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Clinton

Age Reduction Breakthrough

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Please read the article and the comments 

https://joshmitteldorf.scienceblog.com/2020/05/11/age-reduction-breakthrough/

Ashkay says topical gel should reach markets by early 2021.

This might not be the only solution but even according to Horvath this shiz is dialing the clock back more than 50%.

I already did the math, thanks: 😁

2 patches guarantees100% rejuv (or even more?!?!?)

 

here is the paper:

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.05.07.082917v1.full.pdf

👍👍

Edited by Clinton

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A rat study,  which, according to Mittledorf,  " shows promise of scaling up to humans."   

 Guillermo Fernandez asks a simple question:

Quote

Impressive paper! Glad to see you are shaking the world with such an amazing result during these difficult times. Welcome news which will hopefully help to shift paradigms.I wonder if you plan to conduct lifespan studies too. It would be great to see the effect of even a single treatment on life expectancy.

 
Akshay Atomic Bliss  replies:
Quote

Thank you Guillermo,
Yes indeed lifespan study is very important. We were conducting it but were interrupted by the pandemic lockdown. But we will soon be conducting it.

 

After his post on Covid-19,  and now this,  I'm beginning to wonder about Mr. Mittledorf.

image.thumb.png.e6035c997ebd7f886df3a52e13893e44.png

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Let’s see the results of that lifespan study - this is exciting!!

I understand that the evidence so far is only wrt rats but nothing (presumably) thus far would reverse an aging clock.  CR only slows aging.  If you start CR at age 30 you will be healthier at age 31 than if you had continued to eat ad libitum but the clock is still moving forward- not back.

Lets just see how this pans out - if the lifespan study surpasses CR then they might have made an incredible discovery.

Edited by Clinton

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I'm skeptical. First, I don't trust the Horvath clock. I'd certainly like longevity studies, even though it's in rats. Second, I am not convinced by the central idea about aging that Josh Mittledorf seems to promot - I think it's much more complicated, and changing just a few compounds in the bloodstream seems to me highly unlikely to result in any big impact on aging. That said, parabiosis is a tricky thing:

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/11/6/1337/htm

Not to mention, we have zero idea if there are any deal-breaking side effects of this treatment, longer term, or as Thomas Rando says:

"My suspicion is that chronic treatments with anything — plasma, drugs — that rejuvenate cells in old animals is going to lead to an increase in cancer. Even if we learn how to make cells young, it’s something we’ll want to do judiciously."

https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/parabiosis-the-next-snakeoil/

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I like seeing the enthusiasm and encouraging initial results.  It will be nice to see them do some actual longevity experiments with rodents, especially if they start with elderly rodents and use controls, it shouldn't take too long to find out just how promising their approach really is.   Looks like these guys are conducting human experiments on themselves, which I suppose at least shows a lot of confidence in the safety of whatever it is they have cooked up.  

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It makes some sense on the surface, but it might be a bit more complex:

Impact of Transfusion on Cancer Growth and Outcome

For many years, transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells, platelet concentrates, and plasma units has been part of the standard therapeutic arsenal used along the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of patients with malignancies. Although the benefits of these blood products are not a matter of debate in specific pathological conditions associated with life-threatening low blood cell counts or bleeding, increasing clinical evidence is nevertheless suggesting that deliberate transfusion of these blood components may actually lead to negative clinical outcomes by affecting patient’s immune defense, stimulating tumor growth, tethering, and dissemination. Rigorous preclinical and clinical studies are needed to dimension the clinical relevance, benefits, and risks of transfusion of blood components in cancer patients and understand the amplitude of problems. There is also a need to consider validating preparation methods of blood components for so far ignored biological markers, such as microparticles and biological response modifiers. Meanwhile, blood component transfusions should be regarded as a personalized medicine, taking into careful consideration the status and specificities of the patient, rather than as a routine hospital procedure.

 

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Sinclair has also reviewed and believes that this is for real.

Only the hypothalamus wasn't completely rejuvenated - but was improved - at least it was significant.

