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I don't care about aesthetics or how it looks - I'm a fairly thick skinned individual and figure if others don't like it they can go pound sand :) - as it is, my head, face, neck are pretty much fully covered to the point where it looks like a beekeeper headpiece - just to avoid excess UV exposure, and some people do a double take, but mostly nobody cares.

Indeed, trying to avoid high traffic areas is common sense, but I live in LA (West Hollywood) - and sadly, this means high traffic is pretty much everywhere. Now, of course, right next to a freeway or major street is going to be worse, but nowhere is it "good". I run on a track in a park that's about a block away from a very major street (Santa Monica Blvd.), so it's not ideal by any means and I could really use a mask. Wrt. the breathing, that's a concern, though not a catastrophy - I do daily PowerBreathing exercises:

https://www.amazon.com/POWERbreathe-Heavy-Reistance-Black-LSI-Plus-3B/dp/B001O67BYM/

So I'm not put off by a bit of breathing resistance - there are even special masks some athletes use for exactly this purpose, to obstruct breathing and exercise those muscles while running... not sure how beneficial that is exactly, but it shows it can be done. What is worse, is that I unfortunately have mucous problems on about 75% of my runs - my nose starts flowing around the 8th lap (like clockwork - not 7th and not 9th - on the days it does); this is not a big deal as I always carry two tissues for just this purpose. But with the mask, I can see this becoming a major problem.

Anyhow, I'll have to think about this. I'm very tempted. What's stopping me from immediately ordering one on Amazon is the very large number of really negative reviews. I'll still probably get it. Thanks, Khurram!

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Didn't know about Amazon. I heard about the product on some cycling forums. I've always gotten it direct from the manuf. 

It's easy to pull the mask down and back up with one hand. You don't need to unstrap. That's what I do on the beach path.

Oh, BTW, I've ALWAYS gotten the "Techno" (Large) model:

https://respro.com/store/product/techno-mask

I did look at the Amazon entry for this model too and its got v. good reviews ... not sure what you saw??

Hope that helps!

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Thanks Khurram! Re: Amazon reviews - you linked to the X-Large where you find 14 OK reviews (on average), but if you click on the M-medium size, you now see 67 reviews and the average is bad. Same mask, but I'd probably spring for the M rather than X-Large, and that gives me poor reviews, YMMV. 

Anyhow, I'll go ahead and order the M size from Amazon, and hope for the best. Thank you again!

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I do aerobics I am 18 years old and 1.82 tall and 56 kg the last time I had blood tests I was sedentary and 63 kg and was eating a lot at college, I get around a lot every day at home and I give 2 or 3 jumps a day, I consider my CR to be a pseudo CR because if I were sedentary I would need 1400-1600 to maintain my weight but I think like 2000-2500, I think that to be in real CR with my size I would have to eat less than 2000 calories , in the last exam my average calories were high i gained 4kg in the month before the exam the exam gave HDL cholesterol 34 LDL 118 total 168 glucose 77 a month later i measured my pressure was 110/70 mmhg, that way i not reach 50 years old.

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not reach 50 years old

You need to get your lipid profile sorted. LDL of 118 is a bit high, especially combined with the definitely low HDL of 34. Exercise elevates HDL, so focus on that. Your goal should be cardio-respiratory fitness, as that is associated with better health and survival. One thing you can definitely watch is your RHR - with enough exercise, your RHR (Resting Heart Rate) should go down, so that's a good measure of how well you're doing - shoot for 50's, not higher than 60. Low RHR is associated with better survival. Back in the day I used to have fairly highish RHR of 68-70, and through exercise lowered it to my current 52. As far as CR, don't stress too much. Concentrate on not overeating and a healthy diet. With time, if you are disciplined, and your diet supplies all your micronutrient needs, you'll find that your calorie intake naturally goes down - if you maintain a BMI of 19 or so, you should be fine.

