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So that unreliable, cherry picking Dr. Greger did a new video on coffee that raises some interesting possibilities:

 

For those of you that want to find out if you are a fast or slow metabolizer of caffeine - this is possible, but you will need an HRV monitor. Here is a protocol you could use:

https://digitalcommons.wku.edu/ijesab/vol8/iss2/56/

 

(Note that you can do other interesting things with HRV monitors to tweak your health if you missed prior discussion on that subject). You will want to use the free app "Elite HRV" coupled with one of the bluetooth HRV monitors they recommend, all the details were described previously here:

 

 

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Hi Gordo!

Interesting study -- if replicated in larger studies (this was a small study), it would indicate that HRV is reduced with coffee consumption.  If this is verified, next question:  decaf?

  --  Saul  

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If you've gotten your (partial) genome sequenced via 23andMe, you can check if you are a fast or slow caffeine metabolize via this link.

If your genotype is A/A for the SNP rs762551 (like mine), you are a "fast metabolizer" of caffeine and are likely to enjoy the positive effects of coffee consumption that Dr. Greger discusses.

--Dean

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I'm an A/A too - but I have no idea what my wife is (she's never had her genome sequenced). We're both coffee drinkers. My wife is a much bigger consumer of coffee than me, driking throughout the day. I limit myself to between 3 and 5 PM, usually once a day, rarely more - though I do consume quite a bit at a sitting, some 4-6 cups (straight, black or Dean's Witches Brew). But our reactions to coffee differ slightly. She suffers from withdrawal if no coffee is available. I can easily give up coffee with no ill effects, like when I go camping for two weeks for example. If I miss a coffee day, I don't even notice it. I can drink coffee, even strong multiple esspressos very late in the evening (like at a party), and have zero problems falling asleep. I can drink a lot of coffee and don't become jittery. Also, do you have the asparagus effect with coffee? I do, very soon after drinking, my urine has a strong coffee smell, wonder how common that is. 

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Interesting video--nicely produced and edited, at least. Not sure about any tangible bennies based on the those papers. 

My own coffee consumption habits--since commencing CR in late 1999-- have varied. Including many consecutive years with no consumption. 

For the past 3 years, consumption has been two cups French press light roast ( with 1T soy milk/cup), upon awaking in the morning. 

Coffee helps with mood , suppresses appetite, and ups thermogenesis (a nice warmup on cold days). That's my bottom line.

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6 hours ago, KHashmi317 said:

Coffee helps with mood , suppresses appetite, and ups thermogenesis (a nice warmup on cold days). That's my bottom line.

...and in the morning it consolidates the inception of the diurnal phase of the circadian cycle

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This is interesting and may (or may not) be beneficial in (fast-metabolizing?) humans:


"Coffee induces autophagy in vivo
 

Abstract

Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation of LC3B and the reduction of the abundance of the autophagic substrate sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1). These changes were accompanied by the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), leading to the reduced phosphorylation of p70S6K, as well as by the global deacetylation of cellular proteins detectable by immunoblot. Immunohistochemical analyses of transgenic mice expressing a GFP–LC3B fusion protein confirmed the coffee-induced relocation of LC3B to autophagosomes, as well as general protein deacetylation. Altogether, these results indicate that coffee triggers 2 phenomena that are also induced by nutrient depletion, namely a reduction of protein acetylation coupled to an increase in autophagy. We speculate that polyphenols contained in coffee promote health by stimulating autophagy."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4111762/

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