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FrederickSebastian

Problems with Olive Oil

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So,

 

Growing up (I'm 34) I remember hearing a lot about how extra virgin olive oil was really healthy for you, especially in Mediterranean-type diets... However, I recently read a webpage (http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=56) that says that cooking with EVOO is NOT healthy for some reason... Also, I read somewhere that unless you get EVOO fresh that has NOT been exposed to oxygen, you will not reap the benefits...

 

Do I have anything to worry about?

 

Fred

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Frederick, you should make sure that EVOO is of the latest crop. In Europe crops are usually from late October- to early december. Avoid EVOOS from North Africa. Order High Polyphenols EVOOS from reliable providers. Use very little for cooking and add most of it after cooking (hi temperatures affect the EVOO polyphenols).

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On 9/16/2019 at 3:35 AM, mccoy said:

Frederick, you should make sure that EVOO is of the latest crop. In Europe crops are usually from late October- to early december. Avoid EVOOS from North Africa. Order High Polyphenols EVOOS from reliable providers. Use very little for cooking and add most of it after cooking (hi temperatures affect the EVOO polyphenols).

ok!

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As noted elsewhere, I have restricted my previously liberal use of EVOO and now consume it only occasionally, usually if in a restaurant which serves it (I enjoy with good Italian bread). I don't consider it particularly healthy, but it is healthier than animal fat and thus good as a replacement for it.

To get most of the benefits of EVOO, consider olive leaf extract, which contains most of the good stuff, but without the fat.

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Olive oil is not good!

 

JACC Vol. 36, No. 5, 2000 November 1, 2000:1455–60
Conclusions. In terms of their effects on postprandial endothelial function, the beneficial components of the Mediterranean and Lyon Diet Heart Study diets appear to be the antioxidant-rich foods—vegetables, fruits, and their derivatives such as vinegar, and omega-3-rich fish and canola oils—not olive oil. Canola oil may share some of the unique vasoprotective properties of other omega-3-rich oils, such as fish oil. Dietary fruits, vegetables, and their products appear to provide some protection against the direct impair- ment in endothelial function produced by high-fat foods, including olive oil

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From a study Al posted today:

Associations of fat and carbohydrate intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality: prospective cohort study of UK Biobank participants.
Ho FK, Gray SR, Welsh P, Petermann-Rocha F, Foster H, Waddell H, Anderson J, Lyall D, Sattar N, Gill JMR, Mathers JC, Pell JP, Celis-Morales C.
BMJ. 2020 Mar 18;368:m688. doi: 10.1136/bmj.m688.
PMID: 32188587 Free Article
https://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/368/bmj.m688.full.pdf
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
To investigate the association of macronutrient intake with all cause mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and the implications for dietary advice.
DESIGN:
Prospective population based study.
SETTING:
UK Biobank.
PARTICIPANTS:
195 658 of the 502 536 participants in UK Biobank completed at least one dietary questionnaire and were included in the analyses. Diet was assessed using Oxford WebQ, a web based 24 hour recall questionnaire, and nutrient intakes were estimated using standard methodology. Cox proportional models with penalised cubic splines were used to study non-linear associations.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
All cause mortality and incidence of CVD.
RESULTS:
4780 (2.4%) participants died over a mean 10.6 (range 9.4-13.9) years of follow-up, and 948 (0.5%) and 9776 (5.0%) experienced fatal and non-fatal CVD events, respectively, over a mean 9.7 (range 8.5-13.0) years of follow-up. Non-linear associations were found for many macronutrients. Carbohydrate intake showed a non-linear association with mortality; no association at 20-50% of total energy intake but a positive association at 50-70% of energy intake (3.14 v 2.75 per 1000 person years, average hazard ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.28 (60-70% v 50% of energy)). A similar pattern was observed for sugar but not for starch or fibre. A higher intake of monounsaturated fat (2.94 v 3.50 per 1000 person years, average hazard ratio 0.58, 0.51 to 0.66 (20-25% v 5% of energy)) and lower intake of polyunsaturated fat (2.66 v 3.04 per 1000 person years, 0.78, 0.75 to 0.81 (5-7% v 12% of energy)) and saturated fat (2.66 v 3.59 per 1000 person years, 0.67, 0.62 to 0.73 (5-10% v 20% of energy)) were associated with a lower risk of mortality. A dietary risk matrix was developed to illustrate how dietary advice can be given based on current intake.
CONCLUSION:
Many associations between macronutrient intake and health outcomes are non-linear. Thus dietary advice could be tailored to current intake. Dietary guidelines on macronutrients (eg, carbohydrate) should also take account of differential associations of its components (eg, sugar and starch).

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I am curious, what is the average intake and ratio of monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and saturated fat, as well as Omega-3 and and Omega-6 for those who track such things here?

Here is mine, averaged over the last 4 weeks. Top fat intake in descending order is from flax, almonds, avocado, walnuts and cacao nibs. The cholesterol is from tiramisu, pizza and butter (I lapse when I go out :)

2111799477_ScreenShot2020-04-01at17_09_28.png.715fcf5ffd4b65941e336b43b74147cc.png

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On 9/1/2019 at 6:59 PM, FrederickSebastian said:

I recently read a webpage (http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=56) that says that cooking with EVOO is NOT healthy for some reason... Also, I read somewhere that unless you get EVOO fresh that has NOT been exposed to oxygen, you will not reap the benefits...

Do I have anything to worry about?


This reasonably narrow question got spun off into a whole discussion about the healthfulness of EVOO per se, with a bunch of random half-relevant assertions and data points ... please see here on EVOO as supreme health food (my post of July 3 — I would expect the main thing Gordo originally had in mind when linking the thread) and stop making assertions on lower-grade evidence.

Closer to the core question, see my post on EVOO freshness, storage, and cooking.

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