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Shezian

Mushroom supplements to boost immune system

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17 hours ago, Gordo said:

The pic is of shiitake mushrooms, you are probably better off just eating the shiitake mushrooms and maybe some garlic to go with it too.

I agree with Gordo. Better to eat the whole mushroom:

"Active hexose correlated compound, or AHCC, is a proprietary medicinal mushroom extract intended to strengthen the immune system. In the past, the formula was considered a trade secret of the Japanese manufacturer, so we don’t know for sure what’s in it other than a combination of several species of Basidiomycete mushrooms, including shiitake (which has been shown to have anti-cancer effects).
...

Until we know more about whether AHCC works as advertised, I suggest that your sister-in-law consider the mushrooms I recommend to cancer patients for their proven immune-enhancing and anti-cancer effects:

Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor), is a common medicinal mushroom shown to have anticancer effects in ongoing research in this country. Use liquid or encapsulated extracts.

Maitake (Grifola frondosa) is an edible mushroom known in the U.S. as “hen of the woods” because in appearance it resembles the fluffed tail feathers of a nesting hen. In addition to its anti-cancer, anti-viral and immune-enhancing properties, maitake may also help reduce blood pressure and blood sugar.

Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum) is too bitter to eat but is widely available in teabags, capsules and liquid extracts. Animal studies have shown that reishi improves immune function and inhibits the growth of some malignant tumors; it is also a natural anti-inflammatory agent.

Agaricus blazei (Agaricus brasiliensis) contains beta glucans, a group of polysaccharides (complex sugars) believed responsible for this mushroom’s immune-boosting effects. Research has shown that Agaricus has anti-tumor and anti-viral activity, as well as moderating effects on blood sugar and cholesterol. Oncologists in both Japan and Brazil use this mushroom in treatment protocols. It is sold in the U.S. in dried form as well as in extracts."

https://www.drweil.com/health-wellness/body-mind-spirit/cancer/mushrooms-against-cancer/

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11 hours ago, Matt said:

I have that brand of AHCC but only keep it at hand for when I think I need it. I frequently take beta-glucan from NOW Foods (taking 5 capsules per day right now ) as AHCC can be a bit expensive. 

Here's a bit more information from a couple of articles I wrote on AHCC and Beta-Glucan for immunity. 🙂  

http://www.crvitality.com/2018/07/ahcc-benefits-and-side-effects/

http://www.crvitality.com/2019/01/beta-glucan-vs-ahcc/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6942843/

A recent review of Ahcc. I was a bit disappointed although it might help, but just not enough good research. Mostly mouse studies

Edited by Mike41

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BTW wouldn’t plain old oats and barley be immune enhancing? It would seem so. After all they are good sources of beta glucans

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30049632

As for mushroom consumption I thought this article was helpful as to how Much?

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/well/eat/what-is-the-health-and-nutritional-value-of-mushrooms.html?referringSource=articleShare

Edited by Mike41

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Thought l would write my experience with taking mushroom supplements for 2 months. I started taking these to increase my natural killer cells and it worked a treat. The results of my last blood test showed all my white blood cells within the normal range. Not sure if its because of the mushroom supplements and the garlic supplements l took, but it was great news. On the negative side, l noticed a few weeks back my face complexion looked a bit yellow, and have now decided to stop taking them for a month to see if my complexion will go back to normal,  I hope l haven't damaged my liver. So supplements seemed to benefit for immunity, but with possible unwanted side effects. 

The breakdown of these supplements are per tablet: (I took one per day)

Shitake 2g

Reishi 1g

Cordyceps 1g

Snow fungus 1g 

Turkey tail 500mg

 

 

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11 hours ago, Shezian said:

Thought l would write my experience with taking mushroom supplements for 2 months....

 

I am glad your numbers are better. Whether the supplements helped in your case is another matter. I take a gram of turkey tail on most days and eat mushrooms (portabella, shitake, oyster, maitake, etc.) a few times a week, in much larger quantities than what's on your list.

Reishi is the only mushroom in your list I am aware of for which there is some evidence that it may cause liver damage after prolonged exposure, but if I recall the study, it was at larger doses and over 90 days. I know nothing about Snow Fungus.

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Can l ask why you take Turkey Tail and how much do you take daily?

I am not  trying  Maitake 600mg and Beta Glucan supplements. Do you have any knowledge on these?

 

 

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On 4/23/2020 at 6:13 PM, Shezian said:

Can l ask why you take Turkey Tail and how much do you take daily?

I am not  trying  Maitake 600mg and Beta Glucan supplements. Do you have any knowledge on these?

Based on what I've read, I am fairly confident that some mushrooms are beneficial to health, so I consume them on most days.

Turkey Tail is best taken by capsules, since to some the taste is rather unpleasant (I take 2 capsules of 1g each nowadays, but used to take powdered mushrooms, from a seller in Oregon, I believe).

