Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Gordo

What is the ideal IGF-1 level for longevity?

Recommended Posts

On 3/7/2019 at 11:37 AM, Gordo said:

... He also talks about changing protein requirements as we age, <80 you probably only need 0.8g/kg (40-50g protein/day for most people), over 80 you may need up to 50% more protein (about 70g for a 150lb person).  He eats animal products a few times a year.

While it is true that protein consumption and predicted longevity change as a person ages (and the comment made about biological age v chronological age is on point), the preponderance of the evidence is that animal protein is detrimental at any age, when compared to plant protein:

"The associations between animal and plant protein intake and the risk of mortality were examined by a prospective US cohort study involving 131,342 participants and 32 follow-up years [7]. Animal protein intake was related to a higher risk of mortality, particularly CVD mortality. In contrast, higher plant protein intake was associated with lower all-cause mortality. The substitution of animal protein from a variety of food sources, particularly processed red meat, with plant protein was associated with a lower risk of mortality, indicating that the protein source is important for long-term health."
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352396419302397#bb0020

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Ron Put said:

This is not supported by evidence.

If you accept the idea that avoiding obesity is important for health you might reconsider your position after hearing this brief commentary by Walter Willet:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Such a dumb debate.  Eating more calories than you burn makes you gain weight.  The only real exceptions are the few weird foods that you poop out without absorbing all their calories (some nuts and some fiber).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Gordo said:

... Eating more calories than you burn makes you gain weight.  The only real exceptions are the few weird foods that you poop out without absorbing all their calories (some nuts and some fiber).

Yep. That's a given.

I am not sure what the Walter Willet clip has to do with the subject matter. Eating 5000 calories of white corn is probably not a whole lot of a better idea than eating 5000 calories of bacon. I thought this was a discussion about longevity -- generally, obesity and longevity have an inverse correlation.

The study I pointed out was about substituting plant protein for animal protein, other things being equal. The study concludes that plant protein is significantly better longevity-wise. 

It's also worth noting that traditionally the subject population (Okinawans) consumed about 80% of the average calorie intake of the mainland Japanese population, so they effectively practiced CR. And as 85% of such intake is carbs (bitter leafy stuff and yams), the likelihood of "pooping out" some undigested calories is high).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Walter Willett: I've even had colleagues who said  you  can't get fat eating carbohydrates because the body can't convert carbohydrate to fat.

Hard to believe anyone at Harvard would make such a ridiculous claim.

 

Quote

Walter Willett: ...the percentage of calories from fat in the diet is not determinant  [of body weight.]

Indeed,   total calories/ energy balance  must be taken into account,  as Gordo pointed out.

Willett's dietary  recommendations:

Quote

At least one-third of early deaths could be prevented if everyone moved to a vegetarian diet, Harvard scientists have calculated.  Dr Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard Medical School said the benefits of a plant-based diet had been vastly underestimated.  Recent figures from the Office for National Statistics suggested that around 24 per cent or 141,000 deaths each year in Britain were preventable,  but most of that was due to smoking, alcohol or obesity.

But the new figures from Harvard suggest that at least 200,000 lives could be saved each year if people cut meat from their diets. 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/04/26/third-early-deaths-could-prevented-everyone-giving-meat-harvard/

 

Quote

It's worth noting that Willett's comments don't actually use the word “vegetarian”, but rather reference a "healthy" and “more plant-based diet”.

“I didn’t refer to vegetarians for several reasons,” Willett told IFLScience. “First, the replacement issue is critical; if we replace red meat with soda, refined starch, and sugar, we will probably not be better off and might be even worse off.

“However, if we replace it with a mix of nuts, beans, soy foods, and whole grains, we will have lower risks of heart disease, diabetes, and total mortality,” he noted. 

Willett emphasized that this isn't about a “simple dichotomy between being a vegetarian or not,” but instead the continuously lower risks related to greater shifts to a plant-based diet, with "healthy food replacing animal-based foods."

https://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/harvard-professor-says-this-kind-of-diet-would-cut-preventable-deaths-by-a-third/all/

 

Edited by Sibiriak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×