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Ybx1 master gene for CR benefits?

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Scientists show how caloric restriction prevents negative effects of aging in cells    

https://phys.org/news/2020-02-scientists-caloric-restriction-negative-effects.html

The study “compared rats who ate 30 percent fewer calories with rats on normal diets. The animals' diets were controlled from age 18 months through 27 months.”

“Some of the cells and genes most affected by the diet related to immunity, inflammation and lipid metabolism. The number of immune cells in nearly every tissue studied dramatically increased as control rats aged but was not affected by age in rats with restricted calories. ”

“When the researchers homed in on transcription factors—essentially master switches that can broadly alter the activity of many other genes—that were altered by caloric restriction, one stood out. Levels of the transcription factor Ybx1 were altered by the diet in 23 different cell types.”

Cory

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Thanks Cory. This blurb from one of the science press accounts of this study caught my eye:

The number of immune cells in nearly every tissue studied dramatically increased as control rats aged but was not affected by age in rats with restricted calories. In brown adipose tissue -- one type of fat tissue -- a calorie-restricted diet reverted the expression levels of many anti-inflammatory genes to those seen in young animals.

It's virtually certain that these rats were housed at standard lab temperature, which is equivalent to moderate cold exposure as I've discussed on the cold exposure thread. So what this study seems to show is that the combination of CR and mild CE preserved anti-inflammatory gene expression, mediated at least in part by brown adipose tissue (BAT).

Anybody have the full text they can send me? Sci-hub doesn't seem able to retrieve it and I'd love to see the details. My email is my FirstnameLastname@gmail.com.

Thanks!

--Dean

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On 2/28/2020 at 2:18 PM, Dean Pomerleau said:

...

It's virtually certain that these rats were housed at standard lab temperature, which is equivalent to moderate cold exposure as I've discussed on the cold exposure thread. So what this study seems to show is that the combination of CR and mild CE preserved anti-inflammatory gene expression, mediated at least in part by brown adipose tissue (BAT)....

I may be missing something, but wouldn't both control and the CR animals be exposed to the same temperatures in the same lab?

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2 minutes ago, Ron Put said:

I may be missing something, but wouldn't both control and the CR animals be exposed to the same temperatures in the same lab?

Yes presumably. That is why I said "this study  seems to show is that the combination of CR and mild CE preserved anti-inflammatory gene expression, mediated at least in part by brown adipose tissue (BAT)...."

In other words, both the controls and CR rats were presumably housed at a chilly-for-rats standard lab temperature. Moderate CR on top of the shared CE kept the CR group thin and the combination kept inflammation down, with BAT apparently playing a role in that benefit. Is that not your understanding? If I could get the full text I'd be able to determine more...

But in the meantime, if you (or esp. others) haven't seen them already, see here and here for theory and evidence regarding synergy between CR and CE.

--Dean

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