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4131752/

 

the article above is by the cooper institute and appears to be very well done. The reduction in cardiovascular disease, which imho is a solid indicator that the exercise is adequate/optimal etc. flattens out with 51 minutes a week of jogging!! That’s about 7 1/2 minutes a day!!!!  Not only that it’s at less then 6 miles per hour! So not exactly anything extreme. Do the math. That’s less than 6 miles of jogging a week! You guys need to cut back man. Your overdoing it.

as for getting the exercise that is optimal and not overdoing it wrt knees feet of course Kashmir is correct that biking is an option. Another option is to find a long hill and walk up it fast. I’ve found one away from any traffic and it takes me about 8 minutes to climb it.my heart pounds and my breathe tells me I’m doing enough and best of all I only need 16 minutes total. I walk down the hill and that’s my warmup. Then I walk back to my parked car very fast and I’m done. Other than that I try to break up my day with light activity at least every hour and also about 5 minutes of resistance training with some barbells, pushups,sit ups and squats.

Mike Colella

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You have to take this with a grain of salt. Looking at the study, the optimal parameters for all-cause mortality are as follows:

1) Frequency of running: 1-2 times a week

2) Speed 7.1-7.5 mph

3) Distance per week: 9-12 miles

4)Total time per week: >150 min <176 min

There really is no way to hit all of these 4 parameters at the same time.

Take 151 min per week (lowermost optimal value) - then run at speed of 7.1 mph (lowermost optimal value) that translates into 17.8 miles a week - and the optimum per week is no more than 12 miles a week. So even running the lowest optimum time at the lowest optimum speed still takes you to MORE than the optimal number of miles a week. 

The numbers are impossible to work out. You are going to fall sub-optimal somewhere along the line. Also, the numbers are very close across the quintiles, so I wouldn't sweat it necessarily.

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On 2/16/2020 at 11:32 AM, KHashmi317 said:

... use a Respro anti-pollution mask (and have done so for over 10 years. ). 

respro-metro-anti-pollution-mask.jpg

Just checked the Respro web site ... you are now put into a waiting queue before you can enter the site. 

Also, all product links to Respro have been removed from Amazon.

Despite my praise for their products (part of the reason for that being them being the only game in town for THIS type of product), I have always been aware of the company's/products drawback. For one. they were very aggressive in marketing -- incl. frequent marketing emails. Also: their products are $$; not that durable; and fitting (choosing correct size) is not easy.

I'm not sure if this waiting queue is not a marketing ploy.

In any case, I'm hoping the pandemic forces innovation and evolution in the anti-pollution mask industry.  Especially the (hepa) FILTER ...

filter-techno__zoom.jpg

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On 2/17/2020 at 4:05 PM, TomBAvoider said:

not reach 50 years old

You need to get your lipid profile sorted. LDL of 118 is a bit high, especially combined with the definitely low HDL of 34. Exercise elevates HDL, so focus on that. Your goal should be cardio-respiratory fitness, as that is associated with better health and survival. One thing you can definitely watch is your RHR - with enough exercise, your RHR (Resting Heart Rate) should go down, so that's a good measure of how well you're doing - shoot for 50's, not higher than 60. Low RHR is associated with better survival. Back in the day I used to have fairly highish RHR of 68-70, and through exercise lowered it to my current 52. As far as CR, don't stress too much. Concentrate on not overeating and a healthy diet. With time, if you are disciplined, and your diet supplies all your micronutrient needs, you'll find that your calorie intake naturally goes down - if you maintain a BMI of 19 or so, you should be fine.

What is your BMI? My resting heart rate is high and wanting to low my resting heart rate?

Edited by Fernando Gabriel

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My BMI is 20.3 - a little bit high (usually I try to keep it at 19 or so). The way to lower your RHR is through aerobic exercise - something like jogging or Nordic Track or the like.

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On 4/18/2020 at 11:36 AM, Fernando Gabriel said:

What is your BMI? My resting heart rate is high and wanting to low my resting heart rate?

