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TomBAvoider

Blood Pressure

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On 5/27/2020 at 12:10 AM, Ron Put said:

drewab, these values are excellent, especially if without medication.

Mine seem to average 112/71 according to Qardio, since I started taking measurement about two weeks ago,.

As I average close to 2000 kcal per day, I don't know if I would place myself in the CR group, although my BMI is 18.5 today.

I would consider calorie restriction BMI less than 18.5 as people between 18.5 and 25 have normal calories and more than 25 high calories.

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8 minutes ago, gombo2 said:

I would consider calorie restriction BMI less than 18.5 as people between 18.5 and 25 have normal calories and more than 25 high calories.

This is not true. CR is not about body weight.

My BMI is around 18.5, I'm 5ft 7" and I eat 1500 k/cal per day.

There are many days when I eat even less - but I seem to be more resilient to weight loss than I used to be.

Edited by Matt

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11 minutes ago, Matt said:

This is not true. CR is not about body weight.

My BMI is around 18.5, I'm 5ft 7" and I eat 1500 k/cal per day.

In your opinion how many calories is considered CR? And why many CR practitioners do not exercise

Edited by gombo2

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9 hours ago, gombo2 said:

I would consider calorie restriction BMI less than 18.5 as people between 18.5 and 25 have normal calories and more than 25 high calories.

You can consider that a cutoff, but it is probably preferable to rely on some sort of scientific definition or consensus reached by a panel, governing body, and so forth, rather than just an opinion. 

For example, despite the fact that my BMI varies between 20.5-21.0 (I've been as low as 19.9 but didn't enjoy how I felt, though I did become a faster runner at that weight), many of my bloodwork markers indicate some level of CR including low WBC, low platelets, low levels of inflammation, low cholesterol, low testosterone, excellent fasting glucose/HBA1C, and resoundingly normal chemistry otherwise. The only exception I've ever noted otherwise was an IGF-1 reading that was somewhat higher, but otherwise in the normal range. I've only had this measured once as my physicians don't really see the need to do it, so perhaps it was attributable to something else.

Based on my bloodwork do I think I am mildly CR'd? Maybe. It's also equally possible that other practices I engage in like endurance training, cold exposure, and the likes also nudge me in the same direction... or perhaps it's the cumulative effect of both.

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Quote

In your opinion how many calories is considered CR? 

Assuming you have a normal adult body weight, you calculate your calories from your ad lib intake and reduce from there. Biomarkers are helpful to gauge whether or not things are going in the right direction that would normally happen on the diet. 

Why can't you just go by weight?

In 2005 I had a BMI of 16 and ate 1550 K/CAL per day.

In 2020 my BMI is just over 18.5 and I eat 1500 K/CAL per day.

There are days when I eat even less than 1500. 

At a higher weight I still have a low body temperature (35.5 degrees C), low blood pressure (90/60), low heart rate (50 bpm), low HbA1C (4.8% last measurement), lowish testosterone (not super low, but low end of normal), low cholesterol, usually a CRP that is under 1 mg/L, and other biomarkers indicating that I'm CR'd.

These are all helpful in being somewhat of a guide. The percentage of CR doesn't matter at all, it's whatever you can do SAFELY.

I'm not any less CR'd that I was back in 2005, it's just my body has become far more resilient to weight loss.

Edited by Matt

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7 hours ago, Matt said:

Assuming you have a normal adult body weight, you calculate your calories from your ad lib intake and reduce from there. Biomarkers are helpful to gauge whether or not things are going in the right direction that would normally happen on the diet. 

Why can't you just go by weight?

In 2005 I had a BMI of 16 and ate 1550 K/CAL per day.

In 2020 my BMI is just over 18.5 and I eat 1500 K/CAL per day.

There are days when I eat even less than 1500. 

At a higher weight I still have a low body temperature (35.5 degrees C), low blood pressure (90/60), low heart rate (50 bpm), low HbA1C (4.8% last measurement), lowish testosterone (not super low, but low end of normal), low cholesterol, usually a CRP that is under 1 mg/L, and other biomarkers indicating that I'm CR'd.

These are all helpful in being somewhat of a guide. The percentage of CR doesn't matter at all, it's whatever you can do SAFELY.

I'm not any less CR'd that I was back in 2005, it's just my body has become far more resilient to weight loss.

