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Ron Put

Blood Panel: What to Test Annually?

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Huh, Ron, that's very interesting - I just checked my numbers, and my latest test from the end of May, the MPV is "flagged" as being outside of the range, although the range is different from what your lab is showing. My lab is UCLA and the range is 9.3 - 13.0 fL 

The lab is:

Lab
RONALD REAGAN UCLA MC CLINICAL LABORATORY
757 Westwood Plaza
Los Angeles CA 90095
Tel: 310-267-8100
Lab Director: Alyssa Ziman, MD

and FWIW, they have had the same range for a very long time (looking through my records). Now, my last test came flagged as outside of range at 13.1 which is just outside of the upper limit of 13.0. However, looking through the years, it looks like I'm consistently at 13.0 (i.e. right at the upper limit), except for 2016, where I'm a LOT more outside of the range at 13.8.

Very interesting. I never paid much attention to this, so thanks for that, Ron. 

Edited by TomBAvoider

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On 8/7/2020 at 11:54 AM, TomBAvoider said:

Huh, Ron, that's very interesting - I just checked my numbers, and my latest test from the end of May, the MPV is "flagged" as being outside of the range, although the range is different from what your lab is showing. My lab is UCLA and the range is 9.3 - 13.0 fL ...

The lab which did mine this time is Westpac Labs (I was testing amylase isoenzymes and they do it, so I tested MPV too).

Their range is 7.4-11.9.  My doctor said to ignore it, it is not significant in my case.  But I do wonder if CR or intermittent fasting increases it in healthy people?

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I was looking at some new blood panel results and today being Sunday and all, decided to explore how important the various types of white blood cells are.

Interesting and I would suggest that at some point those are all checked, to establish a baseline and see if there are any issues.

It seems that the various ratios of significant importance.  For instance, the neutrophil/lymphocyte appears to predict mortality under various circumstances, including viral and bacterial infections.  In many, the ratio increases with age.  Here are a couple of examples:

Inflammation biomarkers in blood as mortality predictors in community-acquired pneumonia admitted patients: Importance of comparison with neutrophil count percentage or neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio

 

Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio as an independent risk factor for mortality in hospitalized patients with COVID-19

 

 

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On 8/10/2020 at 10:49 PM, Ron Put said:

The lab which did mine this time is Westpac Labs (I was testing amylase isoenzymes and they do it, so I tested MPV too).

Their range is 7.4-11.9.  My doctor said to ignore it, it is not significant in my case.  But I do wonder if CR or intermittent fasting increases it in healthy people?

MPV: my lab gives a normality range of 7.4-10.4 fL

My recent value is 7.6, almost on the lower bound of the normality range.

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Four biomarkers of endogenous cardioprotective molecules include N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, neurohormonal activity), erythropoietin (erythropoiesis and hypoxic response mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1)), adiponectin (insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory pathway), and extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD or SOD3, antioxidant enzyme in the arterial wall). B-type natriuretic peptide, a bioactive counterpart of NT-proBNP, causes natriuresis and diuresis, arterial dilatation, and antagonism of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, thus counter-regulating hemodynamic abnormalities in heart failure21. All of these cardioprotective biomarkers are upregulated in elderly patients with heart failure17,18,19,20. Three inflammatory mediators include interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and angiopoietin-like protein 2 (Angptl2). Angptl2 is upregulated in obesity and type 2 diabetes and accelerates endothelial inflammation, atherosclerosis, and the pathogenesis of heart failure22,23. Finally, reduced reserve capacity of multiple organ systems is involved in heart failure in old age24; hence, the levels of two biomarkers, cystatin C and cholinesterase, are measured as indicators of the functional reserves of the kidney and liver, respectively25,26. Cystatin C is selected because it shows a much higher correlation with age than does creatinine in approximately 5000 healthy individuals ranging from 25 to 110 years27. These nine candidate biomarkers are assessed for associations with survival in multiple cohorts of centenarians, (semi)-supercentenarians, and very old individuals, compared with traditional cardiovascular risk factors and plasma albumin, which are independent predictors of mortality in older adults28. First, we show an age-related increase in cardioprotective and inflammatory biomarkers, and a decrease in organ reserves up to 115 years of age. Of these, four biomarkers including NT-proBNP, interleukin-6, cystatin C, and cholinesterase are associated with all-cause mortality at the oldest old. Finally, only the relationship between NT-proBNP and all-cause mortality is robust against adjustment for traditional risk factors, inflammation, and organ reserve.

 

 

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