Exercise will lower your RHR quite a bit. I've also found that nitrate-rich vegetables (leafy greens, beets, etc), as well as legumes, also help lower it a little. When I do all of these my RHR is typically 50-52. If I go easy on the nitrate-rich veggies/legumes it creeps back up to 60 or so. I've tested this so many times I can say that it holds true with certainty (at least for me). Your mileage may vary. There are other factors too such as stress which may need to be addressed with meditation. I'm sure other confounding variables can be negatively associated with a higher RHR like overdoing stimulants, not enough time outdoors, poor sleep hygiene, etc. 

Edited by drewab

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Resting Heart Rate should not be looked at in isolation, in particular the relationship between RHR and BP (blood pressure) - how those numbers compare to each other can tell you a lot:

https://www.healthline.com/health/high-blood-pressure-low-pulse#meaning

And looking at BP it's also good to look at the relationship between SBP and DBP (Systolic and Diastolic) as in Pulse Pressure:

https://www.healthline.com/health/pulse-pressure

marker of arterial health:

https://www.nature.com/articles/hr201095

and exercise:

https://www.healthline.com/health/blood-pressure-after-exercise#safety-tips

When you exercise you are going to impact RHR through conditioning, but remember that blood pressure also comes into this through the additional factor of diet (as drewab mentioned) use of salt and so on.

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On 4/19/2020 at 5:57 PM, drewab said:

Exercise will lower your RHR quite a bit. I've also found that nitrate-rich vegetables (leafy greens, beets, etc), as well as legumes, also help lower it a little. ...

How do you measure this?

I use Fitbit and my RHR according to the watch is generally between 48 and 52. It will go up if one is getting sick (RHR goes up even before you become symptomatic usually), and I noticed it will go up for a couple of days if I drink 2-3 of glasses of wine.

But I am asking how you measure, because Fitbit gives me, for example 48 RHR today, but during sleep it gives me an average HR of between 43 and 47 on most days (my HR dips down to 40 bps, which I hope means that I am relatively fit, instead of having bradycardia).

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On 4/22/2020 at 9:32 PM, Ron Put said:

How do you measure this?

I use Fitbit and my RHR according to the watch is generally between 48 and 52. It will go up if one is getting sick (RHR goes up even before you become symptomatic usually), and I noticed it will go up for a couple of days if I drink 2-3 of glasses of wine.

But I am asking how you measure, because Fitbit gives me, for example 48 RHR today, but during sleep it gives me an average HR of between 43 and 47 on most days (my HR dips down to 40 bps, which I hope means that I am relatively fit, instead of having bradycardia).

How often and how long do you exercise and what exercises do you do?

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On 4/22/2020 at 6:32 PM, Ron Put said:

How do you measure this?

I use Fitbit and my RHR according to the watch is generally between 48 and 52. It will go up if one is getting sick (RHR goes up even before you become symptomatic usually), and I noticed it will go up for a couple of days if I drink 2-3 of glasses of wine.

But I am asking how you measure, because Fitbit gives me, for example 48 RHR today, but during sleep it gives me an average HR of between 43 and 47 on most days (my HR dips down to 40 bps, which I hope means that I am relatively fit, instead of having bradycardia).

I measure this using an at-home blood pressure cuff. The particular one I use is made by Omron.

Edited by drewab

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6 hours ago, Fernando Gabriel said:

How often and how long do you exercise and what exercises do you do?

I generally go for a hike/run 3-5 times a week, where I run on some uphill sections to get my heart rate up to peak for a few minutes.

Otherwise, i do a combination of planks, squats, push ups and pull ups, rotating.  So, maybe 5x25 push ups one day,  various squats the next day,  then maybe 5x10 pull ups the next day, with planks almost every day.  It doesn't take much time (I don't go to a gym) and it seems to work for me.  Like many things, consistency and good form are important.

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