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FrederickSebastian

Romaine Lettuce vs. Cabbage Slaw

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Hi,

 

Last time I was in the store, looking for a base for my salad (which is most of my diet) I used cabbage slaw because:

1. Iceberg Lettuce is not nutrient-rich and

2. I like the consistency -- I want something fine.

 

I do NOT like typical square-shaped cut green leafy vegetables because of the shape -> I like to cut my romaine lettuce into diagonally sliced spaghetti-strands that are easier to eat and roll on a fork. My question is: is cabbage slaw as nutrient-rich as most green leafy vegetables or is it lacking like iceberg lettuce? I do not want to continue pouring empty calories into my body if cabbage slaw isn't the way to go...

 

Also -- is it important to get a VARIETY of green leafy vegetables or can I stick to mainly romaine and cabbage slaw, mixing things up now and then with field greens? Is there variety enough in most supermarkets' salad section to get a variety of green leafy vegetables or should I turn to online grocers/grow my own lettuces etc?

 

Thanks,

Fred

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Does the cabbage slaw have other ingredients in it (like mayo)? If so, that is going to dramatically alter the calorie density.

If you do use cabbage, red/purple cabbage has more nutrients than green cabbage.

Cabbage is also a cruciferous vegetable which is fantastic, but I would also want to get a lot of dark green leafys too, the darker the better. Do you find sinach objectionable (it's not square cut, at least not normally). Or a mesclun mix of some kind? A mesclun mix would give you a variety of dark green leafys.

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4 hours ago, Thomas G said:

Does the cabbage slaw have other ingredients in it (like mayo)? If so, that is going to dramatically alter the calorie density.

If you do use cabbage, red/purple cabbage has more nutrients than green cabbage.

Cabbage is also a cruciferous vegetable which is fantastic, but I would also want to get a lot of dark green leafys too, the darker the better. Do you find sinach objectionable (it's not square cut, at least not normally). Or a mesclun mix of some kind? A mesclun mix would give you a variety of dark green leafys.

Thomas -- yes I like all green leafy vegetables... mesculin and spinach included... Wow I did not know that red and purple cabbage has more nutrients... nice to know... Cabbage slaw does not have mayo in it -- it is basically like closeslaw without the dressing -- or just sliced cabbage... 

 

You say it is a terrific cruciferous vegetable -- does this mean it is nutrient rich? should I be eating this AS WELL AS or IN PLACE OF green leafy vegetables?

 

I would appreciate any help...

 

Fred

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Cruciferous vegetables include cabbages, kale, broccoli, arugula, brussels sprouts, collard greens, mustard greens and more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cruciferous_vegetables#List_of_cruciferous_vegetables

Definitely in addition to dark green leafys which are also great. But cruciferous are special because they produce sulforaphane as you eat them (so long as you are eating them raw, although there are a few tricks you can do to get sulforaphane from cooked cruciferous vegetables like adding a little bit of mustard or horseradish to them).

Surprisingly I wasn't able to find a short quick intro. This is long and super in depth.

 

 

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One useful reference is Dr fuhrman's ANDI score, which is probably what you wish, micronutrients density per calorie. I think that does not consider specific content like sulphoraphane or other phytochemicals. But it is a good suggestion, the veggies with higher scores are the best as far as micronutrient/calories ratio is concerned. It is not complete and some entries are not present in all countries. Also, I believe you should pick the most convenient solution for you as a base, then also rotate a little when possible. Some of thsoe entries cannot be eaten in large amounts raw. Also, oxalates are high in many.

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Edited by mccoy

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Your best resource is good nutrition software, most especially CRON-O-meter, which you should really be using for your entire diet in addition to helping you choose amongst foods. Its "Oracle" function is designed to help with the latter.

I'd agree with Thomas that when eating cabbage, there may be an advantage to going red or the anthocyanidins, tho' it's slightly higher in Calories so you can't just switch one-to-one.

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