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coffee bean nutrition data?


Todd Allen
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Todd, as you've surely noticed, most publications deal with brewed cofee rather than cofee beans.

Even those carrying the coffee beans tag focus upon caffeine and other compounds, citing only chlorogenic acids as making up 12% of green coffee beans.

I wonder about the specific chapter in this book:

 

Chemical composition of coffee beans: an overview

Chapter · January 2018with 342 Reads
DOI: 10.19103/AS.2017.0022.11
In book: Achieving sustainable cultivaiton of coffee, pp.195-214
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Thanks mccoy.  I couldn't find your reference through scihub but it prompted me to search library genesis where I found several interesting books on the chemistry and biochemistry of coffee.   Perhaps one will contain a nutritional profile of coffee beans.  I'm curious about it because I've become fond of eating coffee beans in small quantities somewhat like a flavoring or spice often ground fine like cocoa powder but I have no idea what the nutritional profile looks like. 

Edited by Todd Allen
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Coffee Bean Composition 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee_bean#Composition

Nutritional Information, Diet Info and Calories in Coffee Bean, Roasted, Ground

https://www.fitbit.com/foods/Coffee+Bean+Roasted+Ground/29670

Eating Coffee Beans is Good for You!

https://www.thecoffeemaven.com/eating-coffee-beans/

 

Related Topics

16 Creative Ways to Use Old Coffee Grounds

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/uses-for-coffee-grounds

Coffee grounds may have nutritional value

https://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/coffee-grounds-may-have-nutritional-value-050815.htm

Coffee Flour Nutrition Facts and How to Use It

https://www.verywellfit.com/what-is-coffee-flour-4150604

What is Coffee Flour?

https://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/a19546579/what-is-coffee-flour/
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Btw,  I tried a teaspoon of ground roasted coffee mixed with dark Siberian honey--it was pretty tasty.    I might take that once and a while as an anti-depressive,  polyphenol-rich stimulant, maybe adding in some ground spices like cinnamon etc.

 

Going off topic a bit:  I  just ran into the  following article  which points to possibly double-edged effects of  some β-carbolines in coffee (and coffee substitutes such as chicory):

Neuroactive β-Carbolines Norharman and Harman in Coffee

https://kundoc.com/pdf-neuroactive-carbolines-norharman-and-harman-in-coffee-.html

 

Edited by Sibiriak
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5 hours ago, Sibiriak said:

Btw,  I tried a teaspoon of ground roasted coffee mixed with dark Siberian honey--it was pretty tasty.    I might take that once and a while as an anti-depressive,  polyphenol-rich stimulant, maybe adding in some ground spices like cinnamon etc.

 

Very nice idea, I'm going to have a stab at it, although I wouldn't know which variety to adopt.

Maybe Jamaica blue Mountains, which is regarded as one of the most renowned (and costly) types of coffee. Pretty costly but used in this context a one pound bag would last months (if not TOO good!)

 

Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
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220px-Jamaica_Blue_Mountain_Coffee_9494.
 
Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee packed for retail sales

Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee or Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee is a classification of coffee grown in the Blue Mountains of Jamaica. The coffee was introduced to Jamaica in 1728.[1]

The best lots of Blue Mountain coffee are noted for their mild flavour and lack of bitterness. Over the past few decades, this coffee has developed a reputation that has made it one of the most expensive and sought-after coffees in the world. Over 80% of all Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee is exported to Japan.[2] In addition to its use for brewed coffee, the beans are the flavor base of Tia Maria coffee liqueur.

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48 minutes ago, AlPater said:

"the coffee diterpenes cafestol
and kahweol are the primary hypercholestrolemic agents in
boiled coffee [22], and their removal by filters reduces the
lipid-raising potential of coffee"

Coffee drinking has been associated with reduced risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.  Perhaps testing unfiltered vs filtered could shed some light on whether this study's results are merely correlational or causal.

Higher Serum Cholesterol and Decreased Parkinson’s Disease Risk

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We spoke about the diterpenes in another thread, if memory serves me right sibiriak posted some papers on the benefits of such compounds.

By the way, the wiki voice on coffee beans does not cite these important molecules. 

The putative hypercholesterolemic effect is of interest even to those like me who consume lots of decaffeinated (unfiltered) coffee.

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