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mccoy

Coratina EVOO

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I came across this article by professor Maurizio Servili, a researcher on EVOO. What amazed me in thin excerpt is the cited  very high average values and extremely high max values of TPC (total polyphenols concentration) in Coratina cultivar EVOOs. I'll try and obtain more info.

Referring more strictly to the health parameters, it should be noted that in terms of oleic acid the average value is 75% of the total acid composition with peaks reaching 78% and therefore widely considered as extra-virgin oil with a high content of oleic acid, the value in tocopherols (vitamin E) is high in the average data of 290 mg / kg with maximum values that reach 450 mg / kg but the strength of the product is represented by the phenolic composition which in this case is widely at the maximum for an extra virgin olive oil. It should be remembered that in the face of a variability of the bioactive phenolic compounds in extra virgin olive oils ranging from 40 mg / kg to more than 1500 mg / kg, the Coratina cultivar oils have an average value of 1027 mg / kg and a range of variability ranging from 630 mg / kg to 1500 mg / kg. These values make it possible to state how this oil represents, within the Italian varietal heritage, a point of excellence for the parameters related to the health-oil relationship.

 

Edited by mccoy

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So far I could not find any EVOOs which meet  such elevated standards. Only a couplpe of the EVOOs advertised published their TPC which was 500-600 ppms, pretty good but not ultra high.

Also, some producers sell their EVOOs at obscene prices. The coratina oil was traditionally regarded as almost poison in Italy, in consideration of its very pungent and bitterish taste. They used to almost hurl it at you .

Edited by mccoy

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Hey Mccoy, am I correct in thinking you are living in Italy?

I've looked at a number of Coratina olive oils online over the past year, and most I have seen have been between 500-800 mg/kg phenols. You should be able to find some for rather cheap i'd imagine...easily €5 to €10/L if you do some digging. just an example at 672ppm https://www.oilala.com/en/product/extra-virgin-olive-oil-monovariety-from-the-coratina-olive-5-litersextra-virgin-olive-oil-monovariety-from-the-coratina-olive-5-liters/
Of course, I am sure that there are higher phenol oils out there, and if you inquire with enough producers, you can probably find something in the 900-1000 range, but personally I think going for the cheapest (yet still high phenol) option makes more sense, and then just consuming that much more olive oil.

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Hi Tea, yes I'm in Italy and the Oilalà oil is the only Coratina producer I could find online with good TPs, good prices and published lab analyses. I'm waiting for the new crop results. The drawback is that not many that I know have their oil analyses  published. The highest value that I know, which has also been discussed in this forum is the Di Carlo-Torre Di Mossa EVOO from Bitritto, about 900 ppm TP, but that was a value not published by the producer, rather by Amphora nueva in America. And it is a very expensive product compared to prices in Italy. I'm starting to talk to people and see if I can find some local producer in Puglia. Oilalà remains my main prospect so far.

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Surprisingly, the majority (I would say, 80%) of olive oil producers I have inquired with seem able to provide me with a polyphenol content for their product. It's crazy that they don't just make this information available on their websites, but most don't realize the marketing potential for it I guess, even in cases where they have really impressive numbers.

Some other products that might be relevant to your search:
https://www.artimondo.it/olio-extravergine-d-oliva-pugliese-monovarietale-oliva-coratina-lt-5.html

http://www.bottegaitria.it/en/olive-oil/508-extra-virgin-olive-oil-coratina-upal-5l-1718.html?search_query=coratina&results=6

https://www.casaprencipe.it/negozio/olio-extravergine/coratina-5-litri-detail.html

https://www.amazon.it/LATTINA-LITRI-EXTRAVERGINE-CULTIVAR-CORATINA/dp/B01IXXRPZ8/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1536046524&sr=8-2&keywords=coratina+5+litri

There are also a few ebay sellers located in Italy that have very reasonable Coratina prices, worth giving a look.
 

none of those links above list phenol content, but if you inquire within, I would bet most could give you a number.  I too am awaiting the new harvest to stock up, but unfortunately i'll have to pay the hefty shipping premium to get delivery to the US.

