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InquilineKea

Is ashwagandha anti-aging?

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I do use it (specifically this is the one I use but it is out of stock at the time of this posting).

Some references:

An Investigation Into the Stress-Relieving and Pharmacological Actions of an Ashwagandha (Withania Somnifera) Extract: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

Efficacy and Safety of Ashwagandha (Withania Somnifera (L.) Dunal) Root Extract in Improving Memory and Cognitive Functions

Scientific Basis for the Therapeutic Use of Withania Somnifera (Ashwagandha): A Review

 

Results: Studies indicate ashwagandha possesses anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antistress, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, hemopoietic, and rejuvenating properties. It also appears to exert a positive influence on the endocrine, cardiopulmonary, and central nervous systems. The mechanisms of action for these properties are not fully understood. Toxicity studies reveal that ashwagandha appears to be a safe compound.

Conclusion: Preliminary studies have found various constituents of ashwagandha exhibit a variety of therapeutic effects with little or no associated toxicity. These results are very encouraging and indicate this herb should be studied more extensively to confirm these results and reveal other potential therapeutic effects. Clinical trials using ashwagandha for a variety of conditions should also be conducted.

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Ashwagandha is one of the only herbal supplements afaik that has positive benefits wrt muscle/strength gain; and as a result I've taken it over the years.  Ref:  (and also see the Examine link wrt strengh & muscle - the last one I posted below)

https://www.muscleandstrength.com/articles/ultimate-guide-to-ashwagandha

WRT anti-aging; the metformin & rapamycin 'combo' is well known.  THIS study "towards natural mimetics of metformin and rapamycin"   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5723685/  found that EGCg (main catechin in green tea) mimicked rapamycin to some extent and that glucosamine mimicked metformin to some extent ... but that ASHWAGANDHA seemed to mimic both rapamycin and metformin.

It seems to have positive effects on telomeres, lower cortisol (adaptogen).  Not sure why this isn't as popular or more popular than curcumin & resveratrol ...

I buy this one:

https://www.betterhealthinternational.com/jarrow-formulas-ashwagandha-300-mg-120-veggie-caps

There area  couple patented blends out there.  KSM-66 uses the entire root which is what I was interested in after reading this:

https://examine.com/supplements/ashwagandha/

 

 

 

Edited by Clinton

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I'm not an expert on adaptogens, but for anabolic and energizing effects I would go straight to ginseng or rodhiola.

My take on Ashwagandha is one of anti-stress adaptogen, so, if there is a condition of chronic stress and related chronic hi-cortisol levels, then there may be an indirect beneficial effect on muscle strength (as already said, decreased cortisol, no inhibition on natural testosterone levels and so on).

The adjective 'somnifera' means bearer of sleep, so the most well known quality is maybe that of a mildly, naturally sedative, relaxing adaptogen.

By the way, this thread reminded me about adaptogens, I tried something for a while but I'm going to try again, maybe after more thorough research. One of the main problems, like in all supplements, is the standard of quality, it's easy to burn money on not-too-effective products.

 

Edited by mccoy

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On 6/6/2020 at 11:11 AM, Clinton said:

I buy this one:

Hi, Clinton. This is another option (it's what I have bought previously):

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Premium-Pure-Organic-Ashwagandha-Root-Powder-Herbal-Supplement-That-Promotes-Vitality-Strength-8oz-227g/894477716

It's also available on Amazon, but I've been trying to limit my purchases from Amazon when possible....

Edited by Ron Put

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On 6/9/2020 at 6:53 PM, Clinton said:

Thanks Ron,

 I will check and see if we have it at Walmart in Canada.

Oh, here a link to the source:

https://microingredients.com/products/organic-ashwagandha-root-powder-1-5-pound

I am just trying to limit my Amazon purchases since Amazon has started squeezing vendors for exclusives, which means that a lot of stuff becomes unavailable at other sites, like Petco.  I just don't want to see what is already an effective monopoly grow even more aggresively (I've been hoping that the Feds would break the company up at some point soon since it's not just the main store, but the server-side business, Prime, groceries, etc.. :)

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Are there any negative side effects of taking this powder? I have read some people have allergic reactions like itchiness and liver toxicity. I would be interested in taking this powder to reduce my levels of anxiety, which may be a result of being in menapause. 

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51 minutes ago, Shezian said:

liver toxicity.

Do you have a source for that?

Above reference says "Toxicity studies reveal that ashwagandha appears to be a safe compound.

Conclusion: Preliminary studies have found various constituents of ashwagandha exhibit a variety of therapeutic effects with little or no associated toxicity."

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16 hours ago, Shezian said:

Are there any negative side effects of taking this powder? I have read some people have allergic reactions like itchiness and liver toxicity. I would be interested in taking this powder to reduce my levels of anxiety, which may be a result of being in menapause. 

Dr. Aviva Romm has an excellent blog on adaptogens. This is her description of Shatavari, which seems particularly useful to women:

 

Quote

Shatavari: The Hormonal Harmonizer, Queen of Women’s Adaptogens

Shatavari is considered the “Queen of Herbs” in Ayurvedic medicine, where it is beloved as one of the most powerful rejuvenating tonics for women. It is nourishing and calming, as well as hormonally balancing; it is used for irritability and many hormonal imbalances affecting the mood, for example, emotional symptoms of PMS and menopause. It is also used as a fertility tonic and may be used for vaginal dryness, low libido, and sleep problems in perimenopause. In addition, research suggests benefits for improving immunity, antioxidant activity, improved insulin secretion, reduction in gastric acidity, and the prevention of stress ulcers. It has mild estrogenic and cholesterol-lowering effects.

Dose: 2-4 mL (40-80 drops) of tincture, in water, 2-3 times daily

Cautions: Avoid if you have a history of estrogen-receptor positive cancer.

 

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And this is the description of Ashwagandha, always from Aviva Romm:

 

Quote

Ashwagandha: The Soothing Adaptogen

Ashwagandha has over 4,000 years of traditional use in India. It is considered both a food and a tonic medicine for improving energy, memory and learning, promoting libido, and preventing premature aging. Ashwagandha is calming and anti-inflammatory. It is used to improve sleep, reduce anxiety, improve memory, and reduce inflammation and oxidative stress (damage from inflammation). It boosts the immune system, is included in the treatment of arthritis and can be beneficial in the treatment of fertility challenges.

Dose: 3 to 6 grams of the dried herb in capsule form daily OR 1 to 4 mL  (20-80 drops) of tincture, in water, 3 times per day

Cautions: Not for use in pregnancy; though not likely to be a problem, use cautiously if you are sensitive to plants in the nightshade family; avoid with pharmaceutical sedatives and pain medications.

 

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19 hours ago, Gordo said:

Do you have a source for that?

Above reference says "Toxicity studies reveal that ashwagandha appears to be a safe compound.

Conclusion: Preliminary studies have found various constituents of ashwagandha exhibit a variety of therapeutic effects with little or no associated toxicity."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK548536/

 

http://www.mensahmedical.com/ashwagandha-dangers/

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My take, after having read the links: adaptogens by definition must-have no collateral effects, so ashwagandha is mostly innocuous. This has been observed empirically through the millennia.

Neverhteless, if we did clinical trial on the safety of this herb, we would probably come up with a limited amount of people sensitive to its molecules. This may be the same for all herbs and adaptogens, sometimes it is true for foods. In a limited number of people, peanuts can be deadly, fava beans can be dangerous, tomatoes and nightshade may give allergies, and so on.

A common warning in ashwagandha is that it must not be taken during pregnancy.

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