I am in CR my cholesterol is 163, glucose 81 and triglycerides 79?

Will losing 5 pounds a month make my blood low in micronutrients if I go on an ovolactovegetarian diet? When I lost 10 lbs in 1 month and in the last days of CR before I was admitted I was 700 calories a day and before the average was 1200- 1800 that month and I was being omnivorous and my nutrients went bad how much I can lose a month without spoiling the nutrients and if a person leaves the BMI below 14 and keeps it for a long time it also spoils the nutrients even without loss of weight and obese people who eat 1200 calories can spoil blood nutrients even on a no-nonsense diet?

oes body fat help to absorb nutrients and all nutrients if they are below normal shorten life, and if I have only one nutrient below normal example iron I will live less than I was overweight and all the right nutrients and elderly people need a higher percentage of fat to absorb nutrients.
If the BMI below 14 gives me an extreme longevity, how do I prevent my relatives from being admitted without being aggressive because I want to have a very low fat percentage and how often should I adjust the calories without disturbing other areas of life? ?

Edited by gombo2

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1 hour ago, gombo2 said:

If the BMI below 14 gives me an extreme longevity,

Fernando Gabriel, that's a huge IF....

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5 hours ago, gombo2 said:

If the BMI below 14 gives me an extreme longevity, how do I prevent my relatives from being admitted without being aggressive because I want to have a very low fat percentage and how often should I adjust the calories without disturbing other areas of life? ?

Mice that are on CR and are able to maintain a higher level of body fat on the diet live longer.

You should NOT aim for a BMI below 14. 

The only advice I will ever give to you is that you increase your BMI above 19 and that you eat a healthy diet. Stop obsessing over your body fat levels and your body weight. And don't do calorie restriction.

Aim to be healthy in your mind and your body. 

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Gombo , I totally agree with Matt! Don’t kill yourself trying to be healthy! You need adequate nutrition 1st and foremost! Use Cronometer.

Edited by Mike41

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That's nice, Dean. It's worth taking notes as to when the reading was taken, for example, whether not long after exercise, or after getting up in the morning etc.

Something that I think about these days is pulse pressure. Usually my BP is pretty low (as described in my first post), but occasionally, especially if the reading is taken by a nurse or some similar circumstance, my BP seems to shoot up, but in a pattern of just the SBP going up and the DBP remaining fairly low, so I can get a reading of like 110/60 - which is outside of the recommended about PP of 40. Anyhow, it's something worth keeping an eye on.

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14 minutes ago, TomBAvoider said:

It's worth taking notes as to when the reading was taken, for example, whether not long after exercise, or after getting up in the morning etc.

I take my BP in the late afternoon, a few hours after I've done eating for the day and about an hour after my final walk, sitting upright in a chair. 

--Dean 

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Hah, this inspired me to take my blood pressure.

Screenshot_2020-08-28-14-48-15-029_com.getqardio.android.jpg.d2eecc32b69578ad0d032dca04e0545e.jpg

 

This is lower than my normal evening BP, which seems to be in the lower 110s and lower 70s.

Livestrong makes a reasonably convincing argument for 115/75 to be close to optimum if I recall, as much lower numbers may be detrimental to certain organ functions, including the brain.  

I am fairly tall, so I cognisant of that too.  I don't have issues such as fainting spells, although recently my resting heart rate has dropped to between 39 and 42.  My doctor doesn't think I should worry about it.  If I remember, Dean's RHR is in the high 30s or low 40s.

 

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1 minute ago, Ron Put said:

If I remember, Dean's RHR is in the high 30s or low 40s.

RHR is the "42" in the image above. Occasionally it goes below 40 in which case my BP monitor gives up and displays an error code. 

--Dean 

 

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Wow!  Do you wear a tracker? If it's 42 in the middle of the day, it'd probably be lower when you are asleep.  You are one incredibly fit individual.  How often do you run these days?

I recently switched from a Fitbit Versa to a Garmin Venu and the Venu is much more accurate at tracking heart rate, GPS route, RHR, and virtually everything else, except possibly sleep.

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7 hours ago, Ron Put said:

Do you wear a tracker?

No. 

7 hours ago, Ron Put said:

How often do you run these days?

Two miles per day plus light resistance training for ~40min/day, and about 20 miles of walking per day. 

--Dean 

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