Here is some quick info:

Turkey Tail Mushrooms For Cancer Treatment?

"Researchers at the University of Minnesota and Bastyr University conducted the study in women with stages I-III breast cancer who had completed radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Results showed that immune function was enhanced in the women who took daily doses of turkey tail in pill form. (The actual product used in the study was Host Defense Turkey Tail mushroom from Fungi Perfecti.) The researchers reported that the improved immune response was dose dependent and that none of the subjects suffered any adverse effects."

If you need convincing, see this: FDA Approves Bastyr Turkey Tail Trial for Cancer Patients (it's nowadays approved treatment, but I don't have time to search for it. It also works for dogs).

Weil also mentions maitake (I buy these fresh from Whole Foods, they are rather tasty, to me at least :)

"Maitake (Grifola frondosa) is an edible mushroom known in the United States as “hen of the woods” because it resembles the fluffed tail feathers of a nesting hen. In addition to its anti-cancer, anti-viral and immune-enhancing properties, maitake may also reduce blood pressure and blood sugar."

Edited by Ron Put

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On 2/27/2020 at 10:57 AM, Thomas G said:

Don't most people who practice CR have lower than normal white blood cells? And is that necessarily a bad thing?

It is certainly true for me. Out of curiosity I looked back to several blood tests I have had done over the past 6 months and this was my WBC count. The range indicated is 4.0-11.0 at the lab I go to.

  • April 2020 - 4.5 (borderline low)
  • Late January 2020 - 2.8 (below range)
  • Early January 2020 - 3.4 (below range)
  • December 2019 - 3.3 (below range)

Is this necessarily a bad thing? I'm not entirely sure but I do know that it's very common amongst CRON-ies and seems fairly common amongst those on a plant-based diet. The other biomarkers regularly low on my bloodwork is my platelet count, as well as testosterone. As for the topic of consuming mushrooms, I regularly use them in a culinary sense and have been gifted a lot of products from Four Sigmatic (mushroom coffee extracts) for Christmas. While I have consumed a variety of their non-caffeinated products including their lion's mane, chaga, and reishi, as well as their caffeinated mushroom coffee, green tea, and cocoa mix, it is not something I would recommend to purchase.  On a side note, you know you're a bit different when people buy you 6 boxes of mushroom coffee for Christmas. 

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3 hours ago, drewab said:

It is certainly true for me. Out of curiosity I looked back to several blood tests I have had done over the past 6 months and this was my WBC count. The range indicated is 4.0-11.0 at the lab I go to....

I just looked at my WBC count and it's 4.6. Three years earlier, which is before I started reducing calories and eating within an ~8hr window, my WBC was 5.6. My BMI was around 20 three years ago and it's 19 today. So, it appears that CR lowers WBC count.

WBC at the lower end appear beneficial to longevity. You can plug in various numbers and see how it impacts your predicted Phenotypic Age based on the Levine spreadsheet I posted a while back.

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On 4/25/2020 at 11:23 PM, drewab said:

It is certainly true for me. Out of curiosity I looked back to several blood tests I have had done over the past 6 months and this was my WBC count. The range indicated is 4.0-11.0 at the lab I go to.

  • April 2020 - 4.5 (borderline low)
  • Late January 2020 - 2.8 (below range)
  • Early January 2020 - 3.4 (below range)
  • December 2019 - 3.3 (below range)

Is this necessarily a bad thing? I'm not entirely sure but I do know that it's very common amongst CRON-ies and seems fairly common amongst those on a plant-based diet. The other biomarkers regularly low on my bloodwork is my platelet count, as well as testosterone. As for the topic of consuming mushrooms, I regularly use them in a culinary sense and have been gifted a lot of products from Four Sigmatic (mushroom coffee extracts) for Christmas. While I have consumed a variety of their non-caffeinated products including their lion's mane, chaga, and reishi, as well as their caffeinated mushroom coffee, green tea, and cocoa mix, it is not something I would recommend to purchase.  On a side note, you know you're a bit different when people buy you 6 boxes of mushroom coffee for Christmas. 

Thanks so much for sharing your results. Was your doctor ever concerned about your low WBC? How old are you?  

Mushroom coffee. Never heard of it before.  Interesting to see your WBC, so it seems it can fluctuate a fair bit. Good to know l am not the only one.  It concerned me as l was catching more colds than normal. Every few months l was getting a sore throat or felt sinus build up. So for 3 months, l increased my calories, stopped intense exercise, (recommend by my doctor),  and gained weight, had mushrooms, zinc and garlic supplants daily,  and my bloods have improved. Now l would like to lose the weight  l gained, hopefully the colds and sore throats will not return.  

