Jump to content
InquilineKea

My random notes/stream of consciousness thread

Recommended Posts

Since I know others might appreciate my output.

Magnesium glycinate seems to be a killer supplement cuz it has BOTH magnesium and glycine.. It's hard to regularly dose too many supplements, and the core is taurine+carnosine+curcumin/piperine+B12+D+modafinil+green tea powder

Edited by InquilineKea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"My random notes/stream of consciousness thread" - I thought every thread you post is random/stream of consciousness? 

Why is it a killer supplement? What are the benefits of supplementing with magnesium if your diet is good (good diet applies to most on these boards)? Why is glycine a good thing to supplement with - we just saw a lengthy thread from Ron asking questions about glycine and it's a very complicated story with possible dangers of cancer when supplementing - you reference nothing of that complexity, you just make a random assertion with nothing behind it. Why is the "core" taurine+carnosine+curcumin/piperine+B12+D+modafinil+green tea powder? Seems a random collection of supplements with very, very complicated stories - you just mashed them together with nary a context... like stream of consciousness.

In other words, as always, you drop these random questions or assertions with nothing behind them and no in-depth research and expect - I don't know what - that others will do all the research for you? Just random, random stuff. But whatever makes you happy - I'm just astonished to see you select this particular thread to call "random" and "stream of consciousness" when for the life of me I can't tell the difference - in the respect of randomness - from any other thread you post. Of course, it might just be for the club of those who "appreciate your output". 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They help bring up threads that others find useful! Even if my posts are short, I frequently use the search feature so I'm highly aware of what's new to people and what isn't, so my threads bring up a lot of novel content, esp b/c this is one of the best high-quality boards of aging content, but there are still A LOT of missing (but still important) threads

Edited by InquilineKea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My theory is that InquilineKea is actually not a real person, but part of an elaborate AI experiment from someone in these forums.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OMG, Gordo, that is super on the mark! I now am 100% convinced InquilineKea is an AI bot! The giveaway can be found in those experiments with bots trying to pass the Turing Test - the characteristic of those bots is that they never supply any new information or have any depth, but rather they "ask" questions - simply grab something a human says and turn it into a question so it looks sentient. 

Human: I had to solve a really difficult math problem to make this work.

Bot: How did that make you feel?

Human: It made me feel very tired.

Bot: Why did it make you feel tired?

And so on.

This is InquilineKea in a nutshell - pointless questions with no followup and random remarks, and no original contribution. Mostly "questions". Gordo, you're a genious!

Edited by TomBAvoider

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK Guys,

You got me. Inquilinekea is one of my bots. 🙂

But seriously. We've been discussing who is Alex K Chen (aka InquilineKea) and why he asks so many questions for years. Here is one example. There is even a thread about him that I started in 2016 on the admin/moderator board for these fora called "Mr. Questions - Alex K Chen (aka InquilineKea)". We concluded he is harmless, and very occasionally makes thoughtful contributions rather than just asking questions (e.g. here). He was even active on the CR mailing list back to at least 2012 before these fora were created (search "simfish" Tom).

We've had it easy for the last few years since Alex went quiet here around 2017. But he's continued to ask lots of questions (and answer quite a few) on Quora. His Quora profile shows he has asked 62K questions since 2013. Here is a good one. He's also very active on Reddit.

I've even communicated with Alex via email. He asked if we might meet up during a visit he made to Pittsburgh a couple years ago. It didn't work out so I couldn't verify his humanity first hand. 🙂

If he's a bot, he is a very good one. I for one welcome our new AI overlords. 🙂

--Dean

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While it did cross my mind as a distinct possibility, at least I learned about 8-oxo-G.  It remains to be determined how useful this information is, I'll discuss with my doctor on Monday.

What I think is definitely a bot is Fernando....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He is currently up to 62,334 Questions Asked on Reddit.  I feel like we should probably throw some kind of party for him when he hits 64,000.  Should we count all the ones he has asked here too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He does ask a lot of questions.. 

When I've tried to communicate with him and ask some back, he almost never responds. 😉

Must be artificially intelligent 😎

Edited by Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Matt said:

Must be artificially intelligent

Funny, I think of InquilineKea as a "she."  Maybe like Alicia Vikander in Ex Machina :D

LOVE the paper though??!  The paper talks about random damage, which I also have thought of as a given, in general, in addition to direct damage.  But what do I know? 