I have volunteered for the first trials.

I will combine this  with some 5-day fasting (or fasting-mimicking); decent amounts of vitamin D3, K2, melatonin; lots of exercise, sleep, sulforaphane (every other day), spermidine, lots of all micro-nutrients, wfpb diet.

 

 

Edited by Clinton

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6 hours ago, Clinton said:

I have volunteered for the first trials.

Hm, interesting. How did you apply?

When does it start and what does it involve?

 

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I hope we both get in on this, Ron.

In addition to whatever bio markers they plan to assess, I will be keeping a very close eye on any visible changes wrt wrinkles, any change with age spots, any change in amount of grey hair and any hair regrow this.  Any other ideas of physical markers to keep an eye on??

 I will certainly take before and after photos.

Edited by Clinton

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Thanks again, Clinton!  I wrote to him and got an "will keep this in mind" email back.

I hope we get in, too :)  But it'd be good to research the potential side-effects, including potential increased cancer proliferation in older folks.

Let's see when we hear back.

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I'm not a scientist and have no medical background, so my ability to really wrap my head around all of this is limited.

Potentially dumb question: If this research is about blood transfusions how will a topical gel produce the same results?

I clicked through all of the links I could and didn't see any information on the topical gel under development. Does anyone have more info about it? I'm not sure if I would be willing to volunteer for a human trial or not, but I am curious about it. 

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50 minutes ago, Ron Put said:

We talk about senolytics being a huge area of aging research/slowing aging.  Inflammation is implicated in ?every? disease related to aging, and seems to accelerate or even causes aging- coined ‘inflammaging”.  Epigenetic clocks that are possibly our most accurate method of assessing biological age.  Cognitive and physical biomarkers of performance that decline with age.

ALL of these areas were improved dramatically and reset back to youthful levels- if you look at the study and see that the senescent cells were reduced back to youthful levels, epigenetic age of every tissue rejuvenated.  Dramatically improved endogenous anti-oxidant levels; all of these *should* dramatically lower risk of cancer; but as with anything - we won’t know for sure until we study it.

Edited by Clinton

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Thomas, the IV injection coined ‘elixir’ seems to be what mimics young blood plasma.  It isn’t clear - at least to me - what the gel or transdermal patch does.

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Look at these tissue samples -  senescent cells are blue.  Which cells would you want as an old rat.

image.png.26475fc396e983552f7fae105a96542b.png

Edited by Clinton

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I actually knew someone who had "young blood" transfusions periodically, in a private clinic, years ago.  He died in his late 90s. In that case, who knows if it helped, or how it was done (it was considered kind of a "secret."

Here is a summary of some developments in the field I just came across. mentioning the closing of Ambrosia.  There is sound science behind this as far as I can tell, so let's hope that this is a real step forward and that we get more details soon.

https://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/news/20190220/young-blood-clinics-shut-down-after-fda-action
 

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Here is something interesting with respect to (at least one type of) cancer:

The effect of red blood cell transfusion on plasma hepcidin and growth differentiation factor 15 in gastric cancer patients: a prospective study

 

Background

Hepcidin and growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) have been reported to be highly expressed in various cancers. Serum hepcidin and GDF-15 levels were demonstrated to be potential prognostic markers in cancers. This study aims to evaluate the effect of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion on plasma hepcidin and GDF-15 in gastric cancer patients.

...

Results

In patients with metastasis, plasma hepcidin (P=0.02), and GDF-15 (P=0.01) levels were higher than without metastasis. Plasma hepcidin was increased after RBC transfusion (P=0.001), while plasma erythropoietin was decreased after transfusion (P=0.03). However, RBC transfusion did not affect plasma GDF-15 (P=0.32) and IL-6 (P=0.12). The effect of RBC transfusion on variables did not differ between metastatic and non-metastatic patients. The mean percentage change of hepcidin in transfusion volume 4 unit (U) was more than 2 U.

Conclusions

RBC transfusion could increase plasma hepcidin and have no effect on plasma GDF-15 in gastric patients.

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