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On 4/26/2020 at 3:15 AM, Ron Put said:

I just looked at my WBC count and it's 4.6. Three years earlier, which is before I started reducing calories and eating within an ~8hr window, my WBC was 5.6. My BMI was around 20 three years ago and it's 19 today. So, it appears that CR lowers WBC count.

WBC at the lower end appear beneficial to longevity. You can plug in various numbers and see how it impacts your predicted Phenotypic Age based on the Levine spreadsheet I posted a while back.

It seems increases calories also increases WBC. The doctor said l had some sore of virus, hence why l had lower natural killer cells and it will go up over time. He also said if they don't go up we would need to do extra investigation, and these fluctuates happen more in the younger people.  But in the end it does seem more prevalent amongst us calorie restrictors. 

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On 4/27/2020 at 6:00 PM, Shezian said:

It seems increases calories also increases WBC....

I just came across a study showing the relationship of sleep deprivation and WBC (and it's not a good thing):

Sleep restriction increases white blood cells, mainly neutrophil count, in young healthy men: A pilot study

Objectives:

This study examines the effects of sleep restricted to four hours for three consecutive nights on blood parameters, known to be associated with cardiovascular risk, in young healthy men.

Material and methods:

Eight young healthy men (age 24.5 ± 3.3 years) were studied in the sleep restricted group. Nine young healthy men (age 24 ± 2 years) were included in the control group and spent the days and nights in the sleep lab, while sleeping eight hours/night. One baseline night was followed by three nights of sleep restriction to four hours and by one recovery night of eight hours. Blood samplings were performed after the baseline night and after the third night of sleep restriction or without restriction for the control group.

Results:

A significant increase in white blood cells (WBC) (5.79 ± 1.05 vs. 6.89 ± 1.31 103 cell/μl, p = 0.03), and neutrophils (3.17 ± 0.69 vs 4.24 ± 0.97 103 cell/μl, p = 0.01) was observed after the third night of sleep restriction. Other blood parameters were not affected. No significant variation was observed in the control group.

Conclusion:

Sleep restriction affected WBC count, mainly neutrophils, considered as risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Stress induced by the short term sleep restriction could be involved in this observation.

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5 minutes ago, Ron Put said:

I just came across a study showing the relationship of sleep deprivation and WBC (and it's not a good thing):

Sleep restriction increases white blood cells, mainly neutrophil count, in young healthy men: A pilot study

Objectives:

This study examines the effects of sleep restricted to four hours for three consecutive nights on blood parameters, known to be associated with cardiovascular risk, in young healthy men.

Material and methods:

Eight young healthy men (age 24.5 ± 3.3 years) were studied in the sleep restricted group. Nine young healthy men (age 24 ± 2 years) were included in the control group and spent the days and nights in the sleep lab, while sleeping eight hours/night. One baseline night was followed by three nights of sleep restriction to four hours and by one recovery night of eight hours. Blood samplings were performed after the baseline night and after the third night of sleep restriction or without restriction for the control group.

Results:

A significant increase in white blood cells (WBC) (5.79 ± 1.05 vs. 6.89 ± 1.31 103 cell/μl, p = 0.03), and neutrophils (3.17 ± 0.69 vs 4.24 ± 0.97 103 cell/μl, p = 0.01) was observed after the third night of sleep restriction. Other blood parameters were not affected. No significant variation was observed in the control group.

Conclusion:

Sleep restriction affected WBC count, mainly neutrophils, considered as risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Stress induced by the short term sleep restriction could be involved in this observation.

Very interesting, l was always under the impression that sleep actually improve immune system parameters. Goes to show l was incorrect. 

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21 hours ago, Shezian said:

l was always under the impression that sleep actually improve immune system parameters. Goes to show l was incorrect.

White blood cell counts increase in response to infection, trauma, stress, tumor, etc.

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On 4/29/2020 at 5:50 AM, Shezian said:

Very interesting, l was always under the impression that sleep actually improve immune system parameters. Goes to show l was incorrect. 

Not at all, as a matter of fact, sleep is the main (empirical) remedy presently suggested against a SARS-COV 2 infection, due to its indisputable benefits to optimize the immune system.

As Gordo writes, an excess of WBC is not good, whereas an optimum amount is desirable. My take is that WBCs are able to proliferate, so probably the factors which govern are the efficiency of the signaling system and the prompt proliferation response of the cells. The low-range WBC in CR practitioners may be due to the usually very low levels of inflammation markers.

Probably this aspect has been discussed in previous threads.

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I agree with Gordo and mccoy above.

As an aside, I was listening to a short TEDx video while driving this morning and at about the 10 minute mark, the speaker discusses the fact that light provides portion of the energy which helps blood flow, among other things.  So, while it appears to be a minute effect, it got me thinking if covering our bodies has a small deleterious effect on blood flow, at least theoretically.  Perhaps the nudists got it right?  :D
 

 

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