascular benefits of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids. To clarify the clinical pros and cons of dietary fats, the National Lipid Association held a fatty acid symposium at the 2011 National Lipid Association Scientific Sessions. During these sessions, the science regarding the effects of different fatty acid classes on coronary heart disease risk was reviewed.

"Conclusion

The National Lipid Association 2011 Fatty Acid Summit

included presentations that summarized current controversies

in fatty acid science relative to CVD risk. Food is

extraordinarily complex; thus, it is unlikely that randomized

controlled trials assessing dietary interventions will be able

to determine definitively the effects of altering intakes of

various fatty acids on CVD risk. To make dietary recommendations,

we will have to rely on epidemiologic evidence

coupled with controlled clinical trials on surrogate markers,

along with an evolving understanding of the pathophysiology

of CVD. Messages conveyed at the summit were that

SFAs have unfavorable effects on LDL-C and are probably

equivalent to refined and high glycemic index carbohydrates

with respect to CVD risk (based on epidemiological studies).

Furthermore, the presentations underscored that, when

evaluating diet studies one must carefully consider which

foods and nutrients are substituted for those that are

displaced. With regard to MUFA, specifically oleic acid—

one element of a Mediterranean diet, substantial evidence

was presented for favorable effects on CVD risk markers

and a suggestion of benefit from some observational

studies. However, a MUFA-rich diet has also been shown

to increase the percentage of cholesteryl oleate in cholesterol

esters, which has been found to correlate with

increased arterial intima-media thickness, greater mortality

in observational studies, and with coronary artery atherosclerosis

in intervention studies conducted in mice and

non-human primates. More information on the relationship

between oleic acid intake and CVD risk is needed.

Although cardioprotective effects of n-6 PUFA, specifically

LA, have been promoted based, in part, on results from

several clinical trials, a detailed evaluation of the dietary

interventions provided in those studies suggested possible

confounding in some by inclusion of significant amounts of

ALA, EPA, and DHA. Thus, it was concluded that LA is

essential and may be beneficial for cardiovascular health,

although there are limitations in the available literature.

Finally, with respect to n-3 fatty acids and CVD risk, the

message conveyed at this summit was a reaffirmation of

current recommendations regarding consumption of EPA

and DHA for CVD prevention, and particularly for secondary

prevention."

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Gustavo, and anyone else: see my mega-post on EVOO health benefits. As I said in a related thread, EVOO has more robustly-demostrated health benefits than any other single food on the planet, by a wide margin — let alone any other single source of fat.

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As far as I know mono-unsaturated-fat is the best fat-source for energy. About 2/3rd of the fat in Avocados is Mono-Unsaturated.

 

Omega3 is also good but more in terms of a micronutrient as in: "it's best used as a building-block in cell-walls and not for obtaining energy".

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Avocados,cheese,dark chocolate,yogurt,fatty fish,egg white,nuts,virgin olive oil,cocunut.They are rich in fat and healthy.

 

It's the egg yolks that have high fat content, not the whites.  (I won't comment on the relative healthiness of the various fats in your list).

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Hi,

            Avocados,cheese,dark chocolate,yogurt,fatty fish,egg white,nuts,virgin olive oil,cocunut.They are rich in fat and healthy.

Chocolate, full-fat cheese, and coconuts are all full of saturated fat, which is not healthy, despite the marketing campaigns put on by people selling chocolate (and cacao nibs, etc) and virgin coconut oil.

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Your right, thanks Michael. It's good to know their background.

 

I suggest we don't dismiss the information because of credentials (he was a chiropractor).  

 

Pompa reviews supplements and health products he thinks will help his clients.

 

What do you think about the PureForm Omega supplement?

 

Regards,

 

Ken

Edited by KenB

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Assuming that you're talking about the supplement sold at pureformomega dot com:

 

First, it's silly to package up a supplement that itself contains the 'ideal' ratio of omega-3 to -6, no matter what you think the 'ideal' ratio may be. Your diet will contain a different ratio, and by near-mathematical certainty,  just adding more EFAs in the 'ideal ratio'— will not turn an unbalanced ratio to that same balance. Rather, if you're taking a supplement at all (rather than adjusting your diet, as you should), you want a supplement that it itself unbalanced, in a way that complements what's missing in your dietary intake.

 

Second, by name and by content, this is based on the Brian Peskin nonsense. See here, here, and here.

 

And they seem to suggest that a nitrogen bubble in a supplement is itself a protection against oxygen, which is of course just nonsense: nitrogen won't oxidize the fats, but it isn't an oxygen 'sponge' of some sort.

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