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DHL

Maybe the key is flexibility

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When you get old blood vessels, the heart, body tissues all get stiff.............

Maybe the key to extended longevity is somehow imparting cellular “flexibility” to the circulatory system.

Yeah, probably impossible.

 

 

Edited by DHL

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Sounds like you're talking about endothelial function. Here are some videos from Dr. Greger... note that his videos are not trustworthy for every topic, but he gives an efficient explanation of this phenomenon. I would ignore the bit in the first video where he says the mechanism of vegetables is antioxidants neutralizing free radicals. That's just a theory. The nitrates are probably more relevant (as in the second video).

https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-power-of-no/

https://nutritionfacts.org/video/oxygenating-blood-with-nitrate-rich-vegetables/

https://nutritionfacts.org/video/walnuts-and-artery-function/

https://nutritionfacts.org/video/sodium-and-arterial-function-a-salting-our-endothelium/

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3 hours ago, Mikii said:

Sounds like you're talking about endothelial function

 

And the closely related concept of  arterial stiffness as well.

 

Quote

 

Cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of mortality in the Western world [1], has a very long asymptomatic phase of development, starting as early as the first decade of life [2]. It is imperative, therefore, that clinical scientists and epidemiologists have at their disposal simple, valid, and reliable techniques to assess and track the progression of CVD. Noninvasive assessment techniques fall under two broad categories: those that assess endothelial health and those that assess arterial stiffness. Assessment of endothelial function indicates the functional health of the vascular system, whereas arterial stiffness assesses structural characteristics. Together, these techniques may provide complimentary indices of CVD risk.

* * *

Arterial stiffness is a general term that collectively describes distensiblility, compliance, and elastic modulus of the arterial vascular system.

* * *

Functionally, the endothelium is a large autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine organ that plays a key role in vascular homeostasis [95]. Endothelial dysfunction is a pivotal, yet potentially reversible, step that has been shown to precede and predict overt CVD [96]. The endothelium has been recognized for the important role it plays in regulating vascular reactivity via the release of dilator mediators, including nitric oxide (NO) [97100], prostaglandins [101], and endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor [102, 103]. The capacity of the endothelium to regulate vascular tone (reactivity) is used to confirm the health of the endothelium.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3361177/

 

 

Quote

The inability to easily predict the likelihood of a cardiovascular event at the individual level [1,2,3,4] has led to interest in developing instruments capable of diagnosing early stage cardiovascular disease (CVD), before the appearance of symptoms. It is thought that arterial stiffening and endothelial dysfunction are among the earliest vascular properties altered with the onset of CVD [5, 6]. Accordingly, a number of important CVD risk factors, including hypertension, lifestyle and age, have a strong association with both arterial stiffening and endothelial dysfunction [7,8,9,10,11,12].

Arterial stiffening, or a decrease in the ability of an artery to distend due to structural changes in the components of the elastic artery walls [13,14,15], results in the transmission of damaging pulsatile flow through the circulatory system. This parameter can be assessed through measurement of blood flow rate (pulse wave velocity, PWV) or by analysis of the shape of the arterial pressure waveform (pulse wave analysis, PWA), which provides an augmentation index (AIx) that is based on reflection of the pulse wave from branch points in the arterial tree [16].

In endothelial dysfunction, the cells lining the artery wall become unable to respond to shear stress as a result of changes in blood flow, and this in turn affects arterial tone. As a result, it is possible to measure endothelial dysfunction via reactive hyperemia (RHI), which measures arterial dilatation in response to a brief period of ischemia [17]

https://bmccardiovascdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12872-019-1167-3

 

 

Edited by Sibiriak

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On 11/17/2019 at 8:00 PM, DHL said:

When you get old blood vessels, the heart, body tissues all get stiff.............

Maybe the key to extended longevity is somehow imparting cellular “flexibility” to the circulatory system.

Yeah, probably impossible.

 

 

Avoiding calcification of endolethial tissue is possible.

You need to ensure adequate vitamin D3 and magnesium intake; but what really seems to get the calcium back into bones where it belongs is vitamin K.

Read up on vitamin K, and in particular the K2-MK4 and MK7 seem to be very valuable and worth supplementing with.

 

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