The de Grey reference is, if anything, a negative, IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ron Put said:

The paper talks about random damage, which I also have thought of as a given, in general, in addition to direct damage.  But what do I know? 

It's not about "random damage",  but specifically   the  multiple ways aging and disease result from "the accumulation of intra-intermolecular covalent bonds (crosslinks) between molecules with slow turnovers, such as collagen and elastin of the extracellular matrix (ECM) "

This is not a new topic, of course, but the authors go into a lot of dimensions that haven't been discussed that much.

FWIW, I'm not a a huge fan of Aubrey de Grey  myself.   Particularly wrt the business aspect of his endeavors.  But I try to assess his scientific contributions individually and on their own merit,  or lack of it, apart from his broader anti-aging philosophy and business model.

In any case,  de Grey merely made some " helpful comments on the manuscript ",  so it would be silly to draw any conclusions from that acknowledgment, even from an ad hominem perspective.

Perhaps  your anti-Russian attitudes  (well noted in the Calment controversy discussion)  have predisposed you against this paper?   Take a look at the full text;  there are some interesting ideas there.

Edited by Sibiriak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
 
✌
1
8 hours ago, Sibiriak said:

It's not about "random damage",  ...

This is not a new topic, of course, but the authors go into a lot of dimensions that haven't been discussed that much.

... Perhaps  your anti-Russian attitudes  (well noted in the Calment controversy discussion)  have predisposed you against this paper?   Take a look at the full text;  there are some interesting ideas there.

Hm, but it is about random damage and it's presented as something groundbreaking:  "However, the list of proposed hallmarks is missing the stochastic non-enzymatic modification of long-lived macromolecules. In this review, we summarized all evidence that it is in fact one of the primary, causative hallmarks."  I perused the paper and it is a good overview, but I just don't see anything new in it, or at least in the part that they state is new.

Nothing to do with it being Russian.  And please don't assume that because I find the current leadership of Russia poisonous to its neighbors and to the world community, I hold anti-Russian views.  On the contrary, I am a Russophile, in that I admire Russia's very significant cultural and scientific contributions to our world, and I have many close Russian friends.

If anything, I feel disappointed and sad about Russia, because I really thought that things may have been different if the West had acted differently after the fall of the USSR.  The US has not had a coherent strategic vision since the mid-1990s when Clinton essentially put Harvard's Institute for Int'l Development in charge of America's Russia policy and USAID, with little to no oversight.  People like Summers propped up budding oligarchs like the Chubais clan and paved the way for Russian nationalism and distrust of Western "experts."  And successive US administrations have not done better.  The US should have promoted transparency in Russia, and helped integrate Russia into the world community, but it failed to do so.  Swiss, German and British banks viewed Russia (and much of Eastern Europe) as a place they could make a lot of money and not play by the rules applicable within Western Europe.  It was a recipe for disaster and we got it, in the shape of Putin and Russian nationalism.

Anyway, I am digressing and this is not the place for it, but I find what happened in Russia really depressing, even though I like visiting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/4/2020 at 12:45 AM, Matt said:

He does ask a lot of questions.. 

When I've tried to communicate with him and ask some back, he almost never responds. 😉

Must be artificially intelligent 😎

you never respond to me either!!!! and i wanted to see you in britain!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

APR 22, 2020, 4:41 PM

You named the group CANONICAL AGING PAPERS.
You named the group CANONICAL AGING PAPERS (mechanistic, upstream of other factors).
You added Diana Leung to the group.
Alex K. Chen
Alternative splicing in aging and age-related diseases
You added Rob Sheko to the group.
You named the group CANONICAL AGING PAPERS (mechanistic, upstream of other factors, highly generalizeable and less ad hoc).
Alex K. Chen
longer mRNAs are more prone to disruption - i wonder which proteins have longest mRNAs apart from titin
clonal hemapoetesis
Altering nuclear pore complex function impacts longevity and mitochondrial function in S. cerevisiae
Alex K. Chen
Visualization of long-lived proteins reveals age mosaicism within nuclei of postmitotic cells. Toyama BH, Arrojo E Drigo R, Lev-Ram V, Ramachandra R, Deerinck TJ, Lechene C, Ellisman MH, Hetzer MW. J Cell Biol. 2019 Feb 4;218(2):433-444. doi: 10.1083/jcb.201809123. Epub 2018 Dec 14. PubMed [citation] PMID: 30552100 PMCID: PMC6363465
Alex K. Chen
E2/E3 protein ligases, methyltransferases, acetyltransferases, kinases VS all proteins involved in DNA damage response
changes in nucleolar size with age (it seems nucleasomes keep aggregating)
The emerging role of alternative splicing in senescence and aging is a masterpiece
Advances in targeted degradation of endogenous proteins

