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fruit and fructose


mccoy
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At last I could find some official confirmation (if there ever was any need) that fructose in fruit is not detrimental. This comes from the Peter attia Podcast, Dr. Lustig himself speaking.

https://peterattiamd.com/roblustig/

 

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Only half (or less) the fructose that you would eat in a piece of fruit, for example, might actually get to the liver

  • The area under the curve will be wider, which means the insulin response will be lower, which is what you want, because it took longer, but a lot of it won’t get absorbed
  • It will be digested: it doesn’t come out in the stool, it gets digested by the gut bacteria who use it for their own purposes’

This is part of a wider excerpt on food fiber:

 

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  • Example: let’s start yeah let’s talk about fiber
    • 160 kcals from almonds
    • You absorb about 130 kcals
    • What happened to the 30?
    • The soluble and insoluble fiber in the almonds forms a gel on the inside of the intestine
    • You can actually see it on electron microscopy a whitish gel that’s going to act as a secondary barrier preventing absorption of some of those almond calories early on
    • If they don’t get absorbed in the duodenum, where they go next?
    • Jejunum: what’s in the jejunum that’s not in the duodenum? The microbiome
    • The duodenum is essentially sterile: it’s got a pH of 1 — only H. pylori can live there
    • The lining is formed in the duodenum to prevent your liver from getting the whole dose, because anything that’s absorbed in the duodenum goes straight to the liver’
  • ‘Only half (or less) the fructose that you would eat in a piece of fruit, for example, might actually get to the liver
    • The area under the curve will be wider, which means the insulin response will be lower, which is what you want, because it took longer, but a lot of it won’t get absorbed
    • It will be digested: it doesn’t come out in the stool, it gets digested by the gut bacteria who use it for their own purposes’
  • ‘Here’s the thing that I only learned about a month and a half ago which is absolutely essential
    • If you don’t consume fiber, that means that your gut bacteria are not getting the food they need
    • Because you’re absorbing it all early, but your bacteria still have to survive: so what do they do?
    • They proteolyze and lipolyze the mucin layer
    • They autodigest the mucin layer that sits on the surface of your intestinal epithelial cells, protecting them
    • You can actually see on electron microscopy an increased apposition of the bacteria with the intestinal epithelial cell, which likely causes damage, possibly a leaky gut, and possibly GI diseases like colitis, and even maybe Crohn’s’

‘The idea is to feed your bacteria or your bacteria will digest you’

 

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You can actually see on electron microscopy an increased apposition of the bacteria with the intestinal epithelial cell, which likely causes damage, possibly a leaky gut, and possibly GI diseases like colitis, and even maybe Crohn’s’      ‘The idea is to feed your bacteria or your bacteria will digest you

 

Nevertheless,  various forms of  fasting may be good for the gut microbiome.

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5 minutes ago, Sibiriak said:

 

Nevertheless,  various forms of  fasting may be good for the gut microbiome.

Perfectly agreed, would be interesting to know what happens to avoid ingestion of intestine lining by gut bacteria. Maybe in lack of nutrients bacteria will die off or hybernate???

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Certainly,  humans (like other animals) evolved to be able to deal with unpredictable food supply and times of food shortage.     I doubt very much that the gut lining (in a healthy person) gets significantly damaged simply because "gut bacteria are not getting the food they need' for some period of time.   Perhaps the healthy gut bacteria themselves benefit from intermittent fasting,  and they too may follow their own circadian rhythms.    It's not really a topic I've done much reading about,  though.

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