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KHashmi317

David Sinclair: "Lifespan: Why We Age and Why We Don't Have To" | Talks at Google

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Sinclair pub'd what I think is his first popular book: 

Lifespan: Why We Age―and Why We Don't Have To

(sept 2019)

A preview is here:

 

Edited by KHashmi317

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After watching the Google Talk, a few things to note...

Sinclair's promotion of various compounds -- most recently NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) -- have been criticized:

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/beyond-resveratrol-the-anti-aging-nad-fad/

Sinclair seems to endorse regular fasting, but makes no references to calorie restriction per se. Unfortunate.

Sinclair's wikipedia entry is insightful. It should be a "pre-read" before investing in his new hardcover.

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17 hours ago, KHashmi317 said:

Sinclair pub'd what I think is his first popular book: 

Lifespan: Why We Age―and Why We Don't Have To

(sept 2019)

A preview is here:

 

Sinclair gave the annual talk on aging at the University of Rochester at the end of the Spring term in the bio department last year.  I think that i posted a note about it.

  --  Saul

P.S.: He was pushing NMN.  But, also, he did indicate that he's practicing Calorie Restriction.

Edited by Saul
Add some info

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The use of NMN, Metformin, etc. by LEists  is not new. In any case, several of the YouTube comments noted Sinclair looks young for his age (50/51).

A brief overview of his personal molecule and fasting/diet regimen was presented in this 11 min video (edited down from the 2hr Joe Rogan 2019 interview):

 

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This book has been repeatedly discussed in various threads around here. As I've said before, I've read the book (along with other commenters here), and was not super impressed. Sinclair has a tendency to jump the gun and let his enthusiasm get ahead of the evidence. I'm afraid NMN will transpire to be another hype that doesn't live up to the billing. Odd to see it resurrected here, but maybe if you haven't read the book these clips can be interesting.

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6 hours ago, TomBAvoider said:

This book has been repeatedly discussed in various threads around here. As I've said before, I've read the book (along with other commenters here), and was not super impressed. Sinclair has a tendency to jump the gun and let his enthusiasm get ahead of the evidence. I'm afraid NMN will transpire to be another hype that doesn't live up to the billing. Odd to see it resurrected here, but maybe if you haven't read the book these clips can be interesting.

I rarely read entire books anymore (except maybe some novels, and many in audiobook format).  There are way too many interesting  books, and putting in the time for even a few means less "investigative"  time for other topics. Also books have sort of "sunk cost" effect. Even if you borrow them from the library,  time sunk in reading can psychologize you to accept their viewpoints.  There are ways to have your cake, though: Many of the major pop-sci books have summary articles in various pop-sci mags (Sci Am, New Sci, etc). And then there are the myriad podcasts and YouTube book promos (Google, etc) that distill the bottomline into PP slides and bullet points.

I do think that video (and audio) can add to (or subtract from) whatever the author is selling or pushing ... shaky voice or nervous presentation might indicate he isn't all that confident in his arguments.

 .... Back to Sinclair ... I actually watched the entire 2hr Joe Rogan interview (sept 2019). The strategies Sinclair suggests (practices himself) in supplementing (Resv., NMN, Met, etc) seem quite complicated ... timing, with or w/o meal, with or w/o protein, fat. Also, alternating heavy exercise days with supplement days. Maybe the "hobbying" aspect is fun for some. Still, the molecules are highly experimental, and $$$. 

Also -- and I noted this before on the List -- are the synergistic effects of CR and molecule supplementation -- unknown at best, risky at worst . 

Edited by KHashmi317

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Sinclair’s only interest is selling crap. The only person that benefits what from Sinclair’s is Sinclair, his bank account.

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On 1/13/2020 at 8:46 PM, DHL said:

The only person that benefits what from Sinclair’s is Sinclair, his bank account.

The wiki entry notes the buyout of his company: "Sirtris went public in 2007 and was subsequently purchased and made a subsidiary of GlaxoSmithKline in 2008 for $720 million."

I hope he put some of that $$ into good use. 

Problems with LE "companies" are:

--no clear vision/direction (biology is really hard stuff ... those molecular pathways, etc. ... yikes!!)

--high turnover rate (e.g., "At the end of 2017 and the beginning of 2018, Calico lost two top scientists; in December 2017 Hal Barron, its head of R&D, left for GlaxoSmithKline, and in March 2018 Daphne Koller, who was leading their AI efforts, left to pursue a venture in applying machine learning techniques to drug design.")

--sensitivity to markets and VC schema (“Grow fast, lose money, go public, get rich. That’s the model.”
― Dan Lyons, Disrupted: My Misadventure in the Start-Up Bubble)

--etc. (much more ...!!)

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A few thoughts of Sinclair and his use of Shannon's information theory (I haven't read the book; only going by the Google talk)....

Sinclair uses CDs as examples of information carriers. First, that the music signal can be reconstructed if you use enough samples (based on highest freq. in the audio signal). Second, that CDs can get scratched, but may be re-polished to make them workable. 

The audio fidelity of CDs is matter of huge debate in the high-end audiophile world. Many claim vinyl LPs sound better despite specs (measurements) being "worse". 

Also, and even as metaphor, "equating" biological information to digital (signal) information is pretty big stretch. I hate to use yet another Star Trek example, but ... from episode The Ultimate Computer (1968)... Mr Spock's logic prevails, of course ;)

KIRK: Have you located the malfunction, Doctor? 
DAYSTROM: As I suspected, it is not a malfunction. M-5 was merely shutting down power to areas of the ship that do not require it. 
Decks four and six are living quarters, are they not? 
KIRK: Yes, that's correct. 
DAYSTROM: And currently unoccupied. 
SPOCK: I am not familiar with these instruments, Doctor. You are using an entirely new type of control mechanism. However, it appears to me this unit is drawing more power than before. 
DAYSTROM: Quite right. As the unit is called upon to do more work, it pulls more power to enable it to do what is required of it, just as the human body draws more energy to run than to stand still. 
SPOCK: Doctor, this unit is not a human body. The computer can process information, but only the information which is put into it. 
KIRK: Granted, it can work a thousand, a million times faster than the human brain, but it can't make a value judgment. It hasn't intuition. It can't think. 
DAYSTROM: Can't you understand? The multitronic unit is a revolution in computer science. I designed the duotronic elements used in your ship right now, and I know they are as archaic as dinosaurs compared to the M-5. A whole new approach. 

http://www.chakoteya.net/StarTrek/53.htm

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On 1/15/2020 at 10:13 AM, KHashmi316 said:

... The audio fidelity of CDs is matter of huge debate in the high-end audiophile world. Many claim vinyl LPs sound better despite specs (measurements) being "worse". ...

There may still be a debate, but it doesn't meant that those "high-end audiophiles" know what they are talking about, or understand physics and human hearing.

Ignorance and bias are a really good thing for "high end audiophile" manufacturers.

 

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