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Thanks very much tea, I'm going to enquire as soon as the new crop is available, it's usually October or November in Puglia, depending on the microclimate (near the cost, on the low highlands and so on). If you need any info that I may be able to collect locally pls do not hesitate to ask. I live in an oil-producing region but that's not  Puglia though, that's a different reality with huge farms of Olive trees, sometimes to the horizon, specific cropping and farming techniques and probably different processing methods. From the following image it seems that Coratina is mostly farmed in the Andria, Barletta and Trani areas, a relaltively small area compared to the large territory of Puglia. I can drive there in 2-3 hours, but references are needed.

PastedGraphic-1.png

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSlU3GTWL1S41eFKC034RN

Edited by mccoy

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On 8/24/2018 at 4:48 AM, mccoy said:

I came across this article by professor Maurizio Servili, a researcher on EVOO. What amazed me in thin excerpt is the cited  very high average values and extremely high max values of TPC (total polyphenols concentration) in Coratina cultivar EVOOs. I'll try and obtain more info.

... It should be remembered that in the face of a variability of the bioactive phenolic compounds in extra virgin olive oils ranging from 40 mg / kg to more than 1500 mg / kg, the Coratina cultivar oils have an average value of 1027 mg / kg and a range of variability ranging from 630 mg / kg to 1500 mg / kg.

First: McCoy, would you please link the source for the Servili article? I couldn't find it via Google; is it maybe actually in Italian, with the above being your translation?

In any case: I suspect that the reason for the discrepancy you're seeing is that in 2017, the IOC adopted a new HPLC method for the measurement of 'biophenols;' as I've pointed out a couple of times, HPLC- (or NMR-) based methods give numbers that are on their face several times higher than you get from the colorimetric Folin–Ciocalteu reagent, which has been used in the vast majority of health and nutrition research on EVOO (as opposed to the analytical chemistry literature). HPLC- (or NMR-) based methods are certainly more accurate than colorimetric methods, but unfortunately there is no way to simply convert from one to the other (I have seen oils with data on both, and it really varies pretty wildly — it really is like apples and oranges), which is very annoying in the near term as it makes nearly all the existing nutrition research hard to 'translate.'

VF/Amphora have historically reported F-C data and have been responsible in reporting uniformly using caffeic-equivalents, which minimized a similar but much less severe problem even within colorimetric methods; they have for the last while been gathering data using both methods, but putting F-C numbers on their website to avoid unintentionally misleading customers — though I expect they will eventually convert over to the IOC HPLC method.

Because of the EU health claim requirements and the publication of an official IOC methodology, EU producers are now increasingly measuring phenolics and are doing so using the IOC method. Servilli is presumably quoting such numbers, as is the producer in tea's first post (I don't see numbers for the oils in your other posts, tea — were they just made to give McCoy people to call and inquire)?

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7 hours ago, Michael R said:

First: McCoy, would you please link the source for the Servili article? I couldn't find it via Google; is it maybe actually in Italian, with the above being your translation?

Exactly, the article is not a scientific paper, written in Italian and this is the link, he makes no reference to analytical methods.

This year Oilalà is selling its Coratina EVOO with an advertised amount of about 700 ppms TP.

I asked for the certificate but they didn't send it to me yet. I'm  reluctant to buy without having seen the original lab report.

 

 

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Oilalà sent me the lab report but it's relative to last year's crop, apparently the complete analyses are provided on january. TP as Tyrosol is 744 ppms and they expect it to be even higher this year, I don't know how they know that. Most probably the method is the colorimetric one cited by Michael, altough to be sure we should look at the relevant regulations cited in the certificate.

Acidity is very low and the price is reasonable, although pretty high relative to local producers (12 euro per liter).

I'm going to order 10 or 20 liters.

 

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