APR 22, 2020, 7:32 PM

You added Cesar Ruiz de Castilla to the group.
Alex K. Chen
The Mechanobiology of Aging Jude M. Phillip,#1,2 Ivie Aifuwa,#1,2 Jeremy Walston,3 and Denis Wirtz1,2,4
❤1
Cesar Ruiz de Castilla
Cesar Ruiz de Castilla
Will read this looks interesting
*read as many of these
Alex K. Chen
thanks! 🙂 i think these are among the most impt/SO WELL WRITTEN
friend denis!
Olafur Pall Olafsson
Olafur Pall Olafsson
good initiative Alex. I got to read more of these later
Amit Tal
Amit Tal
I’ll be doing the same, thanks so much
Alex K. Chen
Alex K. Chen <simfish@gmail.com>

Fri, Nov 8, 2019, 7:39 PM

to David
https://www.facebook.com/odinokov lists many of them - he has been
on a roll lately

Ben Best for sure [not academic papers but websites].

JP de Magalhaes has a cool website but his papers aren't the best
(biostatistics is messy and papers are often published before the data
is perfected and you often tease out mRNA that you like barely
understand)

i'll look in my pubmed favorites

On Fri, Nov 8, 2019 at 7:35 PM David Bieber <david810@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>

Alex K. Chen <simfish@gmail.com>

Fri, Nov 8, 2019, 7:39 PM

to David
the evolutionary biology people are often very clear if not consistently correct

Alex K. Chen <simfish@gmail.com>

Fri, Nov 8, 2019, 7:40 PM

to David
VADIM gladyshev
Alex K. Chen <simfish@gmail.com>

Fri, Nov 8, 2019, 7:44 PM

to David
I like https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16533927 a lot they
actually are good at guessing at whatever the mechanisms are

Alex K. Chen <simfish@gmail.com>

Fri, Nov 8, 2019, 7:46 PM

to David
so like, i like steve austad and the other evolutionary biology
people. also daniel promislow. they don't think at the highest level
[in the way that people who do information-theoretic/information
theory/shannon communication theories of aging do it] but it's good
enough for me to quickly understand it.
Alex K. Chen <simfish@gmail.com>

Fri, Nov 8, 2019, 7:47 PM

to David
also J Vijg
Alex K. Chen <simfish@gmail.com>

Fri, Nov 8, 2019, 7:51 PM

to David
also like caleb finch is THE walking encyclopedia on aging but he's
oldr so he might not be as up to date on the newer details

certainly there has to be someone who is a walking encyclopedia of all
the post-translational oxidative/carbonyl modifications that can
affect proteins and how they affect the shape of said protein
Alex K. Chen
Johnson, A. A., Shokhirev, M. N., Wyss-Coray, T., & Lehallier, B. (2020). Systematic review and analysis of human proteomics aging studies unveils a novel proteomic aging clock and identifies key processes that change with age. Ageing Research Reviews, 101070. doi:10.1016/j.arr.2020.101070
You added Sarah Constantin to the group.

APR 23, 2020, 2:24 AM

MAY 13, 2020, 3:20 PM

You added Emanuele Ascani to the group.

MAY 13, 2020, 5:55 PM

You added John Wentworth to the group.

JUN 2, 2020, 3:23 AM

You added Aahan Rashid to the group.

WED 9:25 PM

You added Vienna Thomas to the group.
Alex K. Chen
You added José Luis Ricón to the group.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, InquilineKea said:

You never respond to me either!!!! And I wanted to see you in Britain!!!

You have to go right back to the beginning...  Maybe I stopped responding because you didn't respond to my follow up questions?

You mean by going to Oxford or London? I don't remember the circumstances, but it was probably more to do with lack of money at the time than anything else. I barely had any work at the time.

I have met people in IRL that I've spoken to online, but I've also had some reciprocal effort and communication from them. We barely ever even spoke to each other. 

But even so, I still didn't have the money to be using it on travelling at the time.

Edited by Matt
Clarification

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×